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    (Original post by BillLionheart)
    Its not entirely well defined, but personally I would expect most if not all final year marks to be first class, and some of the relevant ones especially to be really high. Typically that makes to overall average above 80% but the profile is probably more important than the mean. I am not, I hasten to add, on the committee that allocates the DTA awards at Manchester so I don't actually know what criteria they use to rank the students. I understand it is based entirely on academic merit (rather than for example the merits of the supervisor or the desirability of having more students in a certain area of mathematics).
    That's hard. Really hard.
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    (Original post by BillLionheart)
    Its not entirely well defined, but personally I would expect most if not all final year marks to be first class, and some of the relevant ones especially to be really high. Typically that makes to overall average above 80% but the profile is probably more important than the mean. I am not, I hasten to add, on the committee that allocates the DTA awards at Manchester so I don't actually know what criteria they use to rank the students. I understand it is based entirely on academic merit (rather than for example the merits of the supervisor or the desirability of having more students in a certain area of mathematics).
    Do you know how universities tend to feel about marks that have been scaled upwards due to extra modules being taken? For example at Warwick we can get our final mark scaled by 10/9 for taking 25% or more over the normal load, which is quite a lot if you're already getting firsts before the scaling...
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    (Original post by .matt)
    Do you know how universities tend to feel about marks that have been scaled upwards due to extra modules being taken? For example at Warwick we can get our final mark scaled by 10/9 for taking 25% or more over the normal load, which is quite a lot if you're already getting firsts before the scaling...
    Well I only know of Warwick using the Seymore formula (I was an undergrad at Warwick). The point is postgrad admissions tutors and potential supervisors will look at your transcript more than your overall mark, and they will look carefully at the reference. Let me say though that there are plenty of people who have got a lower first and gone on to do a PhD and become successful mathematicians. Its just that getting a DTA funded place is really competitive.

    Here are the DTA allocations for interest. http://www.epsrc.ac.uk/about/progs/m...locations.aspx . As you see COWI + Bristol Manchester and Nottingham are the only ones getting over 4% of the total, so relatively we have quite a few scholarships. My point is its still very hard to get them. Even harder at most departments with only a few to give out each year.

    There are other sources of funding, though. At Manchester for example we fund some scholarships from our own funds, and there are also CASE, project grants and doctoral training centres.

    Another way to fund a PhD is to go to a US university where you might be able to fund yourself by teaching assistantships and competitive scholarships. The economics there are different, they need lots of TAs to help teach Math 101 to all comers and that drives postgraduate recruitment and funding to some extent. The USA is a tremendous place to study maths (or "math" as they call it)
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    (Original post by BillLionheart)
    Well I only know of Warwick using the Seymore formula (I was an undergrad at Warwick). The point is postgrad admissions tutors and potential supervisors will look at your transcript more than your overall mark, and they will look carefully at the reference. Let me say though that there are plenty of people who have got a lower first and gone on to do a PhD and become successful mathematicians. Its just that getting a DTA funded place is really competitive.

    Here are the DTA allocations for interest. http://www.epsrc.ac.uk/about/progs/m...locations.aspx . As you see COWI + Bristol Manchester and Nottingham are the only ones getting over 4% of the total, so relatively we have quite a few scholarships. My point is its still very hard to get them. Even harder at most departments with only a few to give out each year.

    There are other sources of funding, though. At Manchester for example we fund some scholarships from our own funds, and there are also CASE, project grants and doctoral training centres.

    Another way to fund a PhD is to go to a US university where you might be able to fund yourself by teaching assistantships and competitive scholarships. The economics there are different, they need lots of TAs to help teach Math 101 to all comers and that drives postgraduate recruitment and funding to some extent. The USA is a tremendous place to study maths (or "math" as they call it)
    Well I guess I have an incentive to actually work hard this year, then! I might as well just aim to get as high a marks as I can in all/relevant modules and then worry about admission/funding closer to the time

    Thanks for that link though - it probably is worth focusing more on applying to the places with more funding available
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    (Original post by BillLionheart)
    Well I only know of Warwick using the Seymore formula (I was an undergrad at Warwick). The point is postgrad admissions tutors and potential supervisors will look at your transcript more than your overall mark, and they will look carefully at the reference. Let me say though that there are plenty of people who have got a lower first and gone on to do a PhD and become successful mathematicians. Its just that getting a DTA funded place is really competitive.

    Here are the DTA allocations for interest. http://www.epsrc.ac.uk/about/progs/m...locations.aspx . As you see COWI + Bristol Manchester and Nottingham are the only ones getting over 4% of the total, so relatively we have quite a few scholarships. My point is its still very hard to get them. Even harder at most departments with only a few to give out each year.

    There are other sources of funding, though. At Manchester for example we fund some scholarships from our own funds, and there are also CASE, project grants and doctoral training centres.

    Another way to fund a PhD is to go to a US university where you might be able to fund yourself by teaching assistantships and competitive scholarships. The economics there are different, they need lots of TAs to help teach Math 101 to all comers and that drives postgraduate recruitment and funding to some extent. The USA is a tremendous place to study maths (or "math" as they call it)
    That was a very useful piece of information, The question now is how do American universities rate British degrees?

    thanks
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    (Original post by pappymajek)
    That was a very useful piece of information, The question now is how do American universities rate British degrees?

    thanks
    Typically they over rate them relative to their own.
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    (Original post by pappymajek)
    That was a very useful piece of information, The question now is how do American universities rate British degrees?

    thanks
    Well according some Americans I spoke to a while back, quite highly in fact.
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    (Original post by anshul95)
    Well according some Americans I spoke to a while back, quite highly in fact.
    Please do well if you go to US so as to maintain our reputation!
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    (Original post by BillLionheart)
    Typically they over rate them relative to their own.
    So how would you rate American maths students in comparison to our own?
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    (Original post by BillLionheart)
    Please do well if you go to US so as to maintain our reputation!
    I heard it is very competitive though.
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    (Original post by alexs2602)
    So how would you rate American maths students in comparison to our own?
    You mean undergraduates I suppose? Most come from school with something equivalent to our AS (unless they do something called AP which is rare and closer to A-level) , so they start behind us. Those who "major" in "math" soon catch up and and at mid ranking US mathematics departments the work they do is comparable to students in good British depts. On the whole they work very hard at their studies, and work hard at evening and weekend jobs to pay for their studies! British students would find it odd that (in some states at least?) the legal drinking age is 21!
 
 
 
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