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    Roughly what proportion of people get into their first choice ST post first time round?
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    I really should get on with doing stuff for this at some point.
    Because other than pointless academics I have nothing.
    But research is so horrible....
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    (Original post by Isometrix)
    Roughly what proportion of people get into their first choice ST post first time round?
    Depends what you mean by ST post. Do you mean CT/ST1 or ST3? For the former, most people get their first choice for the non-runthrough specialities - some like neurosurgery and public health are much more competitive at that level. For ST3 applications, things are generally much more competitive, especially for surgery where 2/3 core surgical trainees don't get a single surgical ST post.
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    (Original post by Captain Crash)
    Depends what you mean by ST post. Do you mean CT/ST1 or ST3? For the former, most people get their first choice for the non-runthrough specialities - some like neurosurgery and public health are much more competitive at that level. For ST3 applications, things are generally much more competitive, especially for surgery where 2/3 core surgical trainees don't get a single surgical ST post.
    That must really really suck.
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    That must really really suck.
    *shrug* It's just extremely poor workforce planning by the Royal College of Surgeons who need the ward cover provided by CTs but not expanding ST numbers similarly. This isn't exactly a secret - most wannabe surgeons know this, but assume that they'll be in the one in three who get a registrar job. Such people deserve everything they get.
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    (Original post by Captain Crash)
    Depends what you mean by ST post. Do you mean CT/ST1 or ST3? For the former, most people get their first choice for the non-runthrough specialities - some like neurosurgery and public health are much more competitive at that level. For ST3 applications, things are generally much more competitive, especially for surgery where 2/3 core surgical trainees don't get a single surgical ST post.
    Ah right, yeah I meant what proportion go straight into ST after foundation rather than having to do core training.
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    (Original post by Isometrix)
    Ah right, yeah I meant what proportion go straight into ST after foundation rather than having to do core training.
    Well all surgical, medical and acute specialities require you to do core training before applying for ST posts. The remaining run-through training posts (i.e. speciality training available straight from foundation - paeds, O&G, neurosurgery, radiology) are quite competitive, with the exception of GP training.
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    (Original post by Captain Crash)
    Well all surgical, medical and acute specialities require you to do core training before applying for ST posts. The remaining run-through training posts (i.e. speciality training available straight from foundation - paeds, O&G, neurosurgery, radiology) are quite competitive, with the exception of GP training.
    Ortho was still available as runthrough in Northern, North Western, Yorkshire, West Mids and Scotland last time I checked. Though ridiculously competitive.

    (Original post by Captain Crash)
    *shrug* It's just extremely poor workforce planning by the Royal College of Surgeons who need the ward cover provided by CTs but not expanding ST numbers similarly. This isn't exactly a secret - most wannabe surgeons know this, but assume that they'll be in the one in three who get a registrar job. Such people deserve everything they get.
    What's wrong with optimism? I might be planning ahead a little, but if I'm one of the 2/3 then I see that as the perfect time to get pregnant.
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    (Original post by Becca-Sarah)
    What's wrong with optimism? I might be planning ahead a little, but if I'm one of the 2/3 then I see that as the perfect time to get pregnant.
    If you're not working for the NHS though, you run into trouble getting maternity pay.
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    So here's a question, while we're on the topic of babies... I am mentally formulating my answer to all the standard questions. The one that I'm stuck on is "Where do you see yourself in 10 years' time?" Now, the honest answer is that while I still intend to be working in my chosen specialty, I don't anticipate that I will have completed training as I hope to take time off to have kids and probably work part-time for a while. However, I get the feeling that the answer they want is that you'll be a consultant (or near to) or if you're not it'll be because you've gone to do a PhD/teach/save Africa or something (the former two are still options for me as well, perhaps alongside sprogs!). So should I be honest or should I sell myself as more purely career-minded than I really am?
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    So here's a question, while we're on the topic of babies... I am mentally formulating my answer to all the standard questions. The one that I'm stuck on is "Where do you see yourself in 10 years' time?" Now, the honest answer is that while I still intend to be working in my chosen specialty, I don't anticipate that I will have completed training as I hope to take time off to have kids and probably work part-time for a while. However, I get the feeling that the answer they want is that you'll be a consultant (or near to) or if you're not it'll be because you've gone to do a PhD/teach/save Africa or something (the former two are still options for me as well, perhaps alongside sprogs!). So should I be honest or should I sell myself as more purely career-minded than I really am?
    I don't see how being entirely honest would be of most benefit. Perhaps a white lie or not quite the whole truth would be more useful?
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    So here's a question, while we're on the topic of babies... I am mentally formulating my answer to all the standard questions. The one that I'm stuck on is "Where do you see yourself in 10 years' time?" Now, the honest answer is that while I still intend to be working in my chosen specialty, I don't anticipate that I will have completed training as I hope to take time off to have kids and probably work part-time for a while. However, I get the feeling that the answer they want is that you'll be a consultant (or near to) or if you're not it'll be because you've gone to do a PhD/teach/save Africa or something (the former two are still options for me as well, perhaps alongside sprogs!). So should I be honest or should I sell myself as more purely career-minded than I really am?
    Well, I suppose wouldn't that be mostly down to your own preference? Do you want to be entirely truthful to an employer or not?

    It's pretty fair to assume that they would prefer you to say consultant as opposed to taken time off to have kids as the latter comes with a set of problems where as the former does not. I'm sure you already know this though which is why you're asking the question. They can't judge you on the record for wanting to go part time and extend training but there are easily other ways they can reject you for posts due to it if they want to. It's your own morals which will say whether you're fine to lie in an interview to increase your chances to gain a post or not.

    I'm probably speaking above my position but that's my two cents anyway.
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    If it were me I'd just say theres a number of avenues which you're thinking about (which include teaching, further study and children/flexible working) but you'd like to keep an open mind at the moment and explain what action you'll take to help with these decisions. Then just stress your commitment to specialty and perhaps talk about some of your ambitions within that specialty??
    I think to an interviewer the grade of doctor you'd like to be in 10 years time matters less than ideas and motivation within the their specialty.
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    Fortunately, they didn't ask
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    Fortunately, they didn't ask
    Does it really matter even if you do say you want kids? After all, with 60-70% of medical students being women the profession has to change.
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    Does it really matter even if you do say you want kids? After all, with 60-70% of medical students being women the profession has to change.
    I know it has to, and it is, to an extent. Legally they can't discriminate against you because of wanting a family, but I get the impression it's not the "right" sort of answer.

    God, I really hope I got it this time. :s:
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    God, I really hope I got it this time. :s:
    Is it too soon to be relentlessly checking the offers portal?
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    The one that I'm stuck on is "Where do you see yourself in 10 years' time?"
    In my opinion, that's an opportunity to discuss what you know about the speciality.

    "I'd like to have completed my anaesthetic training, hopefully with dual accreditation in intensive care, I'd also like to have taken an OOPE in something like remote or third-world medicine..."
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    (Original post by ThisLittlePiggy)
    Thanks for the heads up Jamie, :top:

    I'd better get off my backside and get something together.


    Wish there was social criteria...
    Spoiler:
    Show

    0-none
    1-informal drinking
    2-Contribution to formal drinking events
    3-Major contribution to the local drinking scene
    4-Master of ceremonies and games

    A pig can dream :daydreaming:
    Over a year later and I'm a little smarter, a little wiser, a little fitter, a lot more pub going (didn't think it was possible) but hardly any more glorious in the CV department.

    Le bugger.
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    I can't believe being a runner up for a national prize counts for nothing on the MTAS form!
 
 
 
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