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UK student applying to US FINANCE HELP? Watch

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    (Original post by Sem193)
    How can you pay for attending a US university then? I would really like to know.
    Well thats the thing, you have to have the money (or be willing to take on high interest bank loans - not low interest government loans which are not available).

    At the end of the day, its YOUR choice in wanting to study in the US, as you can study for a lot cheaper (and with government support) here in the UK - so you have to decide whether the value of a US education over a UK education, warrants paying the substantially higher fees. Its not like the US is your only option, you're actively making a choice to study there, so be prepared to pay for it.

    Unless you have the money or someone willing to take on the loans for you, the US remains but a dream I'm afraid.
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    (Original post by Sem193)
    How can you pay for attending a US university then? I would really like to know.
    Ditto to what manchild says.

    IMO the value in Oxbridge beats the 250k sticker at every ivy league.
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    (Original post by adam0311)
    Ditto to what manchild says.

    IMO the value in Oxbridge beats the 250k sticker at every ivy league.
    I was specifically talking about non Ivy League universities in my post above - the Ivy's are actually very generous with their aid, even to internationals. Its actually better value for money to attend the Ivy League than Oxbridge in fact.

    I have a friend attending Harvard and another Princeton, both of whom are internationals with incomes of about £40k each (combined parents income that is), and their paying a fraction of the price for a much better education - in my opinion, this quite easily beats the value of Oxbridge (particularly when you also then begin to consider the lack of facilities at Oxbridge when compared to the Ivy's and other such matters etc).

    Thus in my view, the value of an Ivy League education quite easily trumps that of Oxbridge.
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    (Original post by manchild007)
    I was specifically talking about non Ivy League universities in my post above - the Ivy's are actually very generous with their aid, even to internationals. Its actually better value for money to attend the Ivy League than Oxbridge in fact.

    I have a friend attending Harvard and another Princeton, both of whom are internationals with incomes of about £40k each (combined parents income that is), and their paying a fraction of the price for a much better education - in my opinion, this quite easily beats the value of Oxbridge (particularly when you also then begin to consider the lack of facilities at Oxbridge when compared to the Ivy's and other such matters etc).

    Thus in my view, the value of an Ivy League education quite easily trumps that of Oxbridge.
    How do you come to this conclusion considering you've attended neither?

    And what facilities are you talking about?
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    (Original post by manchild007)
    I was specifically talking about non Ivy League universities in my post above - the Ivy's are actually very generous with their aid, even to internationals. Its actually better value for money to attend the Ivy League than Oxbridge in fact.

    I have a friend attending Harvard and another Princeton, both of whom are internationals with incomes of about £40k each (combined parents income that is), and their paying a fraction of the price for a much better education - in my opinion, this quite easily beats the value of Oxbridge (particularly when you also then begin to consider the lack of facilities at Oxbridge when compared to the Ivy's and other such matters etc).

    Thus in my view, the value of an Ivy League education quite easily trumps that of Oxbridge.
    I thought you were talking about Ivy League universities! I only want to apply to Ivy League universities. I was so depressed when you was talking about how the websites I posted were useless, lol.
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    (Original post by adam0311)
    How do you come to this conclusion considering you've attended neither?
    Isn't this hypocrisy at its best? How do you come to your conclusion considering you've attended neither?

    As for my own research on the matter - I attended Eton here in the UK, a school which allowed me to have PLENTY of contact with Oxbridge and its quirks from a very very early age.

    As for facilities and Oxbridge's utter lack of them when compared to the Ivy's, there is honestly to much to name. These can be anything from sporting facilities/stadiums for example (despite rowing being central to Oxbridge and perhaps its main sport as an instance, their facilities pale in comparison to that of the boathouses and training grounds I saw at Yale and even a few other lower-Ivys, not to mention the support staff). Other facilities include those for research for example - if I study Biology/Chem/Physics at the Ivy's they all have dedicated centres to allow UNDERGRADUATES to engage in research even as freshman (and in fact emphasise the research aspect in their educations for undergraduates), whereas in Oxbridge, if your in your final year or penultimate year and have a good relationship with a professor, you'd be lucky to get one. Politics is another example, as most of the Ivy's have dedicated facilities to allow students to take up internships in Washington/UK Parliament, something neither Oxford or Cambridge has (unless you have the personal connections from your family for such internships that is). These are just SOME of the examples….
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    (Original post by Sem193)
    I thought you were talking about Ivy League universities! I only want to apply to Ivy League universities. I was so depressed when you was talking about how the websites I posted were useless, lol.
    Those websites are useless - unless you've applied to Harvard, Princeton or Yale, you're in the same position about funding your education; i.e. you'll need the $60k or so a year in fees. Only the 3 aforementioned colleges are need-blind to international students, so for any of the other Ivy's, you'll still have to secure funding from somewhere - such as personal money or loans etc.
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    (Original post by manchild007)
    Isn't this hypocrisy at its best? How do you come to your conclusion considering you've attended neither?

    As for my own research on the matter - I attended Eton here in the UK, a school which allowed me to have PLENTY of contact with Oxbridge and its quirks from a very very early age.

    As for facilities and Oxbridge's utter lack of them when compared to the Ivy's, there is honestly to much to name. These can be anything from sporting facilities/stadiums for example (despite rowing being central to Oxbridge and perhaps its main sport as an instance, their facilities pale in comparison to that of the boathouses and training grounds I saw at Yale and even a few other lower-Ivys, not to mention the support staff). Other facilities include those for research for example - if I study Biology/Chem/Physics at the Ivy's they all have dedicated centres to allow UNDERGRADUATES to engage in research even as freshman (and in fact emphasise the research aspect in their educations for undergraduates), whereas in Oxbridge, if your in your final year or penultimate year and have a good relationship with a professor, you'd be lucky to get one. Politics is another example, as most of the Ivy's have dedicated facilities to allow students to take up internships in Washington/UK Parliament, something neither Oxford or Cambridge has (unless you have the personal connections from your family for such internships that is). These are just SOME of the examples….
    Well when you come here you'll notice how sports are a big ******* deal in comparison. This probably explains the discrepancy in sporting facilities. Especially considering that schools here get substantial amounts of money the better their NCAA programs are.

    With regards to undergraduate research, out of all the kids in my HS who went to ivys or top LACs/publics with the intent of research in mind...the only one who got onto a lab from day one was at a LAC. In reality you will have to get "tight" with a professor if you want to do anything meaningful.

    And with regards to internships---I think this is another one that stems from cultural differences in education. The US treats college as vocational training....I find the UK unis to be far more academic. Just so you know, you probably wouldn't have any access to internships in Washington. Most decent ones require citizenship.
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    (Original post by adam0311)
    …….
    Again, a post full of assumptions and misguided logic :rolleyes:

    First - are you honestly saying a sport like ROWING, is not important for investment to Oxbridge. ROWING!? I can fully understand poor facilities in other areas, but rowing -the sport either university is known for? Its not even a NCAA sport I believe in the US, and yet the top Ivy's have simply state-of-the-art equipment and supremely better facilities than Oxbridge. There are many other examples of better facilities than just this moreover.

    Regarding research - your experience is subjective, as is mine. Just as only "one" of your friends has done/engaged in research, virtually all but a few (who were never really interested in research to begin with) took part in research in either there freshman/sophomore years at the earliest - within the latest labs, with actual prominent/leading professors. This wasn't done through being "tight" with a professor, as such research opportunities were simply posted on the university research pages or advertised by professors to students within a subject group as a whole - you simply needed to apply and then get accepted (i.e. you would often need to write a brief essay on why you wanted to engage in this research and given the abundant amount of opportunities available, most were given them on a first come first serve basis, or at the very least, referred to other opportunities).

    As for internships in Washington, not that I would like to go into politics anyways, I am a dual US/UK citizen so I should be fine regarding citizenship thanks. Moreover, even those who can't work in Washington (though leading think tanks and other aspects of Washington are still very much open!), spending your freshman summer interning for George Osbourne here in the UK is a pretty sweet deal if your interested in politics - perhaps the best opportunity you can get at such a stage.

    I agree with you that the US has much more vocational approach to learning, one which I much prefer, but they also then supplement this with academic research - the best of both worlds in my view.
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    (Original post by manchild007)
    Again, a post full of assumptions and misguided logic :rolleyes:

    First - are you honestly saying a sport like ROWING, is not important for investment to Oxbridge. ROWING!? I can fully understand poor facilities in other areas, but rowing -the sport either university is known for? Its not even a NCAA sport I believe in the US, and yet the top Ivy's have simply state-of-the-art equipment and supremely better facilities than Oxbridge. There are many other examples of better facilities than just this moreover.

    Regarding research - your experience is subjective, as is mine. Just as only "one" of your friends has done/engaged in research, virtually all but a few (who were never really interested in research to begin with) took part in research in either there freshman/sophomore years at the earliest - within the latest labs, with actual prominent/leading professors. This wasn't done through being "tight" with a professor, as such research opportunities were simply posted on the university research pages or advertised by professors to students within a subject group as a whole - you simply needed to apply and then get accepted (i.e. you would often need to write a brief essay on why you wanted to engage in this research and given the abundant amount of opportunities available, most were given them on a first come first serve basis, or at the very least, referred to other opportunities).

    As for internships in Washington, not that I would like to go into politics anyways, I am a dual US/UK citizen so I should be fine regarding citizenship thanks. Moreover, even those who can't work in Washington (though leading think tanks and other aspects of Washington are still very much open!), spending your freshman summer interning for George Osbourne here in the UK is a pretty sweet deal if your interested in politics - perhaps the best opportunity you can get at such a stage.

    I agree with you that the US has much more vocational approach to learning, one which I much prefer, but they also then supplement this with academic resea
    rch - the best of both worlds in my view.

    Fair enough. If you think Yale had nice sport facilities, wait until you go to one of the big 10 schools or SEC schools...dude, its ridiculous.

    There is a difference between rowing and football though. Football at a school like Michigan brings 110k people per game. I'm guessing Yale brings 30k-60k a game. So no, rowing can't compare.
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    yeah most people in other state...
 
 
 
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