Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Does Ed Miliband grind your gears like he does mine? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Teveth)
    It's funny. Prior to his victory in the leadership contest, Ed was painted as a radical, an extremist, a far left revolutionary and all the rest of it. He was even dubbed Red Ed. After the public refused to buy all that nonsense and Labour soared ahead in the polls, the media propaganda machine is now attempting to paint him as a lightweight with no policies to speak of. You just could not make this up. And what's worse... people like the OP are buying it!
    To be fairly honest, I find the 'red ed' tag a bit ludicrous - it's pretty impossible to put a tag on what Ed Milliband thinks - seemingly, he thinks whatever's popular for him to think, a la graduate taxes and child benefit for the middle classes.

    Aside from that ridiculous contradiction, there are two points in the OP I would like to address, very briefly.

    1. You cannot talk about Ed being a political point scorer if you're a supporter of either Cameron or Clegg. Cameron's entire time in opposition was spent playing the PR and point scoring game. Ed's just doing what is unfortunately necessary for a modern day politician. He's no worse than anyone else, in that respect. At least during PMQs he hasn't resorted to the bullying tactics adopted by Cameron. He's been nothing but a gentleman.
    You cannot paint me as a supporter of either - Clegg certainly not. I am a member of the Conservative party and I didn't vote Cameron, but I find him to be credible and a majority, if not all of of his policies to be based on sound principles. However, I do disagree with him in some ways.

    Now onto PMQs. Ed Milliband's behaviour during PMQs I find absolutely shocking and un-statesmanlike. He offers zero viable alternatives to policies laid out by the conservative party, he offers zero personal opinion on issues - all he does is tell the electorate 'cuts are bad!'. He goes on to try and get the maximum laughs he can from the Labour benches instead of treating the running of the country and people's lives in a serious manner - pointing fingers, raising his voice, every time it sounds like he's in a schoolboy argument.

    I much prefer Cameron's debating style, and it irritates me far less. Though he does not always give a straight answer to a question (better than blair and brown, though!) that's a criticism of most politicians today. He seems to have much more political sincerity and looks to calmly explain his policies to the chamber. Though he does indulge in some of the ya-boo behaviour in the chamber, his comments usually come as a defence rather than an offence and generally feel much less scripted, wooden, and clichéd.

    This is of course all my own personal opinion, but I'm just explaining why he grinds my gears.

    As to Cameron point-scoring out of office - I disagree. He fought the general election on the promise of cuts and he's delivering those cuts. Gordon Brown fought the election on the promise he wouldn't cut before U-turning. I imagine it was quite tough to run against that message - that we 'didn't have to cut' (a crock of **** if you ask me) but he chose to do it because he found it necessary. Can you find a single government cut Ed has supported? A single one? Where would Ed cut?

    That's right - we have no idea!

    2. He was not elected by a minority of his party. That is a complete lie. The Labour Party is bigger than the MPs who sit in the Commons - I wish people would take the time to understand the Labour Party and what it consists of, and the historical reasons for it, instead of spouting misinformation. Regardless of that, the Labour Party, including the Parliamentary Labour Party, is fully behind Ed as leader. The party has not been this united in a long time.
    I never stated he was elected by a minority - he was swung by a minority. And that minority that he was swung by was the affiliates of the Labour party - all trade union members. Yes, there's no block votes - but it does put him under the thumb of the union's who voted him in, just in the same (or perhaps more) way you would probably argue that the Conservative party is under the thumb of it's big donors. Because who are Labour's biggest donors? And who swung the election for Ed? Yes - it's the same group, the unions and their members.

    Ed's our leader and he will one day be our Prime Minister. Get used to it.
    The mood of the country dictates differently - I don't believe opinion polls can predict accurately a lead at this early stage. If we return to growth and financial stability, I predict labour to be out of power for a decade. If we do not - then it could perhaps be a different story.
    • Offline

      13
      (Original post by Teveth)
      It's funny. Prior to his victory in the leadership contest, Ed was painted as a radical, an extremist, a far left revolutionary and all the rest of it. He was even dubbed Red Ed. After the public refused to buy all that nonsense and Labour soared ahead in the polls, the media propaganda machine is now attempting to paint him as a lightweight with no policies to speak of. You just could not make this up. And what's worse... people like the OP are buying it!

      Aside from that ridiculous contradiction, there are two points in the OP I would like to address, very briefly.

      1. You cannot talk about Ed being a political point scorer if you're a supporter of either Cameron or Clegg. Cameron's entire time in opposition was spent playing the PR and point scoring game. Ed's just doing what is unfortunately necessary for a modern day politician. He's no worse than anyone else, in that respect. At least during PMQs he hasn't resorted to the bullying tactics adopted by Cameron. He's been nothing but a gentleman.

      2. He was not elected by a minority of his party. That is a complete lie. The Labour Party is bigger than the MPs who sit in the Commons - I wish people would take the time to understand the Labour Party and what it consists of, and the historical reasons for it, instead of spouting misinformation. Regardless of that, the Labour Party, including the Parliamentary Labour Party, is fully behind Ed as leader. The party has not been this united in a long time.

      Ed's our leader and he will one day be our Prime Minister. Get used to it.
      The day Ed becomes Prime Minister, we know that Britain is really in the ****. :facepalm2:
      Offline

      12
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by AskMeAnything)
      Now onto PMQs. Ed Milliband's behaviour during PMQs I find absolutely shocking and un-statesmanlike. He offers zero viable alternatives to policies laid out by the conservative party, he offers zero personal opinion on issues - all he does is tell the electorate 'cuts are bad!'. He goes on to try and get the maximum laughs he can from the Labour benches instead of treating the running of the country and people's lives in a serious manner - pointing fingers, raising his voice, every time it sounds like he's in a schoolboy argument.

      I much prefer Cameron's debating style, and it irritates me far less. Though he does not always give a straight answer to a question (better than blair and brown, though!) that's a criticism of most politicians today. He seems to have much more political sincerity and looks to calmly explain his policies to the chamber. Though he does indulge in some of the ya-boo behaviour in the chamber, his comments usually come as a defence rather than an offence and generally feel much less scripted, wooden, and clichéd.
      I think your overly generous comments about Cameron come mainly from subjective bias and I think if you expect anything different from any opposition leader then you're watching the wrong programme. PMQs is spectacle. That is it. Nothing substantive takes place during it and nothing substantive is meant to take place during it. The fact we are discussing debating styles here pretty much sums it up. PMQs is one of the more obvious examples of bread-and-circuses that make up our distraction of a democracy.
      Offline

      1
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by Teveth)
      It's funny. Prior to his victory in the leadership contest, Ed was painted as a radical, an extremist, a far left revolutionary and all the rest of it. He was even dubbed Red Ed. After the public refused to buy all that nonsense and Labour soared ahead in the polls, the media propaganda machine is now attempting to paint him as a lightweight with no policies to speak of. You just could not make this up. And what's worse... people like the OP are buying it!

      Aside from that ridiculous contradiction, there are two points in the OP I would like to address, very briefly.

      1. You cannot talk about Ed being a political point scorer if you're a supporter of either Cameron or Clegg. Cameron's entire time in opposition was spent playing the PR and point scoring game. Ed's just doing what is unfortunately necessary for a modern day politician. He's no worse than anyone else, in that respect. At least during PMQs he hasn't resorted to the bullying tactics adopted by Cameron. He's been nothing but a gentleman.

      2. He was not elected by a minority of his party. That is a complete lie. The Labour Party is bigger than the MPs who sit in the Commons - I wish people would take the time to understand the Labour Party and what it consists of, and the historical reasons for it, instead of spouting misinformation. Regardless of that, the Labour Party, including the Parliamentary Labour Party, is fully behind Ed as leader. The party has not been this united in a long time.

      Ed's our leader and he will one day be our Prime Minister. Get used to it.
      The idea of little Eddie being PM makes me laugh. He IS a lightweight, but so is majority of British politicians. Indeed, the only politicians I would have as the PM would be Vince Cable and Gordon Brown.
      • Thread Starter
      Offline

      2
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by littleshambles)
      I think your overly generous comments about Cameron come mainly from subjective bias and I think if you expect anything different from any opposition leader then you're watching the wrong programme. PMQs is spectacle. That is it. Nothing substantive takes place during it and nothing substantive is meant to take place during it. The fact we are discussing debating styles here pretty much sums it up. PMQs is one of the more obvious examples of bread-and-circuses that make up our distraction of a democracy.
      I don't believe it's subjective bias - it's analytical on my part. I found Gordon Brown to be better in PMQs on some occasions than Cameron, but I just find Ed appalling. Just seeing his face makes me want to punch it in, his smarmy smile etc. It's not just about PMQs - everything he says just causes me great anger. His new years day message makes me want to hurl.

      This is his face as he delivers it;



      And that's from the guardian - so it's obviously the best image they could capture of him. He's trying to display the cuts as 'unnecessary', when it's clear to any rational person that we're deeply in debt and the cuts are keeping us afloat. Because not cutting - the alternative - is going so well for America's economy. 11 Trillion of debt now, and every day another story of their economic woes.
      Offline

      0
      ReputationRep:
      i think what annoys me about ed milliband's labour is that they score petty political points against a government which is trying (not too effectively tbf) to get us out of the 996 billion pound deficit which labour sat on for 14 years. im no raving cameron fan - but at least the government is making cuts, which labour were not going to do.
      Offline

      0
      ReputationRep:
      the whole consevative cabinet grinds my gear!
      Offline

      13
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by AskMeAnything)
      Not only does he look like Mr Potato Head, his vacuous rhetoric and criticism without offering ANY viable policies or alternatives just appals me. His performances in the chamber including PMQ's are unprofessional and Ya-boo politics in every instance. He never has anything real to say and he's obsessed with scoring tiny political points with the electorate, as voiced by his fake electioneering populism over graduate taxes. He wasn't even elected by a majority of his party; the unions that bankroll him and his party swung the vote towards him.

      Does anyone else have a deep hate for Red Ed?
      Are you anti-semitic?
      Offline

      0
      ReputationRep:
      As an old Labourite i would never EVER vote labour again. I like it when labour stood for everyone and had a certain fairness about them, yes they messed a lot of things up but still I have far more rights (for example: I’m in a civil partnership; I can force my university to help with my dyslexia and my work). This middle class politics show the Ed Miliband and his idiot followers is bring is just utterly ****. I have not agreed with one thing the man has said because he hasn't said anything at all!

      I think this country needs some fresh blood in politics, and people of a more creative standard then miliband/clegg/Cameron. Are all the same to me, they all agree on around 95% of policy’s and none of them really want to shake things up. Diane Abbott was the only one that really would have changed things and she would have nailed into the coalition! But she wouldn't get voted in because she’s too edgy and doesn't stand for the middle class views that the party is these days.

      All i can say is **** it, next election I’m voting greens... ye there middle class and snobby... but at least they'll change the mess!
      Offline

      0
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by im so academic)
      The day Ed becomes Prime Minister, we know that Britain is really in the ****. :facepalm2:
      When that day comes I am moving to Zimbabwe. At least there I know for sure where the leader stands. And the economy will probably be in better shape in the long-term.
      • Thread Starter
      Offline

      2
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by Martyn*)
      Are you anti-semitic?
      I find it rather insulting that you would even suggest that.

      No I am not.
      Offline

      0
      ReputationRep:
      He's like Boris Johnson without the charm and humour.
      Offline

      2
      ReputationRep:
      My problem with him is he seems to be constantly opposing everything for the sake of opposition. He has agreed with absolutely nothing the Coalition has implemented despite the fact his own party probably would have done exactly the same in many areas. I find his opposition on some issues such as cutting Child Benefits for the middle classes and above absolutely ridiculous.

      And in regards to him being PM. The only way I can see him being PM at this point is either at the head of a minority or coalition government himself. I cannot see any party getting a majority at the moment were a election to take place tomorrow. But we still have just over four years til that day so anything could happen.
      Offline

      14
      ReputationRep:
      I can't stand Ed's voice
      Offline

      13
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by AskMeAnything)
      I find it rather insulting that you would even suggest that.

      No I am not.
      At least now no-one would suspect it.
      • Thread Starter
      Offline

      2
      ReputationRep:
      (Original post by Martyn*)
      At least now no-one would suspect it.
      Name one quality of Ed that I mentioned that would draw you to believe I may be anti-semitic? Nobody else was suspecting that, clearly.
      Offline

      18
      ReputationRep:
      Apparently he isn't going to gloat over winning what was a Labour seat.... :rolleyes:
     
     
     
  1. See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  2. Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
    Useful resources

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  3. See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  4. The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.