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I feel alienated at university because of my social class... Watch

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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    No, I don't have any chip on my shoulder at all. I know some people who are like you described but, in fact I am (and both my parents are) conservative voters, my mother campaigns for the Conservation party in our local area and has done since she moved to this country. I also have friends who are very, very wealthy (who I get on with well) so to answer then no.
    Ah right, I really don't know then. :dontknow: That's just really unlucky I guess.

    Are they meaning to be horrible, or is it more accidental?
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    Hard to say, I found 'Rahs' to have a very inward looking, insular mentality, well that's pretty much the working definition of Rah-ness... it's almost as if they only want to give the time of day to someone who might be able to do them a favour after they graduate.

    and yeah I usually manage to get on with people from different backgrounds too so I don't think it's a generalised chip on my shoulder

    BTW is that a re-post... Just we're coming up to Christmas now not Summer.
    Well there are alot of rahs at my uni

    And the people talking about inverted snobbery clearly didnt understand my post
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    (Original post by .Ali.)
    I don't wish to be rude, but I want to ask you...do you have a bit of a chip on your shoulder about being working class?

    I'm middle class, and I have poorer friends, and richer friends. However, I've found a lot of people have personally been very rude to me, because "You're a f**king stuck up Tory, I hope daddy's credit card runs out and you fall flat on your arse. Posh prick" etc. Obviously that offends me, so I tend to reply with similar comments that are more relevant to them. These comments have been made to me when I've just opened my mouth and said something slightly intelligent, or they've seen some of the things I have. I even got called a 'rah' on here for wearing Jack Wills lol. :rolleyes:

    I'm not saying this is the case with you, but I've always found inverse snobbery to be far worse. However, I have at times (and still am) a bit oblivious to some of the difficulties of poorer people, it's not intentional though! So maybe these middle class people don't mean to upset you?

    I'm not trying to be offensive, but maybe lose the "I'm working class I won't fit in" thought system, and you might find it a lot better. As I've said, I have friends from working, middle, and upper classes, and we get on alright.
    Judging by your writing style, previous messages and your lame signature video i would classify you as Posh T W A T.
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    Maybe you are putting to much emphasis on the whole class thing. Im not sure that you really grasp class boundaries either, not many people would say that a 19 year old who has a boat and a landrover is middle class.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Well there are alot of rahs at my uni

    And the people talking about inverted snobbery clearly didnt understand my post
    Can you give some examples of where people have been deliberately condescending to you because of your class? Also, some idea of how you reacted? It's hard to know what to recommend otherwise
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    Stupidest discussion I have ever read. My word. This isn't class divides, it's stupid people looking for any other excuse other than the fact that they are stupid for not making friends.

    I'm as lower working class as it is possible to get, studied a prestigious degree at a good uni filled with public school students. The people that let stuff like class get in they way (regardless of what class they thought they were) nobody liked. Not because they were working class, or upper class. But because they were dull enough to be thinking about **** like class issues while everyone else is just getting on and making friends and doing their thing.

    Get a life people.
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    It sounds to me like you have a thing against the middle and upper classes. If all working class people at top universities dropped out because they felt inferior, they would be denying themselves fantastic degrees which would have hopefully have got them fantastic jobs. If kids from more modest backgrounds are put off applying to top universities because of a fear that they would not fit in, then more places will go to wealthier people and thus these wealthy kids will succeed, exacerbating the social divide and leaving many bright but lower class students kicking themselves that they didn't apply to or dropped out of a top university.

    Who knows, OP, maybe you'll get a brilliant degree and a high-paid job. When your kids are off to university themselves, how annoyed would you be if they were scorned for coming from a well-off family?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)

    TLDR: I didn't make any friends during my first year of Uni and I often clash with my well-off middle class housemates. I get on really well with all the working class people I've met at uni and I'm wondering if my class background prevents me from making close relationships.

    Cheers

    Thanks
    I am curious what uni you go to out of those mentioned (I assume it was one of them) but understand if you don't want to say for fear of fulling a rah reputation of it and thus perpetuating it.

    I go to ICL and I must admit I am one of the quintessential middle class right down to the love of tea, public schooling and RP accent. But I have a mix of friends from wealthier than me (significantly so) to the maximum maintenance. I seem to get on with every class in that sense. I have been told before I wasn't like people expected public schools boys to be like, I will take this as a compliment. I am not sure whether this is just me being the oddball of sorts though hmmm.
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    I would say that I am relatively middle class but have a more working class background - my family is by no means rich but we have a large flat in a nice area, my parents have fairly good jobs and we speak a certain way that conceals whether we're particularly rich or poor. Despite that it's not like we ever went on regular holidays abroad or had a lot to spare and we've never been spoilt - my parents would have found it difficult to do so even if they had wanted to. Both my parents came from different backgrounds. My father was brought up by very working class parents in a rough area. Someone recently refused to believe that he was from there purely based on his accent and appearance (both very middle of the road). My mother had a very middle class upbringing though both her parents came from families that were the very definition on working class. Both went to private schools, my dad due to a scholarship. I was always motivated to learn and most kids at my (state) primary school came from very similar backgrounds to me, though generally I imagine that we were in the lower half of the earnings scale. High school (also a state school) however was very different and in my first years there were very few people that had any motivation to do well. The majority of kids were from 'bad' areas and had most definitely been brought up with serious chips on their shoulders. Most were disruptive and unwilling to participate, bringing the chances of anyone actually learning anything down. In my class of 18 there were about 6 middle-class-ish people, 6 from a more working class background or area that were mostly well behaved and cooperative and 6 that made a fuss about everything and didn't see the point in working. All of the 'middle class' people were in the higher sets for academic subjects and were generally well behaved as were about half the working class ones. However if at any point any of us were rewarded in any way one of the rowdy kids would make a remark about us being 'snobs'. If one was put in a group with some of us there would be digs about not wanting to work with the 'snobs'. Nobody ever saw it fit to say that a snob is someone that thinks they are better than someone else or to point out that none of us had ever implied such a thing. It was very easy for this label to take hold and for the kids that weren't rowdy or disruptive to use it as an excuse for not doing things. I remember one girl that I had always liked and got on with referring to us as 'the snobs' and being really hurt by it. Interestingly enough five years later a group from my school did an exchange with one of the most prestigious private schools in the country and I think everyone was surprised at how well we all got on with each other.

    Class attitudes can be so negative. Personally I wouldn't judge someone much by class and instead the kind of social groups or stereotypes that they partake in seem more relevant to how we will get on as people. You can't say that people don't like you because they're middle class, it has to be because of a certain attitude that you or they have. Maybe you don't have a lot in common with some of these people, maybe some of them are snobbish and unwilling to associate with you, maybe you just don't have compatible personalities...I just feel personally that class should have very little to do with anything nowadays and it annoys me just as much when friends say that they wouldn't like to go to Oxbridge because it's full of posh people as it does when they make jokes about poor people.

    Sorry for the rant!
 
 
 
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