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    Although I haven't read most of the thread, I'm really surprised people seem to be having trouble socially and otherwise at LSE. I utterly love studying there.

    I'm a British Asian student (that lived both in Britain and India for substantial amounts of time) and I get along fine with the other Brits and Asians. Although I do see what some people say about LSE being cliquish, its all because people there (at least some of them) are painfully shy.

    Case and point: my friend (Pakistani) walked up to a girl from Hong Kong after lectures who never said a word to anyone outside of the Chinese group. They got to talking and now the Chinese girl hangs out with us majority of the time. Many a time her other Chinese friends tag along. The same has happened with some of our other friends who are entirely British, two Irish and one Welsh.

    The social scene is amazing!! I generally go out at least two nights a week, which could easily be more if I made the effort. We always go out after lecture (yeah only one) on Wednesday for lunch as a big group and its a blast!

    I've actually had very few problems with my teachers, if any at all. I'm a 1st year Law Student and I was apprehensive about many of the things I read on TSR about the teachers being bad and such, I've found the exact opposite! My class teachers have been generally brilliant and always willing to take time out for me (4/5 have been outstanding), but I have been told I hit the jackpot with teachers. *shrugs*

    Also the whole "teachers don't make time for you," well that's not true. If you really want to talk to a teacher, go on LSE4U, book an appointment with your teacher during their Office Hours and go and meet them! I've done that so many times now whenever I have had many issues with any one class. It has been extremely helpful. Yeah sometimes the Office Hours cut off with only 5 minute appointments or 10/15 minutes. But when you're at the appointment, you start asking questions, if you're not done but your appointment time is over, the teacher still sits with you for as long as it takes. When I had a meeting with my Obligations teacher, it was 15 minutes long. I ended up sitting with him for 45 minutes dissecting my essay and learning tons one-on-one and he didn't mind at all! If you need the help you have to take the initiative.

    Also societies and clubs are so much fun here! But I guess I'm not too much into sports and more on the academic fence of things... But the Debates, Literature, Drama societies have been great this year.

    Also nothing beats the opportunity of living in London! Yeah its expensive sometimes, but still worth it...

    LSE is what you make of it IMO. There are some genuinely amazing people here. Granted its not your typical Uni experience, but its a very intense environment where everyone works, studies, laughs and parties.
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    (Original post by danny111)
    No you could not.

    It is very common knowledge that the economics entries on Wikipedia are crap.

    It's not like the maths entries. I guess it's because economists understand opportunity cost and mathematicians don't. (or they are just a nicer breed of people...)


    Ha, I think you're missing my point though. Okay, any of the probably millions of good websites out there? The resources on moodle aren't even that great (especially for economics in my brief experience!). So how the hell somebody can use "independent learning opportunities" as some kind of twisted advantage to LSE I don't know. Yeah, I love having the opportunity to search online or go to a library. THANK YOU LSE for providing me with that option.

    Even if my argument is invalid for some reason, which it isn’t, for God sake, go to the open university if all you want to learn independently The teaching at LSE isn’t good. Many universities are better. The opportunities there for “independent learning” are the same.

    I’m not saying LSE is bad. But I am saying “abundant independent learning opportunities” is the most ridiculous pro for LSE I’ve ever heard.
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    (Original post by Tallon)
    Ha, I think you're missing my point though. Okay, any of the probably millions of good websites out there? The resources on moodle aren't even that great (especially for economics in my brief experience!). So how the hell somebody can use "independent learning opportunities" as some kind of twisted advantage to LSE I don't know. Yeah, I love having the opportunity to search online or go to a library. THANK YOU LSE for providing me with that option.

    Even if my argument is invalid for some reason, which it isn’t, for God sake, go to the open university if all you want to learn independently The teaching at LSE isn’t good. Many universities are better. The opportunities there for “independent learning” are the same.

    I’m not saying LSE is bad. But I am saying “abundant independent learning opportunities” is the most ridiculous pro for LSE I’ve ever heard.
    Hey, I just made a joke about wikipedia and economists.

    I didn't agree or disagree with your post.
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    (Original post by danny111)
    Hey, I just made a joke about wikipedia and economists.

    I didn't agree or disagree with your post.
    I know. Sorry, I wasn't raging out

    Is this a fair representation of LSE do you think?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovmHfMKHuY8
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    (Original post by Tallon)
    I know. Sorry, I wasn't raging out

    Is this a fair representation of LSE do you think?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovmHfMKHuY8
    Lol loadsa people posting this on facebook atm.

    I don't know.

    No it's not. A friend of mine last year wrote an article in the Beaver about the different people at LSE. I mean this fits to one certain group and very well so, but that group is not that big.
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    (Original post by Tallon)
    I know. Sorry, I wasn't raging out

    Is this a fair representation of LSE do you think?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovmHfMKHuY8
    LOL. I'm a member of all 3 societies he listed, though I don't do much. Sure there are people like him here but thats true of all the top uni's in the country
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    (Original post by Frontier)
    Yes, teaching is often poor. Last year, out of 4 teachers, only 1 of mine was good. This year this figure is 2 for me. You have to do a lot of independent study, I essentially taught myself a couple of modules last year. The online resources tend to be of high quality and of course so is the library, so if you are motivated you will have no issue.
    Hi,

    What course do you do? And do you think the "poor teaching" is the same for most undergraduate degrees at LSE?
    Thanks
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    the teachers are a mixed bag. some of them are great, most are average, and a few are terrible. the bad ones usually suffer from poor language skills. however, even in the worst cases this just makes going to class unneccessary. doing well comes down to self study either way, and (for quantitative courses) the solutions for problem sets will be posted on moodle. if you've studied the material, attempted the problem set, checked it against the solutions and you're still not sure there's always office hours.

    as for the lack of contact time, that's a pretty universal feature of social science and the humanities in the british university system
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    (Original post by arrowhead)
    Although I haven't read most of the thread, I'm really surprised people seem to be having trouble socially and otherwise at LSE. I utterly love studying there.

    LSE is what you make of it IMO. There are some genuinely amazing people here. Granted its not your typical Uni experience, but its a very intense environment where everyone works, studies, laughs and parties.
    congragulations, glad you like it. i love studying here as well, but it's the non-studying part of my day that i find unpleasant, and i believe LSE is largely responsible, given that i've met a much higher proportion of 'fun and interesting' people socializing with SOAS and UCL kids. if that hurts your ego i guess that's unfortunate.

    LSE offers one of the most stimulating - possibly, superlative is justified here, THE most stimulating - intellectual environments on the planet. if that's your thing, you will probably not find a better place outside oxbridge or havard/yale, possibly not even there.

    LSE's student body, on the other hand, leaves much to be desired. i'm a transfer student from the states, so i have a basis for comparison. i can tell you unequivocally that compared to where i went before, LSE's social life blows. socializing when it takes place at all tends to be formal and superficial. people tend to stick with their cliques, formed either in freshers' week or through friendships dating back to high school/british equivalent. the place is boring. lest you potential students get the wrong idea that i'm some kind of marginalized nutcase, i hate to inform you but that's the general stereotype - even on campus, that "LSE is boring" - and speaking for myself i've found it to be true.
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    (Original post by Lou_Ferrigno)
    congragulations, glad you like it. i love studying here as well, but it's the non-studying part of my day that i find unpleasant, and i believe LSE is largely responsible, given that i've met a much higher proportion of 'fun and interesting' people socializing with SOAS and UCL kids. if that hurts your ego i guess that's unfortunate.

    LSE offers one of the most stimulating - possibly, superlative is justified here, THE most stimulating - intellectual environments on the planet. if that's your thing, you will probably not find a better place outside oxbridge or havard/yale, possibly not even there.

    LSE's student body, on the other hand, leaves much to be desired. i'm a transfer student from the states, so i have a basis for comparison. i can tell you unequivocally that compared to where i went before, LSE's social life blows. socializing when it takes place at all tends to be formal and superficial. people tend to stick with their cliques, formed either in freshers' week or through friendships dating back to high school/british equivalent. the place is boring. lest you potential students get the wrong idea that i'm some kind of marginalized nutcase, i hate to inform you but that's the general stereotype - even on campus, that "LSE is boring" - and speaking for myself i've found it to be true.

    Pretty much sums up LSE.
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    I am so glad you asked this question cause I've applied to LSE too and wanted to know if the rumours were true.

    Now I need to wait for my offer :/
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    (Original post by Lou_Ferrigno)
    congragulations, glad you like it. i love studying here as well, but it's the non-studying part of my day that i find unpleasant, and i believe LSE is largely responsible, given that i've met a much higher proportion of 'fun and interesting' people socializing with SOAS and UCL kids. if that hurts your ego i guess that's unfortunate.

    LSE offers one of the most stimulating - possibly, superlative is justified here, THE most stimulating - intellectual environments on the planet. if that's your thing, you will probably not find a better place outside oxbridge or havard/yale, possibly not even there.

    LSE's student body, on the other hand, leaves much to be desired. i'm a transfer student from the states, so i have a basis for comparison. i can tell you unequivocally that compared to where i went before, LSE's social life blows. socializing when it takes place at all tends to be formal and superficial. people tend to stick with their cliques, formed either in freshers' week or through friendships dating back to high school/british equivalent. the place is boring. lest you potential students get the wrong idea that i'm some kind of marginalized nutcase, i hate to inform you but that's the general stereotype - even on campus, that "LSE is boring" - and speaking for myself i've found it to be true.
    Well, sorry to hear that mate. I do see where you're coming from though. My brief visit to Yale and Stanford last summer showed me a sample of what American Uni life seems like and LSE is very different from that. *shrugs* It is as it is and what you make of it. The Uni does very less to promote socialising, that is sad but true. I know that had I not gone out of my way to meet people and be generally intrusive until I found my 'place' as it were, I would potentially have had the same complaints as generally expressed here.

    C'est la vie I guess.
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    (Original post by arrowhead)
    Well, sorry to hear that mate. I do see where you're coming from though. My brief visit to Yale and Stanford last summer showed me a sample of what American Uni life seems like and LSE is very different from that. *shrugs* It is as it is and what you make of it. The Uni does very less to promote socialising, that is sad but true. I know that had I not gone out of my way to meet people and be generally intrusive until I found my 'place' as it were, I would potentially have had the same complaints as generally expressed here.

    C'est la vie I guess.
    c'est la vie indeed. Quel dommage..

    don't get me wrong, LSE is one of the best centers for intellectual life on the planet. the global orientation/fact that student body and faculty come from all over the world, the ground-breaking and state-of-the-art research taking place, the fact that most of my classes are taught by people at the summit of their discipline (the textbooks i read for classes are literally written by my professors, the exams mirror their books in some cases), the fact that there is just so much money, power, and influence permeating the atmosphere here... it is a unique place. gaddafi's son coming here is one tiny reflection of that. it is by no means unique.

    on the other hand, what you have to accept - or at least what i've come to accept - is that the price you pay for 1) truly quality academic culture and 2) a globalized, but highly fissiparous and differentiated student body, is that the social life is not so great at times. that's all. i don't want this message about the lack of social life to dominate the portrayal of LSE.

    i just want the picture to be balanced, so that people don't come here and go, "ohhh noooo i hate everything i wish i'd done something else with my life". i don't think it's an exaggeration to say that about 20 people would be willing to take your place.
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    two things i don't really recognise:

    (Original post by Lou_Ferrigno)
    don't get me wrong, LSE is one of the best centers for intellectual life on the planet.
    we must be doing very different degrees...
    (Original post by Lou_Ferrigno)
    socializing when it takes place at all tends to be formal and superficial.
    i know lse is far from the liveliest uni, but please explain!
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    (Original post by Lou_Ferrigno)
    congragulations, glad you like it. i love studying here as well, but it's the non-studying part of my day that i find unpleasant, and i believe LSE is largely responsible, given that i've met a much higher proportion of 'fun and interesting' people socializing with SOAS and UCL kids. if that hurts your ego i guess that's unfortunate.

    LSE offers one of the most stimulating - possibly, superlative is justified here, THE most stimulating - intellectual environments on the planet. if that's your thing, you will probably not find a better place outside oxbridge or havard/yale, possibly not even there.

    LSE's student body, on the other hand, leaves much to be desired. i'm a transfer student from the states, so i have a basis for comparison. i can tell you unequivocally that compared to where i went before, LSE's social life blows. socializing when it takes place at all tends to be formal and superficial. people tend to stick with their cliques, formed either in freshers' week or through friendships dating back to high school/british equivalent. the place is boring. lest you potential students get the wrong idea that i'm some kind of marginalized nutcase, i hate to inform you but that's the general stereotype - even on campus, that "LSE is boring" - and speaking for myself i've found it to be true.
    this.
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    (Original post by schroeder's dog)
    perhaps dry humor? but lse can't possibly be as bad as people on TSR and the various student satisfaction surveys make it out to be. independent study is a good thing no doubt.
    student experience and teaching might improve under the new management
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    (Original post by Swayum)
    I haven't really read most of this thread, but, as far as teaching woes and such go, it's the same at every university. Seriously. (bar Oxbridge who use a different system and so have different woes)

    People just seem unhappier at LSE because there's less of a let's get pissed/tie someone to a chair on the roof/leave a sleeping friend on a bus to Manchester/**** a fresher culture. It's more of a let's get an investment banking job sort of culture, but there's plenty of fun stuff AT THE SAME TIME. You need to be an open minded person willing to handle intense careers/academic pressure, as well as being able to go out and have fun. And LSE is filled with people who do both, but also contains a minority of people who only manage one of those two things.

    Ditto Vesta on AU culture - if you're into sports, get heavily involved with it.
    I laughed
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    (Original post by Tallon)
    I'm a first year doing the Actuarial Science Bsc course and I think you have summed up all the cons with LSE. But on the bright side, you have summed up all the cons. And that's not to say that LSE is the only university with these problems.

    I might bore you with a few stories of weird **** that has annoyed me at LSE actually.
    My first day, we all head downstairs to shake hands, ask generic questions about what course you're doing, how's life, where you are from, etc a million times over. I was talking to one guy and halfway through the conversation he literally said to me, "I need to find some Asians to talk to". Like, what? Weird.

    A day later I was playing pool with a friend. My friend is talking to some guy, who literally says, word for word to my friend (who's from pakistan) "Yeah, I don't tend to like English people" and he actually points to me as he says it. What?

    After the Actuarial Science induction talk I found myself talking to some girl, and then we head off with her friends to get dinner. And it's all going well, then it suddenly hits me that I have no place here whatsoever because all this group ever talked about, non stop, was who is from where, and how all Indians get on with all philapenies, and what all Chinese people think about it. It was just ridiculous. Like they're obsessed with it, or something. I had nothing to contribute. God, it's just weird. Someone who I was friends with but no longer am, always used to complain to me about "aspirational Indians" or something, as well :\. I look at my friendship groups at LSE now and although I'm usually the only white English guy, my groups are all full of people who grow up in England or who are very English. Not because we're racist at all, because God, we've tried to socialise, but I've come to realise that 's just how LSE and life is, which is awful.

    All the teachers I have are awful and classes are pointless. They go through solutions which are posted up on moodle anyway. I could do that for goodness sake. And all classes are so frustrating because for some reason unknown to me, nobody ever volunteers to answers a general question from the teacher to the class. It’s bull**** because they all know the answers anyway. Why wait literally minutes in completely awkward silence when you have the answer? Just share it so we can move on, for God sake. I used to volunteer answers but I got really sick of it after months, so now I just sit back and let us all die together.

    Lectures are more helpful than classes. LSE was like 3rd overall best university in the Uk according to league tables until they introduced student satisfaction ratings.

    I've only mentioned the bad points though. There are plenty of good points. It's central London so you can live a brilliant life. It not hard to find really good friends to have a great time with. And a degree from LSE does get you places.
    I've applied for this degree as well ^_^ didn't get a reply yet :/
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    (Original post by Lou_Ferrigno)
    congragulations, glad you like it. i love studying here as well, but it's the non-studying part of my day that i find unpleasant, and i believe LSE is largely responsible, given that i've met a much higher proportion of 'fun and interesting' people socializing with SOAS and UCL kids. if that hurts your ego i guess that's unfortunate.

    LSE offers one of the most stimulating - possibly, superlative is justified here, THE most stimulating - intellectual environments on the planet. if that's your thing, you will probably not find a better place outside oxbridge or havard/yale, possibly not even there.

    LSE's student body, on the other hand, leaves much to be desired. i'm a transfer student from the states, so i have a basis for comparison. i can tell you unequivocally that compared to where i went before, LSE's social life blows. socializing when it takes place at all tends to be formal and superficial. people tend to stick with their cliques, formed either in freshers' week or through friendships dating back to high school/british equivalent. the place is boring. lest you potential students get the wrong idea that i'm some kind of marginalized nutcase, i hate to inform you but that's the general stereotype - even on campus, that "LSE is boring" - and speaking for myself i've found it to be true.

    Last paragraph is somewhat true but again it comes down to you. Remember, you're in London. One of the greatest (albeit very expensive) Cities in the world. There is so much to do here even on a very tight budget. The school itself, well of course its boring. Its a place to study, its not really a proper 'campus' its just an assortment of buildings dotted around kingsway and hougton street and most people are 'busy' doing something or other.

    Saying all of that, my post-grad year was a blast: cute girls, incredibly intelligent coursemates and peers, friends all over the world I can go see and in my personal experience several people were always up for going out every night during term time. Wish I was back there.
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    To be perfectly honest, it is really independent but you can ask for help if you bother to!
    the thing with this independent study is that employers know that LSE students are taught to be independent and if you somehow manage to get a first from this then they will hire you. Unlike other unis where you may get one to one tuition, employers are looking for people who can be independent and get the grades. So if you think that you are clever enough and can be independent then LSE will give you that advantage. That is why LSE students are the highest paid!.
 
 
 
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