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    (Original post by Kingofhearts92)
    There seems to be no one on here whos proud to be British,apart from me. People are saying that the U.K is boring and our economy is bad,but ive lived in both Italy and the U.S.A,and they are,in my opinion are worse. No dont get me wrong,i love travelling,i love different cultures,but just because someone a place is sunny,doesnt mean its a good place to live. Im content here and as a hopeful Archaeology student,i couldnt be in a better country!! what are your thoughts?
    Not only am I proud to be British, but I feel that we are one of the greatest nations in existence. Look at the size of the isles, our population, and compare that to our level of accomplishment. We have conquered most of the world, in spite of our meagre population; we have several of the finest educational institutions in the world; we have produced many of the greatest writers, thinkers, scientists, inventors, chefs, comics etc.

    Apart from the ancient Greeks and Romans, few places can claim to have accomplished quite as much.
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    I'm not proud of anything I haven't acheived. Being British isn't an accomplishment, is genetical roullette. Being dropped out of your mums vagina on a certain island isn't an accomplishment, you're just lucky she didn't do it somewhere worse. Getting good exam results, getting a promotion and winning a gold at the olympics are accomplishments and things you should be proud of.

    Proud, no. Happy, yes.
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    (Original post by INTJ)
    Not only am I proud to be British, but I feel that we are one of the greatest nations in existence. Look at the size of the isles, our population, and compare that to our level of accomplishment. We have conquered most of the world, in spite of our meagre population; we have several of the finest educational institutions in the world; we have produced many of the greatest writers, thinkers, scientists, inventors, chefs, comics etc.

    Apart from the ancient Greeks and Romans, few places can claim to have accomplished quite as much.
    I don't really see how thats relevant though. As I said, I love Britain but "we" didn't produce any of those. Either a handful of teachers did, or they just taught themselves. The average British person had nothing to do with it.

    As to conquering the world, I don't see that as necessarily a thing to be proud about. I'm sure hundreds of thousands (or maybe millions) of people were killed because of it - is that on the list as well?

    I just see Britain as a modern country who looks after it's people and helps others in times of emergency, is welcoming and tolerant of others and works to promote freedom across the world. This is something a lot of countries do so there is nothing inparticular to make Britain special.
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    (Original post by Jackthevillain)
    Proud to be English not so much British.
    That sounds absurd. There are lots of reasons to be proud of Britain - the NHS, a society that values and seeks to protect equality and human rights, a legal system that is not based on Biblical notions of vengeance, among many other things. England is, well, a non-entity. It hasn't existed or done anything for over 300 years. What is it about England that makes you proud of it?
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    It's impossible for me to be proud of somewhere I was involuntarily born into... but am I glad I was born here? Yes, I am. Sure we have our flaws, but so does every country, everywhere you go you'll end up complaining about the government or healthcare or education at some point. We're a very smart, tolerant country with a great history. I think British culture is great, and I wouldn't feel at home anywhere else to be honest.
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    I'm not British, but it's nice to see that most of you are proud. Some people who keep complaining about little things just need to go over to Rwanda and similar countries and see what's going on there. Maybe afterwards they would realize in what kind of place they live. However, it's the British music, at which every Brit should be proud of! And chavs.
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    (Original post by Steezy)
    I'm not proud of anything I haven't acheived. Being British isn't an accomplishment, is genetical roullette. Being dropped out of your mums vagina on a certain island isn't an accomplishment, you're just lucky she didn't do it somewhere worse. Getting good exam results, getting a promotion and winning a gold at the olympics are accomplishments and things you should be proud of.

    Proud, no. Happy, yes.
    Of course not, and nobody is saying that that's the case. I'm proud of Britain's post-WW2 achievements. I'm not proud of myself for being British, because that would be ludicrous. I'm proud of the country's collective achievements.
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    I'm very proud to be British, although I love other countries and would like to spend time living in them.

    I'd be proud of my nationality regardless though, whatever it was.
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    (Original post by callum9999)
    I don't really see how thats relevant though. As I said, I love Britain but "we" didn't produce any of those. Either a handful of teachers did, or they just taught themselves. The average British person had nothing to do with it.

    As to conquering the world, I don't see that as necessarily a thing to be proud about. I'm sure hundreds of thousands (or maybe millions) of people were killed because of it - is that on the list as well?

    I just see Britain as a modern country who looks after it's people and helps others in times of emergency, is welcoming and tolerant of others and works to promote freedom across the world. This is something a lot of countries do so there is nothing inparticular to make Britain special.
    1. If you discount what great British people did, because they are not the "average British" person, then you could say the same for almost every other country - that it was not your 'average' citizen who did it, so therefore it is irrelevant. If the person is British, it counts as a triumph for Britain; same rule for every other country.

    2. Yes, conquering most of the world with a population the size or our's IS an accomplishment. Morality and ethics have nothing to do with it. However you look at it, it was an exceptional feat of military mastery, technological genius and British planning. I'm not saying good came about it (though, some did), but it cannot be ignored how incredible the feat was.

    3. Most countries are NOWHERE NEAR as tolerant as Britain. Some, yes; but most, no.
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    (Original post by Teveth)
    That sounds absurd. There are lots of reasons to be proud of Britain - the NHS, a society that values and seeks to protect equality and human rights, a legal system that is not based on Biblical notions of vengeance, among many other things. England is, well, a non-entity. It hasn't existed or done anything for over 300 years. What is it about England that makes you proud of it?
    I dont consider myself British though because I have no connection to other British nations so just class myself as English. However England is a depressing place to live in modern times so hopefully im getting out in 2011.
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    i'm quite happy that I'm Welsh, i wouldn't go as far as saying proud.

    but yeah, i like being British.
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    I have always said that it is a spurious thing to be "proud" of one's nationality. I enjoy living in Britain, I enjoy the water, which is far better than what we drink in Lagos, Nigeria, and all of my best experiences have been in this country. I could think of no other place I would rather live, and, to quote Andrew Marr, "despite all its setbacks, it still remains, in the 21st century, a fantastic stroke of luck to be British." But I think that 'pride' is a dangerous word to use.

    Chinua Achebe implied in his poem 'Vultures' that it was the deepest love of one's country and family which drove the Nazi commandant at Belsen to order the atrocities that he did. I wholly agree with him, and would like to use that as an example of the broader issue raised by jingoism- that claiming one's own country is the best, a form of arrogance first of all, can lead to the development of hierarchy between nations. Was it not this same attitude which led to the formation of our empire? (I believe Cecil Rhodes used this as the justification for taking the former Rhodesia) The extreme right in this country believe they have hijacked true conservatism by saying that they protect British values. That seems like a justification for oppression of minority groups to me, to those who can't be said to espouse "British" values. That phrase can be bent to mean anything.

    I'd like to ask a question of people on TSR. How can anyone in 2010, where no country's culture is its own but is instead an amalgam of everywhere else's, where lines of race and ethnicity are blurred, where it is difficult in some cases to trace the precise location of a practice or saying to a nation, call themselves British? We are, arguably, as American (our music, our films), or Chinese (every good in your household) or African/Carribean (where 30% of the premiership is Black) as we are British. Speaking of society as "British" would require us to look at certain aspects of it and decide where current social norms concerning that aspect come from. As I've just suggested, many of those origins will be outside of these isles.

    Gordon Brown, an incredibly intelligent man, tried to tackle the difficulty of defining precisely what the term meant by speaking of values long connected by connotation to the word, but did, imo, a poor job. Not because he didn't think it through but because the topic is far more nebulous, far more clouded, than people give it credit for.

    In short (sorry for the rant) I can be proud of the things that my country has produced, I can be proud of the things that my country has done, but I cannot be proud of my country just because it is my country.
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    I'm proud to be English.
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    (Original post by Kingofhearts92)
    There seems to be no one on here whos proud to be British,apart from me. People are saying that the U.K is boring and our economy is bad,but ive lived in both Italy and the U.S.A,and they are,in my opinion are worse. No dont get me wrong,i love travelling,i love different cultures,but just because someone a place is sunny,doesnt mean its a good place to live. Im content here and as a hopeful Archaeology student,i couldnt be in a better country!! what are your thoughts?
    Ditto, I'm British and a archaeology student too (actually as my siggy shows I'm actually specialising in Egyptian but I've worked on many British sites and England has a strong archaeological heritage). My mum always is enthusiastic with British traditional events and whenever they play God Save the Queen for Remembrance Day etc she stands up. But generally apart from those occasions don't really do anything to express it, though it would be good if more people did have flags on display without it seeming somehow wrong or weird outside of football. I think pride for our country is something that would help strengthen our identity...I mean to other cultures we're reknown as tea drinkers etc but it doesn't seem to be a good thing to be open to our qualities as a British person, and those that are are often stereotyped as 'old fashioned'. Well I've met the Princess Royal and spoke to her and was proud of that. Others may think differently, but its all part of Britain
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    proud to be british and our multicultural nation (bait anyone?)
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    yes! I am.
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    (Original post by Jackthevillain)
    I dont consider myself British though because I have no connection to other British nations so just class myself as English. However England is a depressing place to live in modern times so hopefully im getting out in 2011.
    I don't know where about in England you are from, but you could equally say that you have no connection to other English counties apart from your own (assuming you have not lived in others), so instead just class yourself as [insert county name here].

    Is a someone from Madrid not a Spaniard because he has no connection to Andalusia or Catalonia? Is a man from Hamburg not a German because he has no connection to Bavaria? Is a man born and Bred in California not an American because he has no connection to other US states?
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    (Original post by Ab1odun)
    I have always said that it is a spurious thing to be "proud" of one's nationality. I enjoy living in Britain, I enjoy the water, which is far better than what we drink in Lagos, Nigeria, and all of my best experiences have been in this country. I could think of no other place I would rather live, and, to quote Andrew Marr, "despite all its setbacks, it still remains, in the 21st century, a fantastic stroke of luck to be British." But I think that 'pride' is a dangerous word to use.

    Chinua Achebe implied in his poem 'Vultures' that it was the deepest love of one's country and family which drove the Nazi commandant at Belsen to order the atrocities that he did. I wholly agree with him, and would like to use that as an example of the broader issue raised by jingoism- that claiming one's own country is the best, a form of arrogance first of all, can lead to the development of hierarchy between nations. Was it not this same attitude which led to the formation of our empire? (I believe Cecil Rhodes used this as the justification for taking the former Rhodesia) The extreme right in this country believe they have hijacked true conservatism by saying that they protect British values. That seems like a justification for oppression of minority groups to me, to those who can't be said to espouse "British" values. That phrase can be bent to mean anything.

    I'd like to ask a question of people on TSR. How can anyone in 2010, where no country's culture is its own but is instead an amalgam of everywhere else's, where lines of race and ethnicity are blurred, where it is difficult in some cases to trace the precise location of a practice or saying to a nation, call themselves British? We are, arguably, as American (our music, our films), or Chinese (every good in your household) or African/Carribean (where 30% of the premiership is Black) as we are British. Speaking of society as "British" would require us to look at certain aspects of it and decide where current social norms concerning that aspect come from. As I've just suggested, many of those origins will be outside of these isles.

    Gordon Brown, an incredibly intelligent man, tried to tackle the difficulty of defining precisely what the term meant by speaking of values long connected by connotation to the word, but did, imo, a poor job. Not because he didn't think it through but because the topic is far more nebulous, far more clouded, than people give it credit for.

    In short (sorry for the rant) I can be proud of the things that my country has produced, I can be proud of the things that my country has done, but I cannot be proud of my country just because it is my country.
    Great post and very well put. I'd rep you but I'm all out.
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    British? I call myself English, so no!

    Proud? That's a funny one, it was just by chance that I was born here, so can I really be proud of that?
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    I wish I was at least part British. But alas, I'm not. lol.
 
 
 
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