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Tuition fees in other countries Watch

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    (Original post by NJA)
    I would like to know how our national peers deal with funding for tertiary education:

    France

    Germany

    Ireland

    Scandanavia

    Italy

    USA

    Australia

    NewZealand
    I'm from Germany and you can study there for free, no matter where you are from. And the most important thing: You can study in English there as well.

    The only negative thing: It is by far not as recognised as a degree from a UK university. If you want to stay in Continental Europe or Germany, then it's good for you. If you want to stay outside continental Europe, then it won't be as beneficial for you.

    Scandinavia is also free. At least Norway that's what I know. And there you can also study in English.

    One reason for studying abroad: Less tuition fees or no tuition fees at all

    Reasons against: Living costs, a certain level of language you need to know, because you won't be at university 24/7 and when you go around town, etc. you will need the country's language skills as well.
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    Well. Just for laughs:-

    I am currently studying Economics at Delhi University with a tuition fee of about 5000 INR per year. That is about 70 pounds per year. :P
    Beat that.

    But, I applied to the UK for Economics this year and have a conditional offer from UCL and now I may suddenly shift from paying 70 pounds per year as tuition fee to around 14,000 pounds. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Medic-11)
    Except the fact that Cambridge is ranked 1st in the world...
    And UCL 4th...
    And Oxford 6th...
    And ICL 7th...
    And KCL 21st...
    And Edinburgh 22nd...
    And Bristol 27th...
    And Manchester 30th...

    With Finland's top ranked being 75th...
    That ranking is totally biased. Check out a ranking carried out by an American institution or newspaper. You won't find barely any British University in the top 50(except Oxbridge and one or two more). The best ranking is the one carried out by the Shanghai Jiao Tong University.. Quite a few British unis can be found in the top 100, that is undeniable.

    Nevertheless, rankings are not a reliable way of comparing universities.

    Plus, British/American Universities have got a great competitive advantage - they teach in English, the world's lingua franca. But there are many Universities that are 'world-class' and don't teach in English. And I think they are affected in the rankings because of that. But hey, that's just me.
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    (Original post by Summergirl.x)
    If you're thinking of studying abroad, anywhere in Europe you can expect to pay the exact same amount as the native students. Due to EU law you are treated the same as them.
    France is about €800 per year unless you're at a "Grande Ecole" which are their best uni's, these ones are about €8,000 to €9,000 a year but it depends on your parents income and how many siblings you have.

    USA fees for public unis are still like twice what we pay here, but the private ones, are even more. For places like Harvard I think it's like $40,000 a year or something ridiculous like that.
    How about australia for international students?
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    (Original post by The Cornerstone)
    How about australia for international students?
    No idea.. but if you're thinking of going there.. remember you should include travelling costs as well.. because they would cost a bomb.
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      UK students too reluctant to study abroad, says British Council.
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      I'm from France and want to study in the UK because
      -schools are more prestigious (the ones I applied to anyways)
      -better chance of getting in good schools, whereas in France if you want to do a grande ecole (the french equivalent of UCL, LSE, Oxbridge...) you have to do 2 years of prepa (pros: they're free! and the teaching isn't that bad-if you speak french, that is, cons: 2-3 years of intensive work (no time for anything else, don't think about continuing many-if any- activities), you're not even sure to get a grande ecole, because you might end up failing the exams to get into each school as they are extremely hard; and if you don't get into a good prepa (very competitive to get in) you might not get prepared well enough to succeed in the top grande ecole's exams) Of course if you manage all that, and are an extremely brilliant student, studying in France is very rewarding, with top jobs after grande ecoles, international reputation, great salaries and maybe a tiny loan (but the little it costs is often paid for by the parents if they can)
      -or you do a universite (called fac) which is not free, but not expensive either (don't know the exact price but way cheaper than the uk), but not very prestigious, unless you do really well, it's more the medium careers, and it's more to work in France, I don't know how successful youd be returning to the uk with a french diploma
      The big minus point for you UK people for studying in France would be the language barrier (otherwise it's win win, cheap fees, good quality teaching, and just 3 hours away by train), because you really HAVE TO SPEAK FRENCH!! (Most french are useless at english!)
      Anyways, good luck with your universities, and I hope you are all still ver attracted to wonderful France!
      I personally think that if you are a good student, you would be more successful studying in the UK, and though I think the increase in tuition fees is preposterous, you'll have to live with it. We in France would have been out in the streets 6 months ahead to make sure such an abominable increase wouldn't take place!
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      (Original post by The Cornerstone)
      How about australia for international students?
      I can't remember off the top of my head but they were huge - higher than international students pay here I think (for the courses I was looking at anyway). Though everything in Australia is more expensive anyway, so it's probably about the same/if not cheaper than here relative to their earnings.

      I don't think you can qualify for any support either, so you need to have the money ready upfront.
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      (Original post by Summergirl.x)
      Ah okay, well SciencePo is the prices I mentioned though. I know that for sure.
      As far as I know, only the IEP of Paris has such high fees. The other 8 are free, like most Grandes Écoles.
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      I'm currently studying in Germany on an erasmus year. The fees here for Germans are the same as for international students. Fees charged vary between the Länder, where I am in Rheinland Pflaz it is free. In the neighbouring land of Hessen fees have recently been introduced, so there is an influx of students from Frankfurt coming to Mainz.

      Some of the top universities:
      Heidelberg (oldest in Germany, member of LERU along with Oxford, Cambridge, Imperial, UCL and Edinburgh): €1200 pa
      FU Berlin (6th in Europe for arts and humanities according to Times Higher Education 2010): no fees
      Ludwig Maximilian Uni Munich (2010 number 13 in Europe in Academic Ranking of World Universities): €500 per semester
      Freiburg (6th in Europe for natural sciences): €500 per semester.

      As regards language, if you are going to be following a course which is in German then you obviously need some proficiency in German. However, some courses are offered in English although it does limit your choice of modules somewhat. You'll still need some German, of course, unless you plan to be a recluse and not talk to anybody, not go anywhere etc.

      Tuition, I have found, is actually better than what I've experienced at home. Apart from lectures, but that may just be the lecturer I have... In seminars expect to be giving at least one presentation per term.

      Besides, not speaking the language shouldn't be a deal breaker. It should be an impetus to learn rather than sit isolated on our little island cutting ourselves off from our European neighbours!
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      Yeah - but specially in university towns there shouldn´t be a problem with the language. We are used to international students and lecturers who only speak english and...japanese, chinese etc :P Also most of the texts are in english anyway.

      But as someone said - it limits the choice of study programes or moduls.


      And of course you could come to germany and study at the http://www.jacobs-university.de/
      The fees are 18.000 Euro/year - or including Room, boarding, and ticket for bus/rail in Bremen it´s 22.820 Euro/year. :P
      There you really don´t need any german.
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      France - around 300 euros - 250 pounds

      But, you have no stuff to work, you just have teachers, no laboratory, no campus, no student union, ...
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        France's universities are underfunded anyway.
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        (Original post by callum9999)
        I can't remember off the top of my head but they were huge - higher than international students pay here I think (for the courses I was looking at anyway). Though everything in Australia is more expensive anyway, so it's probably about the same/if not cheaper than here relative to their earnings.

        I don't think you can qualify for any support either, so you need to have the money ready upfront.
        Yeah, I checked Adelaide and their costs were about 12 000 pounds! And higher for medicine.

        I only thought about Australia because I thought it would be a nice place to live. But I want to stick to england for studying and then after maybe check out auutralia.
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        (Original post by Victor-PP)
        That ranking is totally biased. Check out a ranking carried out by an American institution or newspaper. You won't find barely any British University in the top 50(except Oxbridge and one or two more). The best ranking is the one carried out by the Shanghai Jiao Tong University.. Quite a few British unis can be found in the top 100, that is undeniable.

        Nevertheless, rankings are not a reliable way of comparing universities.

        Plus, British/American Universities have got a great competitive advantage - they teach in English, the world's lingua franca. But there are many Universities that are 'world-class' and don't teach in English. And I think they are affected in the rankings because of that. But hey, that's just me.
        Just looking at those rankings for British Universities only, it ranks the likes of Sussex/Liverpool/Leeds over Durham/Warwick/LSE, hardly looking accurate in any way or form.
       
       
       
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