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    Hi!

    Any Norwegians here paying home fees? Please contact me if you do! I really need help
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    (Original post by buttons_89)
    Hi,
    I know this forum isn't really for this but I wanted to ask anyway.

    For an assignment I have at uni I need to interview (on skype) some Norwegians who are into snowsports...so skiing and snowboarding. And also maybe ask about some other things such as Friluftsliv.

    If you think you may be able to help or are interested in knowing more, please message me back.

    Thank you
    You might have some difficulty getting a Norwegian to explain that. It's so ingrained in Norwegian culture that it's hard for people to verbalise (in my experience of speaking to Norwegians about it). I'm only a quarter Norwegian but I do ski (langrenn - not sure what that'd be in English) and have only lived in Norway for about a year in total during my entire life, so take what I say with a pinch of salt: friluftslivet is, superficially, enjoying and taking part in outdoor activities (especially skiing it seems, but also camping, hunting, foraging, hiking, mountaineering, et cetera) but it is also, on a deeper level, connecting with the land (by this I mean specifically Norway; going camping in England, for example, wouldn't really qualify as part of living friluftslivet) and its nature and history - it's very much a part of Norwegian culture and being Norwegian, when I go skiing in Norway people immediately recognise that I'm not native because they generally learn to ski before they even learn to ride a bike (whereas I'm a decent skier, but only learned to ski when I was about 20 - when I've fallen off my skis people ask me in English whether I'm ok and seem a little surprised when I reply in Norwegian), come to think of it I've never seen a Norwegian over the age of about five fall off of their skis. It's sort of a way people express their appreciation of their homeland and identify themselves as intrinsically a part of it, but at the same time it's also responsible for the wave of Norwegian explorers like Heyerdahl, Kagge, Ousland (you can even draw a link as far back as the vikings and their explorations and settlement) going as far afield as the Poles and Polynesia.

    I might be romanticising the concept somewhat as a foreigner. Infact, Lucreria is probably going to say that what I've written is a load of nonsense, haha .
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    (Original post by Luceria)
    Langrenn = Cross country skiing

    You're right about the close relationship with nature. Norwegian cities all exist in a close relationship with nature, and it's a big part of being Norwegian. Norwegian children are encouraged to play outside etc, even if the weather is bad ( No such thing as a bad weather, only bad clothing!). Going on walks etc is viewed as very successful if you don't run into other people, haha. It's kind of the point, to get away from people and be close to nature. Loads of Norwegians have cabins close to ski resorts and so on. As soon as easter comes, many Norwegians travel to their cabins.

    The "Norwegians are born with skis on their feet" saying is a stereotype. I've seen plenty fall, and I've fallen myself. I got cross country skis when I was very young, and I have no problems with cross country skiing. I think most Norwegians would be comfortable with skis. But when it comes to slalåm and skiing down very big hills , you'll find terrified people like myself. I've only tried slalåm once. It's scary and almost impossible to get up if you fall! The one time I tried slålom was on a "school ski day".
    I've often seen 5 year olds zoom past me on skis. Which is a little strange, but not surprising.

    I reckon this is a good link: http://folk.uio.no/geirthe/Nature.html. I'm not very into skiing at all, but good luck buttons_89!
    That's it, had just forgotten.

    Ok, slalåm and alpine, sure, but how many Norwegians do you really see falling off when doing cross country?
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    (Original post by Luceria)
    Haha, few. Because it's so "easy". It's always in hills people fall. Cross country or not. I love those really long yet not very steep hills, like a dream come true! You can ski down them ,but it doesn't go super fast.
    Yeah, I know what you mean. There's one like that in Sognsvann, Oslo which you can just ski down for about twenty minutes - just a gentle, pleasant slope with smooth turns (and I only fell off on it a couple of times :rolleyes: ).
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    (Original post by Einheri)
    Yeah, I can't imagine the rifles people are required to have are actually much use in Svalbard. There was an incident in Japan in the early twentieth century when a single brown bear pretty much decimated an entire village and shrugged off several bullets, Polar Bears are bigger, stronger and faster than them .

    Ah that's a shame, Norwegians are generally very nice people when they get to know you. Also, I was very surprised at the amount of Norwegian girls who have a thing for English accents - wasn't expecting that. Great people, but sadly have a bit of a bad rep for being 'icy' at first (as I said once you get to know Norwegian people they really open up - my roommate in Oslo last year even invited me to his family's house for Jol which was really great and I really appreciated the gesture).

    .
    Apparently the best bet when a bear comes is to frighten it with a flare. You just have to be sure not to actually fire it at the bear, in case it shoots past it and then bangs, sending a startled bear charging straight towards you!

    I did meet a few at the local youth hostel and they seemed quite nice. A little crazy or "enthusiastic" perhaps, but really quite friendly people!

    Did you do a year in Norway? How on earth did you fund that?!?! And how do you get a year in Norway
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    (Original post by JayTeeKay)
    Apparently the best bet when a bear comes is to frighten it with a flare. You just have to be sure not to actually fire it at the bear, in case it shoots past it and then bangs, sending a startled bear charging straight towards you!

    I did meet a few at the local youth hostel and they seemed quite nice. A little crazy or "enthusiastic" perhaps, but really quite friendly people!

    Did you do a year in Norway? How on earth did you fund that?!?! And how do you get a year in Norway
    Even worse - you could have a fiery polar bear charging at you .

    I did a semester in my second year at UiO (through Erasmus), but I've been a few times before on holiday and stayed for a few months on my pseudo-gapyah. Not so well in the funding department, had to 'borrow' a few grand from my parents and ended up moving in with my cousin for the last 6 weeks or so (he stays here all the time during holidays for free and eats everything in the house (not kidding, he adds about £100 a week to the food bill everytime he stays) so I figure it was time to repay the favour, haha).

    (Original post by Luceria)
    Rupert Grint has been confirmed to star in "Comrade".. An anti-war film filmed in Norway. Pretty strange!
    That's weird, but he should fit in nicely in the Norwegian forests - he looks like a troll. A short ginger troll but still . . .

    Edit: Sorry, that wasn't very clear. My home univeristy is The University of Nottingham but I went on an Erasmus exchange.
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    (Original post by Einheri)
    I did a semester in my second year at UiO (through Erasmus), but I've been a few times before on holiday and stayed for a few months on my pseudo-gapyah. Not so well in the funding department, had to 'borrow' a few grand from my parents and ended up moving in with my cousin for the last 6 weeks or so (he stays here all the time during holidays for free and eats everything in the house (not kidding, he adds about £100 a week to the food bill everytime he stays) so I figure it was time to repay the favour, haha).

    Edit: Sorry, that wasn't very clear. My home univeristy is The University of Nottingham but I went on an Erasmus exchange.
    I remember things like chocolate bars being £3.00 and up in Longyearbyen's Co-op, and things like hats and gloves starting around £30.00. I'd hate to imagine what kind of money I would spend if I was to stay there.
    Although, I cannot think of anywhere I'd rather spend time, on a pseudo-gapyah or just on holiday. Except maybe Iceland, which is not really that much cheaper.
    Ah. I don't think Warwick do exchanges If I deliberately sabotage my A levels, I can go to York and spend a year in Germany, but it's still not as good as Norway.
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    (Original post by JayTeeKay)
    I remember things like chocolate bars being £3.00 and up in Longyearbyen's Co-op, and things like hats and gloves starting around £30.00. I'd hate to imagine what kind of money I would spend if I was to stay there.
    Although, I cannot think of anywhere I'd rather spend time, on a pseudo-gapyah or just on holiday. Except maybe Iceland, which is not really that much cheaper.
    Ah. I don't think Warwick do exchanges If I deliberately sabotage my A levels, I can go to York and spend a year in Germany, but it's still not as good as Norway.
    Yup, very expensive. I once bought a Big Mac and it cost me about £14, always buy two ten kroner cheese burgers and put them together. Valuable lesson.

    Shame, maybe you could ask them? Perhaps they simply don't advertise it? At Nottingham I could have gone to Lund, Uppsala, Aarhus, Bergen or Copenhagen if I'd wanted to.
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    (Original post by Einheri)
    Yup, very expensive. I once bought a Big Mac and it cost me about £14, always buy two ten kroner cheese burgers and put them together. Valuable lesson.

    Shame, maybe you could ask them? Perhaps they simply don't advertise it? At Nottingham I could have gone to Lund, Uppsala, Aarhus, Bergen or Copenhagen if I'd wanted to.
    Haha. I'll bear that in mind! Although I doubt I'll be able to afford a trip like that any time soon. There is a society at Warwick called Jailbreak, where you have to get as far away from Warwick as possible in 36 hours without spending any money -I might see if I can hitch a lift to Narvik or something
    I'm guessing you were on some kind of Scandinavian studies or language course if all your options were in Scandinavia? The physics department at York offers years abroad at Heidelberg, Münster, Erlangen-Nürnberg, and some other unis in France, Spain and Italy (didn't look to find out as I don't speak any of those languages).
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    (Original post by Luceria)
    He doesn't look like a troll, haha. He looks perfectly fine. It's being filmed in Skjåk, Oppland.
    Well, you would say that. Maybe you can visit him and he'll take you back to live under his waterfall.

    (Original post by Luceria)
    Haha.. I'm not surprised about McDonald's prices. Norway has the most expensive McDonalds in the world (according to the Big Mac index).

    Chocolate is indeed expensive. Just this costs over 6 pounds, rather silly. lol
    http://www.matvareguiden.no/bilder/8578.gif
    I'd pay £6 right now for a Troika bar. Or a Nero bar. Or some good salt lakris. :coma:
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    (Original post by JayTeeKay)
    Haha. I'll bear that in mind! Although I doubt I'll be able to afford a trip like that any time soon. There is a society at Warwick called Jailbreak, where you have to get as far away from Warwick as possible in 36 hours without spending any money -I might see if I can hitch a lift to Narvik or something
    I'm guessing you were on some kind of Scandinavian studies or language course if all your options were in Scandinavia? The physics department at York offers years abroad at Heidelberg, Münster, Erlangen-Nürnberg, and some other unis in France, Spain and Italy (didn't look to find out as I don't speak any of those languages).
    Narvik is awesome. I know a guy who lives there. However, you really don't want to get stuck in the north of Norway with no money, especially if it's snowing at the time.

    Yup, but if you can find some kind of academic justification for it I'm sure you could arrange it.
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    (Original post by Luceria)
    Silly you, lol.

    A single troika costs 1.60 or something like that. Lovely chocolate, even if I prefer dark. haha. Never heard of Nero.
    Okay, under his bridge then. Nice and cosy, slight damp with occasional sound of hooves, but all-in-all a firm foot on the property ladder.

    Nero bars are liquorice jelly covered in a thin layer of dark chocolate. They cost about ten kroner, most vending machines in Oslo have them. Very nice if you like liquorice and dark chocolate, I prefer milk chocolate generally but it goes together very well with liquorice. It's made by Nidar.

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    (Original post by Luceria)
    Well that sounds lovely.

    Right, Oslo.. I saw the picture of the chocolate, and it looks vaguely familiar. Though I've never really seen them sell it here. Not a big fan of liquorice , and I don't like when they mix liquorice/jelly etc together with chocolate.

    I prefer really dark chocolate. Freia has some really good ones. Dark chocolate and passion fruit etc etc. A little expensive though.

    Oh yes:
    http://www.kraftfoodsnordic.com/kraf...=2692&Mid=2692
    Don't like liqourice? :mad: It's my ultimate vice. I really shouldn't eat so much of it though because apparently it stimulates oestrogen production (although having my very own pair of boobs could be fun, haha).

    That sounds . . . unpleasant. Like someone at Freia was really drunk one night and came up with it for laugh.
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    I'm not Norwegian but I just have to say I love it and the whole of Scandinavia! :ahee:
    Unfortunately I'm teaching myself Swedish, but it's only to then help me with Norwegian after

    I thought I was really cool last weekend however as a Norwegian guy approached me and a friend after the night ended and I thought I'd impress him by saying "Hvordan har du det?" and pronouncing it in a really strong English accent. He didn't seem that impressed :emo:
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    (Original post by Luceria)
    What? It's not unpleasant at all! It tastes really good. Summery, light, luxurious and delicious. They also have dark mint, orange, lemon etc.. Milk chocolate often tastes too cheap, 'childish' and sweet. Though I'll never dislike Freia Melkesjokalde.

    And Kvikk Lunsj is better than Kit Kat!
    Hmmm . . . how much did Freia pay you to say that? :hmmm: I can't say I've tasted better than Freia Melkesjokolade though, Lindt is a close second but is too sweet to have more than about 20g.

    Agreed. Kit Kat (do they actually sell it in Norway?) is too hard and the chocolate isn't creamy enough, Kvikk Lunsj is like biting into a marshmallow/chocolate/wafer hybrid. Also, they have the little puzzle on the inside .
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    (Original post by Milky Milk)
    I'm not Norwegian but I just have to say I love it and the whole of Scandinavia! :ahee:
    Unfortunately I'm teaching myself Swedish, but it's only to then help me with Norwegian after

    I thought I was really cool last weekend however as a Norwegian guy approached me and a friend after the night ended and I thought I'd impress him by saying "Hvordan har du det?" and pronouncing it in a really strong English accent. He didn't seem that impressed :emo:
    Did he answer in Norwegian?
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    (Original post by Einheri)
    Did he answer in Norwegian?
    No, I'm pretty sure he was drunk anyway. I said I was learning Swedish then he went on a very long rant about they were close however (which I already knew) and then he compared Norwegian/Swedish/Danish to English/Scottish/Irish/Welsh which are definately not in the same category

    Apparently bars in Norway are open until 6am? So I was told by him anyway
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    (Original post by Milky Milk)
    No, I'm pretty sure he was drunk anyway. I said I was learning Swedish then he went on a very long rant about they were close however (which I already knew) and then he compared Norwegian/Swedish/Danish to English/Scottish/Irish/Welsh which are definately not in the same category

    Apparently bars in Norway are open until 6am? So I was told by him anyway
    What? English is a West Germanic language, along with German and Dutch. Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Icelandic and Faroese are North Germanic. Both North and West Germanic languages are descended from Common Germanic, so they have the same common ancestor. Welsh is no more related to English than Russian, Greek, or Romanian. I wouldn't expect most Norwegians to be that clueless about language, it's a pretty big thing in Norway.

    I don't remember, I went to a bar only a couple of times and decided my wallet couldn't take it. Students in Norway tend to just drink beer (smuggled from Sweden)at houses parties, at home, at friends houses, in the park or other outside communal areas. It's very dear in pubs 'n' clubs.
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    (Original post by Luceria)
    Well, he was drunk. lol. Though there are idiots everywhere.I've never heard of a bar being open until 6 AM. Who could afford that anyway? Haha. Most close around 3 AM. Smuggled from Sweden? I guess you're talking about people from Oslo.
    It's illegal to drink in a public space

    Alcohol laws are really rather strict here and alcohol is very expensive (which is a good thing). The Wine Monopoly, beer can't be
    sold after 20.00 pm on weekdays, and 18.00 pm on Saturdays. And several days during the easter they don't sell beer at all.. Etc.

    It's almost April .. Not long until 17th May! Wow. Russ 2010 ... Russ 2011 can't compare, I'm sure.
    Yeah, people from Trondheim smuggle it from Jamtland too. I think if you're close-ish to the border it's just cheaper to buy it in bulk from Sweden and risk getting it taken off you if pulled over. Go to Vigelandsparken on a Saturday, everyone has a beer especially students. It's illegal but tolerated unless people get rowdy (at least in Oslo, and I don't mean on the street but in parks, communal outdoor areas, et cetera).

    I wouldn't say it's such a good thing. It feels a little ridiculous being refused alcohol because it's 6pm on a Saturday. I think responsible drinking should be encouraged rather than an 'alcohol-is-bad' attitude. It also feels a little patronising. This was really the only thing I didn't like about Norway, so don't take that as a major insult or anything.

    Eg elskar syttande mai! Last year I ate so much sausage and lompe that I genuinely thought I was going to die.
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    (Original post by Luceria)
    I live in Rogaland, so far away from the border. I know they kind of accept it in some parks in Oslo, but in general it's not allowed. I wouldn't have taken the chance. Lol, no that's not insulting. Though I don't agree. A lot of people have great difficulty when it comes to being responsible. I've seen it with my own eyes. They act like idiots. Norwegians and alcohol don't go well together. I think it's good that it's strict. There is nothing more unattractive than people who drink too much. Most "butikker" close 20.00/21.00 pm anyway.

    17 Mai :awesome: It's brilliant. No other country have anything quite like it, and it's the biggest celebration of the year. I also have a beautiful Hardanger bunad. Anyone who hates bunads must be insane. Men in bunad = :coma:
    I was a Russ last year, which was fun. I don't think there was a "Russetog" in Oslo last year, but the children parade in Oslo is great. I'm going to miss going in the children parade here!

    This is the "Russetog" from my city last year.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tasZJJxCMVA
    You went to see Oslo's barnetog last year too? Small world. It's cute and funny, I don't think there's anything like that in England. There were a lot of people wearing russ clothes, but I didn't see a russetog. I didn't actually know what russ were until I asked someone, and this was a few days after 17. mai.

    Bunads er awesome, I was going to wear a Voss bunad (my grandma is from Voss) but couldn't find one in Oslo. I think women's bunads look better than men's though, men's look slightly silly whereas women's are very nice - it's a huge shame that no-one wears them anymore.
 
 
 
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