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Will the rise in tuition fees deter you from attending uni? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Has the rise deterred you?
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    Anyone who concludes that paying £27k in tuition fees (with the most cushy repayment plan ever) won't benefit in the long run in their career, sounds like they'd be better off not going to be honest. It's unfortunate, but there needs to be SOME sort of barrier to university entry, so that university isn't the arms race for social mobility that it is today, but actually a place of learning and career development.

    I just don't get the argument that people from working class backgrounds will be deterred. Other than their own ambitions, they have nothing hindering them.

    I just wish I could get a student loan for a second degree since I want to back and study medicine without depending on my parents. Saving up almost £100k by myself would be impossible. I wish there were private student loans.
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    Would you call me Philosophy and Politics a mickey mouse degree, as thats what I applied to do. Oh and honestly, as im not going to be affected by them, no. However i'd have doubts if i was next year's applicants.
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    (Original post by SamiFFXIII)
    Would you call me Philosophy and Politics a mickey mouse degree, as thats what I applied to do. Oh and honestly, as im not going to be affected by them, no. However i'd have doubts if i was next year's applicants.
    No, I wouldn't consider that a mickey mouse degree...
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    (Original post by Pegasus2)
    Whether or not you pay anything now or later makes little difference, at the end of the day you still have to pay it. In fact, it would be better to pay now as you skip the intrest.

    but after your run of the mill BSc, you'll be looking at about £32,000 thats still got to be paid by you and in the end you'll probably end up nearer £37,000 after so much interest. Thats a lot of debt to be contending with and will take a least 8 or so years to pay off. When you graduate you don't start on 40k as some people make out, think £20k if your lucky.

    Its a far bigger risk to undertake than it was before, so all thats happening is the Gov is trying to get less people to go whilst at the same time dump the entire systems costs on students so that its one less thing to fund.

    People faught for free eduation for a very long time, its the only way poor people can escape poverty and they won't if they have to pay 9 grand a year for it.


    Just to add, students I know struggle to pay of their 3k a year debt at the moment and one guy im taking about is on about £21k.
    How is it a risk? If you don't get a job, you're not paying anything back until you do. The threshold has got higher, too. I don't know what it is exactly but it's not like we'll be paying back huge amounts at a time anyway unless of course you have an enormous pay cheque, which most of us won't.

    To be honest the points you're making don't even make any sense. Poor people have fought for free education, and now because of this they'll never escape poverty? Why's that? They're paying back LESS per month than they would have been in the old scheme, they're not paying the fees upfront... Where, in that, are they forever trapped in poverty? If "poor people" go to university, get a degree and end up with a good job, they'll be earning money, right? The proportion of wage that goes to paying back student loans is not very high at all.
    I really think you need to look into this more.
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    (Original post by ktlaurenroe)
    How is it a risk? If you don't get a job, you're not paying anything back until you do. The threshold has got higher, too. I don't know what it is exactly but it's not like we'll be paying back huge amounts at a time anyway unless of course you have an enormous pay cheque, which most of us won't.

    To be honest the points you're making don't even make any sense. Poor people have fought for free education, and now because of this they'll never escape poverty? Why's that? They're paying back LESS per month than they would have been in the old scheme, they're not paying the fees upfront... Where, in that, are they forever trapped in poverty? If "poor people" go to university, get a degree and end up with a good job, they'll be earning money, right? The proportion of wage that goes to paying back student loans is not very high at all.
    I really think you need to look into this more.
    If the debt is left for longer the interest stacks up. Okay so the entire thing will be wiped clean after 30 years, let's see... we attend uni at 18, plus 30, that's 48, so our youthful debts will be written off years after we have the mid-life crisis?

    Those who go to university are those who look for serious, professional jobs and further promotions, do you think they'd just sit in the house until 30 years later the debt will be cleaned? Will you be content with spending so much in university then just settling for some job with an annual salary of less than £20,000? Electricians make more than that! Why don't they just go to college then?

    The early twentieth century saw universities seeking students for their money, after all it's paid education, the late twentieth century saw universities looking for those with real talent, and now at the early twenty-first century we've reverted back by 100 years!

    Those who hasn't been in poverty can't understand the thought processes of those who are in poverty, and those who have poorer backgrounds would rather go to the cheap colleges than burdening their families, or even themselves for an over-hyped HE. Ambitions? Ambitions are based on realistic circumstances, and to poor families college is a far better choice than university.
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    (Original post by xesolor)

    Those who hasn't been in poverty can't understand the thought processes of those who are in poverty, and those who have poorer backgrounds would rather go to the cheap colleges than burdening their families, or even themselves for an over-hyped HE. Ambitions? Ambitions are based on realistic circumstances, and to poor families college is a far better choice than university.
    In what way at all? Have you even read the facts on this?

    If they literally can't understand the amazingly simple process of paying back the loan, they shouldn't be going.
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    (Original post by xesolor)
    If the debt is left for longer the interest stacks up. Okay so the entire thing will be wiped clean after 30 years, let's see... we attend uni at 18, plus 30, that's 48, so our youthful debts will be written off years after we have the mid-life crisis?

    Those who go to university are those who look for serious, professional jobs and further promotions, do you think they'd just sit in the house until 30 years later the debt will be cleaned? Will you be content with spending so much in university then just settling for some job with an annual salary of less than £20,000? Electricians make more than that! Why don't they just go to college then?

    The early twentieth century saw universities seeking students for their money, after all it's paid education, the late twentieth century saw universities looking for those with real talent, and now at the early twenty-first century we've reverted back by 100 years!

    Those who hasn't been in poverty can't understand the thought processes of those who are in poverty, and those who have poorer backgrounds would rather go to the cheap colleges than burdening their families, or even themselves for an over-hyped HE. Ambitions? Ambitions are based on realistic circumstances, and to poor families college is a far better choice than university.
    None of those points particularly relate to my post so I'm not entirely sure why you quoted me...

    I don't even know what you're trying to imply, that if people go to University they won't be making more than electrician afterwards? You literally make no sense and apparently know nothing that serves any real relevance to this topic.

    Anyway, words are pretty much beyond me at this point. If you can't understand the scheme after all this time (and presumably after reading this thread), then perhaps you shouldn't be going to University. If you're going to end your education at college, as you appear to be in the mindset that college is a "far better" choice than Uni, have fun. I hope it works out for you and let me know about the types of jobs you're getting with A-Levels that clearly will be paying a lot more than jobs that require a degree.
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    I'm already at uni, but doing the first half of my degree in Scotland at £3k per year and the second half of my degree in England and am very worried about the potential 9k per year fees for the second half of my degree
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    It's possible that I may have to defer entry to university this year due to my illness. I come from a low income family, due to my grandfather living with us as he has dementia. I am still however absolutely going ahead with getting to university, regardless of the fee rise that I may have to face. As others have said, the student loan is probably the best loan you will ever get in your lifetime, and if you really want to study at university, the rise in fees shouldn't make you consider otherwise.
    Sure we may have to adapt to certain changes in our lifestyle to cope with debts, but if you believe you can succeed well through university and go into the world of work with a good degree, then the rise in fees should just be something that you can deal with as it comes.

    It'd be reaaaaly nice though if I do end up being able to go to university for 2011 entry
 
 
 
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