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    (Original post by wherethebeaverlive)
    Oh I'm sorry! really really sorry for not knowing such an obvious thing!! but gotta love it when a person who's just a kid themselves acts like they know the whole world like the back of their hand. If I were you I would drop the attitude mister. Doesn't matter how great you think you are, it won't get you anywhere.
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    (Original post by Tha_Black_Shinobi)
    Oh how I wish that I could rep you... :teehee:
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    (Original post by Iorek)
    I work for an investment bank now. Generally speaking most of them have very similar requirements as to who can work there and who doesn't.

    Like most prestigious professional careers, it's still largely a "same school tie" club when it comes to hiring anyone. Just so you know, resume screenings are done by software these days not an actual person who reads resumes one by one.

    I started out with a US investment bank after my first degree in international finance from a US university.

    I did a 2nd degree in law from Aberystwyth University because after 8 years in IB I was getting a bit fed up with it. Thought it would be cool to be a lawyer But it turned out after graduating I couldn't foresee myself liking this either so I went back to....................... you guessed it an IB Though not the same one I was with before.

    Starting out at an IB as a graduate, I will be frank with you...... contrary to what everyone likes to tell themselves, what university you come from matters absolutely. The subject you studied at university, this one depends on the bank, some IBs will take in almost any discipline for as long as the university is on their "preferred" list. That list will almost always be the Top 10 in the country. Therefore even if you had a degree in some weird mickey mouse study but it came from Oxford and you had a 2.1, you will be invited for an interview at the bank.

    However some banks are quite strict with what their graduate trainees come in with, usually even if it says "any discipline" it will still invariably favour those who have taken business or financial related courses, economics, mathematics and most will have law as their favoured list as well.

    When it comes to hiring a law graduate, there is a certain "magic" formula, if it is Ox/Cam then a 2.1 or above is fine, though if the hiring manager is a Ox/Cam graduate himself, and he had gone back to his alma matter he may consider to interview someone who has a high 2:2, not to be sexist.... usually those who would stand a chance on this will almost always be a pretty female who can attract the attention of that manager due to her outstanding communication skills. Then it is the next top 10 universities, these the cut-off point would normally be a high 2:1 and a strong interest in financial services, you can prove this by having done internships at financial institutions, vac schemes with firms that specializes in banking work (good references are essential) and usually you can make a convincing case when you could show a transcript that displays courses which are commercial or financial by nature...... doesn't even have to be a law module..... could be a course from the business school for example.

    As for positions you can do, it is extremely rare that what you studied in university will determine what role or position you will have at a bank. But compliance is a common one, FO work is common but you could also be in the legal department. Nothing can be 100% certain where you would end up in, some banks will let you choose where you want to be and train you up for it..... some will see stream you in based upon what you already have.

    As a rule you should take it that your degree only earns you an interview........... and probably only for your 1st job after qualification
    Where would Durham rank on this list? What do you think about an LLB from Durham @ US IB? Is it possible? Even worth a shot?
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    (Original post by adam0311)
    Where would Durham rank on this list? What do you think about an LLB from Durham @ US IB? Is it possible? Even worth a shot?
    What is it with everyone wanting to go to USA? You're the 5th person to ask me a similar question. Isn't UK a wonderful place to be?

    Anyway to answer your question........ I won't say your chance is zero, but the odds will be against you.

    Nothing wrong with Durham as a whole, particularly for law, however American companies that are operating in the US as a whole tend to have a dim view on qualifications that isn't from an institution within the USA. Law in USA is different from that in the UK, therefore it will just be another general degree from an unknown university. I should add that Americans as a whole are quite ignorant when it comes to what is a good university abroad, considering that in USA itself they have almost 4000 universities.

    Therefore if you are after a job in the US, your chances of a graduate job there is pretty slim even with a 1st. It would be easier if you started working with an American IB that operates in the UK and ask for a transfer after a year or 2 which is very common and significantly easier. It will be easier if you could also show an MBA

    As for improving your chances for a graduate job in a US IB, your chances would be better if you've had a student exchange in USA, done internships in US especially if it is with an IB.

    The other issue is you will need to qualify for a work permit, this isn't an easy task at this moment in time. However if you are a UK citizen you could try the BUNAC scheme which would allow you a chance to get your foot in the door at least.

    Hope this answers your questions.
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    (Original post by Iorek)
    What is it with everyone wanting to go to USA? You're the 5th person to ask me a similar question. Isn't UK a wonderful place to be?

    Anyway to answer your question........ I won't say your chance is zero, but the odds will be against you.

    Nothing wrong with Durham as a whole, particularly for law, however American companies that are operating in the US as a whole tend to have a dim view on qualifications that isn't from an institution within the USA. Law in USA is different from that in the UK, therefore it will just be another general degree from an unknown university. I should add that Americans as a whole are quite ignorant when it comes to what is a good university abroad, considering that in USA itself they have almost 4000 universities.

    Therefore if you are after a job in the US, your chances of a graduate job there is pretty slim even with a 1st. It would be easier if you started working with an American IB that operates in the UK and ask for a transfer after a year or 2 which is very common and significantly easier. It will be easier if you could also show an MBA

    As for improving your chances for a graduate job in a US IB, your chances would be better if you've had a student exchange in USA, done internships in US especially if it is with an IB.

    The other issue is you will need to qualify for a work permit, this isn't an easy task at this moment in time. However if you are a UK citizen you could try the BUNAC scheme which would allow you a chance to get your foot in the door at least.

    Hope this answers your questions.
    Thanks for the informative posts!

    Would it have to be an american IB? Couldn't you ask for a transfer at any bank that operates in both the UK and US?
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    (Original post by Iorek)
    What is it with everyone wanting to go to USA? You're the 5th person to ask me a similar question. Isn't UK a wonderful place to be?

    Anyway to answer your question........ I won't say your chance is zero, but the odds will be against you.

    Nothing wrong with Durham as a whole, particularly for law, however American companies that are operating in the US as a whole tend to have a dim view on qualifications that isn't from an institution within the USA. Law in USA is different from that in the UK, therefore it will just be another general degree from an unknown university. I should add that Americans as a whole are quite ignorant when it comes to what is a good university abroad, considering that in USA itself they have almost 4000 universities.

    Therefore if you are after a job in the US, your chances of a graduate job there is pretty slim even with a 1st. It would be easier if you started working with an American IB that operates in the UK and ask for a transfer after a year or 2 which is very common and significantly easier. It will be easier if you could also show an MBA

    As for improving your chances for a graduate job in a US IB, your chances would be better if you've had a student exchange in USA, done internships in US especially if it is with an IB.

    The other issue is you will need to qualify for a work permit, this isn't an easy task at this moment in time. However if you are a UK citizen you could try the BUNAC scheme which would allow you a chance to get your foot in the door at least.

    Hope this answers your questions.
    Thanks for the input. I'm American. Was just curious of options in case I can't secure anything in the UK. But it seems like it isn't even worth the effort to apply for IB in the US.
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    (Original post by i_hate_teeth)

    Would it have to be an american IB?
    Not essential, but significantly easier. When you're working within an American bank, it'll be significantly easier as there will be people from the American HQ that would visit or you may have an American manager.. if you're good you'll be noticed and you may be offered a position in the HQ. If you're serious about it, then each time there are such visitors from USA, you should take every opportunity to network with them.

    (Original post by i_hate_teeth)
    Couldn't you ask for a transfer at any bank that operates in both the UK and US?
    That will depend on the integration between the US and UK operations. The other thing will be whether or not the operations in UK is a significant regional centre or just a small operations centre. If it is the latter then your chances to go to US will be very slim... but as a regional centre then yes it might be possible but these days you are more likely to be asked to go to Shanghai or Hong Kong instead of USA.
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    (Original post by Iorek)
    Not essential, but significantly easier. When you're working within an American bank, it'll be significantly easier as there will be people from the American HQ that would visit or you may have an American manager.. if you're good you'll be noticed and you may be offered a position in the HQ. If you're serious about it, then each time there are such visitors from USA, you should take every opportunity to network with them.



    That will depend on the integration between the US and UK operations. The other thing will be whether or not the operations in UK is a significant regional centre or just a small operations centre. If it is the latter then your chances to go to US will be very slim... but as a regional centre then yes it might be possible but these days you are more likely to be asked to go to Shanghai or Hong Kong instead of USA.
    Ok, that makes sense.

    How do you know so much about this, are you in the business? If so where do you work and what do you do?
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    (Original post by i_hate_teeth)
    Ok, that makes sense.

    How do you know so much about this, are you in the business? If so where do you work and what do you do?
    I am in the industry. I work for a certain Swiss IB I am just one of those risk management analyst. Nothing important
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    (Original post by Iorek)
    I am in the industry. I work for a certain Swiss IB I am just one of those risk management analyst. Nothing important
    Since you've been particularly helpful, I might as well ask you what exactly working in compliance entails?
 
 
 
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