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Sunday times - highest paid graduates Watch

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    This is exactly what I'd expect. LSE and Imperial are obviously going to be higher since they don't have people studying subjects like History of Art and Sociology dragging the starting salaries down.
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    (Original post by Ghost)
    Welcome to the real world. Not TSR's little fantasy about getting starting wages of £40k.
    This. The only degrees that have average starting salaries that high are Cambridge Economics (38k) and Imperial Computing (37k), which had the highest starting salaries last year when I was applying.
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    (Original post by her)
    It would be even more great if they done one for the course. For example Law, the highest paid students that graduated from a Law degree where from the following universities. That would be great man :rolleyes:
    What do you mean 0_o
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    (Original post by her)
    oh just the position of Oxbridge on the list!
    It's only London unis above that - if you think about it, many students from those unis will stay in London and wages are more there due to higher cost of living.
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    It's not particularly surprising to be honest. It'd be more surprising if salaries were based on achievement or some other idealistic end.

    Not really. For example, Manchester (where I incidentally go) is the biggest campus university in Western Europe, so it makes sense that top employers are going to focus on such a place where the supply [of fairly decent students] is highest -- that doesn't mean that they accept the greatest number of students [in proportion to the total student body] from Manchester, however. In other words, they may only take a few fish from a big pond like Manchester, but many fish from a smaller pond like the LSE: the mere size of Manchester, however, means that it's worth the while of lots of employers pitching up their rods there, if I stick with the metaphor.
    I never said that it should be taken as gospel. Obviously, its clear that Manchester is top of the list because of its sheer size, but it does give a pretty accurate glimpse of which unis are frequently targeted by the top employers.
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    I thought it was more interesting to see who's giving Warwick a run for it's money given the cheery TSR consensus about it's brilliance.
    Yeah, Warwick must be gutted - the only non-London uni apart from Oxbridge and Bath in the top ten, despite the fact that it has a big arts intake. Obviously the fact that it's not at the top of the list means TSR's opinion of its brilliance is wrong.
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    So is it now acceptable to state the fact that arts courses do lead to lesser paid jobs? I mean, we keep hearing how they are as useful to the economy as any science graduate and teach all sorts of skills employers are just craving for, why is this not being reflected in the salary tables?
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    I'm not so surprised about Oxbridge not being at the top, a lot of the students are there for furthering their education for the sake of furthering their education...and because they're all so heavily involved (and equally brilliant) in their fields they turn out to be academics.

    A lot of the students that go to places like LSE, UCL are very career-orientated and are doing the degree with the primary focus of career/salary. LSE is probably the most career-orientated university in the country.

    Although I do remember seeing a list on the times a few months ago showing Cambridge Economists being the highest paid graduates in the country, followed by Imperial's computer scientists.
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    (Original post by megaduck)
    Yeah, Warwick must be gutted - the only non-London uni apart from Oxbridge and Bath in the top ten, despite the fact that it has a big arts intake. Obviously the fact that it's not at the top of the list means TSR's opinion of its brilliance is wrong.
    I'm sure it feels better than I do after having my apostrophe misplacement so cruelly mocked.
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    Oh, get off your high horses and stop thinking that just because they went to a 'bad' university, people can't do well in life. I salute greenwich and LSB for being so high!
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    (Original post by ish90an)
    So is it now acceptable to state the fact that arts courses do lead to lesser paid jobs? I mean, we keep hearing how they are as useful to the economy as any science graduate and teach all sorts of skills employers are just craving for, why is this not being reflected in the salary tables?
    It's probably not being reflected in the league tables because supply far exceeds the demand.
    Let's say out of the ninety odd universities, eighty offer English, and they each have 100 places. That means there is around 8000 English graduates each year. Now most universities offer more places than that, and that's not including graduates from History, Philosophy etc. Most graduates from such subjects apply for the same jobs, e.g journalism so that's why humanities degrees hold less weight these days.

    It's a well known fact most science courses aren't overly competitive, so there will be more competition for the graduates. However, since they're cutting funding for humanities, they'll have to cut places, meaning that the degrees will gradually gain more value.
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    (Original post by i.am.lost)
    This is exactly what I'd expect. LSE and Imperial are obviously going to be higher since they don't have people studying subjects like History of Art and Sociology dragging the starting salaries down.

    LSE does have people studying sociology?
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    (Original post by Colour Me Pretty)
    It's probably not being reflected in the league tables because supply far exceeds the demand.
    Let's say out of the ninety odd universities, eighty offer English, and they each have 100 places. That means there is around 8000 English graduates each year. Now most universities offer more places than that, and that's not including graduates from History, Philosophy etc. Most graduates from such subjects apply for the same jobs, e.g journalism so that's why humanities degrees hold less weight these days.

    It's a well known fact most science courses aren't overly competitive, so there will be more competition for the graduates. However, since they're cutting funding for humanities, they'll have to cut places, meaning that the degrees will gradually gain more value.
    Sorry, science degrees aren't competitive? If by competitive you mean fewer people apply because they either can't hack it or want an easier ride then sure. However, competitiveness can be just as well judged by the entry requirements and how many people last the entire course and don't fall by the wayside. Also, your argument falls for Economics and Law, both humanities subjects with high starting salaries.
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    Graduates from universities such as Greenwich or South Bank have high salaries, because the vast majority of them stays in London after graduation, where salaries are the highest in the UK. Simples.
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    (Original post by ish90an)
    Sorry, science degrees aren't competitive? If by competitive you mean fewer people apply because they either can't hack it or want an easier ride then sure. However, competitiveness can be just as well judged by the entry requirements and how many people last the entire course and don't fall by the wayside. Also, your argument falls for Economics and Law, both humanities subjects with high starting salaries.
    I'd generally say no, science degrees aren't that competitive, exempting medicine. That's why I presume the entry requirements for subjects such as Straight Physics and Biology are usually lower than straight History and English.Based on the amount of applicants and entry requirements, it still indicates that sciences aren't overly competitive.Oh and Law and Economics are classed as social sciences, so my point still stands.
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    (Original post by Billydodger)
    Because Dundee is a smaller Uni but does have a lot of Medical students. Therefore its average is boosted by the higher doctor starting salary than at the other two, where although they have a lot of medics....they have a lot of History of Art etc dragging the average down.
    It actually has a smaller number of medical students than other universities with medical faculties (approx. 160 students per year compared to 200-300 at many others), but yes proportionately it does produce a higher number of graduates into the all of professions e.g. law, medicine, dentistry, accountancy and teaching.
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    (Original post by SPMS)
    Sorry I never saved the law table image.
    What universities are you interested in?
    queen mary
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    (Original post by Colour Me Pretty)
    I'd generally say no, science degrees aren't that competitive, exempting medicine. That's why I presume the entry requirements for subjects such as Straight Physics and Biology are usually lower than straight History and English.Based on the amount of applicants and entry requirements, it still indicates that sciences aren't overly competitive.Oh and Law and Economics are classed as social sciences, so my point still stands.
    Or maybe the entry requirements are lower because:
    a) Fewer people are taking them because they are hard
    b) The subjects they request at high school level are the harder ones (such as Maths or Physics) as opposed to any odd A level.
    Competitiveness isn't to do with blanket entry requirements, its to do with how many people can actually a) enter the course and b) do very well in it. Your argument confuses popularity with competitiveness, a middle-ranking university may have more applicants than MIT, that does not make it more competitive. And law's a humanities subject.
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    (Original post by ish90an)
    Or maybe the entry requirements are lower because:
    a) Fewer people are taking them because they are hard
    b) The subjects they request at high school level are the harder ones (such as Maths or Physics) as opposed to any odd A level.
    Competitiveness isn't to do with blanket entry requirements, its to do with how many people can actually a) enter the course and b) do very well in it. Your argument confuses popularity with competitiveness, a middle-ranking university may have more applicants than MIT, that does not make it more competitive. And law's a humanities subject.
    No.

    You obviously do not understand what the word competitive means. I suggest that you perhaps read a dictionary.
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      My alma mater is at #12. That makes me feel all warm and fuzzy
     
     
     
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