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If you're of an ethnic minority, how do you react to someone saying this Watch

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    (Original post by lukejoshjedi)
    As in someone not of ethnic minority, you've met, you're getting along and you start talking about personal things - your family, past schools, where you're from etc

    "So where are you from"

    You answer casually, seeing as you were born in the UK, nothing weird

    "No, but where are you from"

    You may think that's like straight from a comedy skit and it never actually happens but it does, anyway if you're asked that and you're from an ethnic minority, how do you / would you react?

    Anyone got real and funny experiences of a conversation like that they want to share?
    Well it's obvious they wanna know your ethnicity rather than which country you were born, I use this all the time when asking people. Hate it when they give the "From the UK" response, it's obvious that's not what I meant.
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    I just ask the ethnic minority member where their family is from. Saves any confusion.
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    At the airport in Cairo, I'm dark and most people thought I was Lebanese or something:

    Getting my residency visa stamped out:

    Officer "Where are you from?"
    Me: "Scotland"
    Officer "Where are you FROM? What's your origin?"
    Me: "Scotland!"
    Officer "Are you from arabic origin?"
    Me: "No.. just a resident"
    Officer switches to speaking in Arabic. So lol no I don't mind. People have to stop being so sensitive. Ethnicity is different from nationality and you can't change your ethnicity no matter where you were born, people don't mean it bad.
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    I'm from India.

    Despite being chinese
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    I tend to just give the appropriate answer to the question, not 'from the Uk' when that obviously isn't the question they're asking and then proceed to go around in a circle. It's very simple, I don't get why people kick up a fuss, it's not even remotely offensive.....
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    I just ask them to ask a less ambiguous question.
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    (Original post by yousif92)
    Yeah just tell them straight. Despite what ethnics may think, 99% of "white" people are not racist but simply curious...
    What does "ethnic" mean to you? You do realise that calling someone "ethnic" is completely retarded as everyone has an ethnicity.
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    Wouldn't think anything of it, it's just a way of phrasing a question, no aggressive intent meant.
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    (Original post by Panda Vinnie)
    I generally dislike answering this question to people.

    I'm of Arab decent (UAE to be specific) but was born in London and consider myself British rather than Arab....though I am proud to be part of both.

    The part I dislike is how the conversation usually goes (and believe me, during freshers every person said this same thing countless times):

    them: so where are you from?

    me: London, you?

    them: no as in, where your parents from...your ethnic background?

    me: Oh, they're from UAE...Dubai to be specific.

    them: oh wow, so you're arab

    me: yep

    them: mmmm loaded eh? I bet you have oil in your back yard :p:

    me: I wish

    them: I bet you dance along to "we gettin' arab moneyyyyyy"

    me: :dry:

    them:

    me: :dry:

    them: :K:

    me: :dry:

    Had to go through this same **** every day in freshers.
    Tbf if 99% of people meet an Arab guy (Dubau to be specific) from Kensington they will most probably assume he/his parents/his family is flossing
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    Depends who it is, if it's JS or MN then i'll say 'RIP JS AND RS AND MN'
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    (Original post by effofex)
    But you aren't 'originally' from there. By that logic I could be 'originally Persian' given that my paternal ancestors migrated across that part of the globe c. 2400 years ago.

    Surely this is like an American born person saying that he/she is 'originally German', rather than saying he/she is Amercan.

    You may be ethnically Sinhalese/Tamil/Moorish (or a mixture) but you are not 'from' Sri Lanka since you were not born there.

    So if people ask your ethnic group(s)/ancestry then you say your ethnic group(s); if people ask where your family are from then you say where they were born (could be quite alot of places if there's a diaspora); if people ask where you are from then you say where you were born.

    Since you are born in the UK and presumably hold UK citizenship, this means you are from the UK. Your ethnicity doesn't come into that question.
    :rolleyes: Where did you develop such an ego that you deemed yourself worthy to dish out seemingly conclusive advice on how everyone everywhere should respond to such a question? Where people are from is a personal choice and there is no definitive answer that someone should pick when posed this question. Someone may not be born in a certain country but can still most definitely feel that they are from there.
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      I don't really react. :lolwut:

      Though a few weeks ago, this guy who works in the shop near me asked where I was from and I told him. He also asked which part, so I replied.

      Then he said, "I don't like Gujus."

      I said I didn't like Tamils and he started laughing.
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      I get asked this a lot, i don't find it annoying at all. It's just confusing because when some one asks me "where are you from" i always pause for a minute to think of what to respond/what they want to know (since i was born and raised in England but ethnically from Somalia).
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      To be honest I don't get asked it often, although when I am I just reply where my family is from. I don't/ wouldn't take any offence.
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      (Original post by Tha_Black_Shinobi)
      :rolleyes: Where did you develop such an ego that you deemed yourself worthy to dish out seemingly conclusive advice on how everyone everywhere should respond to such a question? Where people are from is a personal choice and there is no definitive answer that someone should pick when posed this question. Someone may not be born in a certain country but can still most definitely feel that they are from there.
      How is this about ego? Surely it is about logic?

      If you are born in London how can you feel you are not from London? If people ask 'where you are from' they are not asking about your cultural, religious, political or ancestral background. They are most probably asking where you were born.

      If they wanted to know your ancestry, surely they would ask something to the effect of 'what is your ancestry?' or 'what is your ethnic origin?' instead. This is not about creating offence or being offended - but simply about being accurate.

      If you asked somebody who is born in London, but whose ancestors have lived in Lancashire for most of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries, the chances are they will still say they are from London (rather than Lancashire). They might still like pies though.
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      (Original post by qasman)
      Well it's obvious they wanna know your ethnicity rather than which country you were born, I use this all the time when asking people. Hate it when they give the "From the UK" response, it's obvious that's not what I meant.
      Why don't you just ask them what their ethnicity or ethnic origin(s) are, rather than posing a vague question?
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      This drives me mad, I get it all the time, especially with random people I've literally just met and will never meet again! I was born here and have always lived here so my answer is always London. Then if they say 'where are you from originally?' I tell them I was born here. If they specifically then ask where my parents and grandparents are from I'll tell them, although it's a bit nosey, but otherwise I will literally answer their question even if I know what they're getting at. I got it from some Indian cashiers in the supermarket a bit, who clearly were actually from India, and I thought it was a bit rude tbh - no I didn't want to bond with them over Indian-ness and it's not really a context-appropriate question!
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      (Original post by effofex)
      How is this about ego? Surely it is about logic?

      If you are born in London how can you feel you are not from London? If people ask 'where you are from' they are not asking about your cultural, religious, political or ancestral background. They are most probably asking where you were born.

      If they wanted to know your ancestry, surely they would ask something to the effect of 'what is your ancestry?' or 'what is your ethnic origin?' instead. This is not about creating offence or being offended - but simply about being accurate.

      If you asked somebody who is born in London, but whose ancestors have lived in Lancashire for most of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries, the chances are they will still say they are from London (rather than Lancashire). They might still like pies though.
      No it's personal, YOU can't dictate were people feel or say they are from.

      A lot of people do not think by your logic, has that not occured to you? It's not about being born here or their and feeling like you belong/don't belong. A lot of people still associate themselves with the countries they are ethnicaly from, even if they have lived in london all their live's, doesn't mean they feel like they are not from london.
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      (Original post by style)
      No it's personal, YOU can't dictate were people feel or say they are from.

      A lot of people do not think by your logic, has that not occured to you? It's not about being born here or their and feeling like you belong/don't belong. A lot of people still associate themselves with the countries they are ethnicaly from, even if they have lived in london all their live's, doesn't mean they feel like they are not from london.
      Well, of course anyone can answer any question how they wish. I cannot obviously dictate how they answer it.

      But surely if someone asks where you are from, and then if you answer by stating a nation that you have not been born in or lived in it may appear as though you have misinterpreted the question.

      Asking someone where they are from =/= asking their ethnic origin. People can not be born in multiple cities or multiple countries (in practice) BUT can still have heritage from a whole range of countries.

      Maybe the responsibility lies with whoever is asking the question to be more specific with what they want to know - i.e. ethnic origin/nationality/birthplace, rather than a vague 'Where are you from?'.
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      (Original post by lukejoshjedi)
      As in someone not of ethnic minority, you've met, you're getting along and you start talking about personal things - your family, past schools, where you're from etc

      "So where are you from"

      You answer casually, seeing as you were born in the UK, nothing weird

      "No, but where are you from"

      You may think that's like straight from a comedy skit and it never actually happens but it does, anyway if you're asked that and you're from an ethnic minority, how do you / would you react?

      Anyone got real and funny experiences of a conversation like that they want to share?
      How do you know they aren't just asking where you live?
     
     
     
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