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    (Original post by clarehistory101)
    Also, does anyone else find it weird that an irate economics graduate on the brink of middle age is posting in a teenage forum? Has your subscription to the Daily Mail (reassurance you're not the only one who's a total ass) run out?
    What's wrong with the Daily Mail?
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    (Original post by Bubblyjubbly)
    1) It isn't just a teenage forum, there are a number of threads for postgraduates on here.

    2) There are a number of people in their 30s on this site.

    3) Getting personal about my age and associating me with the hard right because you can't handle the fact that I ridicule those on the extreme left isn't going to make your point your any more convincing.

    4) I know 'studying' PPS/SPS has made you the butt of many jokes, but you don't have to make it that obvious.

    5) I have made my reasons for contributing to Oxbridge-only threads anywhere on the internet quite clear, if you have a problem with that, it is for you to deal with in your own time.

    I know you lefty sociopaths love to claim to be the champions of the poor and the needy, but it's amazing just how quickly you resort to abuse when the veneer gets scratched.
    Where did this come from?! Making a comment about the Daily Mail doesn't require a Marxist political allegiance...
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    (Original post by cheese-lemming)
    I'd love to do Philosophy and I'm good with numbers so I guess PPE would be an obvious choice from the two, but I'm really interested in Sociology, and if the Psychology part wasn't scientific I'd love to study that too...
    Well I'm a 3rd year PPEist (PM me if you want) and you can do 1 or 2 sociology modules if you want (instead of politics modules).

    You do 8 modules in your final 2 years: you could do 5 politics/sociology modules and 3 philosophy/economics...and as one of your philosophy modules you can pick "political philosophy" ergo end up with a v v politicsy PPE degree.

    To be honest though: PPS and PPE are very different degrees so I say you just research them more and figure out the one you'd enjoy the most!
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    (Original post by Bubblyjubbly)
    Nothing, it's certainly FAR better than the garbage Guardian.
    Calling the Guardian garbage. Oh that's brilliant.

    The Daily Mail is a joke of a paper that isn't even taken seriously.
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    (Original post by Cesar Lecat)
    Calling the Guardian garbage. Oh that's brilliant.

    The Daily Mail is a joke of a paper that isn't even taken seriously.
    Not taken seriously...? Wow, big statement.

    Daily Mail circulation: 2,100,855

    The Guardian circulation: 283,063

    ..... which means just over 7 times as many people read the Daily Mail as The Guardian. :rolleyes:

    Now, if you knew anything about politics, you might know that the editor of the Daily Mail is pretty much the most powerful journalist in politics. In fact, despite their arguably very opposed ideologies, Gordon Brown desperately tried to keep up a friendship with Paul Dacre (Daily Mail Editor), above all others, because he realised just how much damage Dacre could do to him if Brown wasn't careful.

    Obviously some people take the Daily Mail seriously. Wait, no, sorry, Gordon Brown doesn't count as a human.

    My mistake. You're right.



    Dumbass.
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    (Original post by Dizzee1)
    Not taken seriously...? Wow, big statement.

    Daily Mail circulation: 2,100,855

    The Guardian circulation: 283,063

    ..... which means just over 7 times as many people read the Daily Mail as The Guardian. :rolleyes:

    Now, if you knew anything about politics, you might know that the editor of the Daily Mail is pretty much the most powerful journalist in politics. In fact, despite their arguably very opposed ideologies, Gordon Brown desperately tried to keep up a friendship with Paul Dacre (Daily Mail Editor), above all others, because he realised just how much damage Dacre could do to him if Brown wasn't careful.

    Obviously some people take the Daily Mail seriously. Wait, no, sorry, Gordon Brown doesn't count as a human.

    My mistake. You're right.



    Dumbass.
    Calling me an idiot? Oh the irony

    The Sun is the biggest selling Newspaper, doesn't mean its taken seriously. People mock the Daily Mail. If you watch HIGNFY and QI, the likes of Stephen Fry, Paul Merton and Ian Hislop have mocked. It's has almost become a parody of itself.

    Whenever a DailyMail article is posted on here or forums such as Digital Spy Forum (politics section), peoples reaction are "Oh, it's the Daily Mail :rolleyes:" I mean, it even has nickname. The Daily Fail

    The majority of its readers are sad, pathetic middle class women who are in their 40s or 50s and have nothing better to do.

    If you want, I could create a poll in the General section, and I would, I bet you the majority of the people would agree.

    The fact is, the Daily Mail is a hypocritical newspaper.

    Oh and have a look in here...

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1480965

    That's just a taster.
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    (Original post by Cesar Lecat)
    Calling me an idiot? Oh the irony

    The Sun is the biggest selling Newspaper, doesn't mean its taken seriously. People mock the Daily Mail. If you watch HIGNFY and QI, the likes of Stephen Fry, Paul Merton and Ian Hislop have mocked. It's has almost become a parody of itself.

    Whenever a DailyMail article is posted on here or forums such as Digital Spy Forum (politics section), peoples reaction are "Oh, it's the Daily Mail :rolleyes:" I mean, it even has nickname. The Daily Fail

    The majority of its readers are sad, pathetic middle class women who are in their 40s or 50s and have nothing better to do.

    If you want, I could create a poll in the General section, and I would, I bet you the majority of the people would agree.

    The fact is, the Daily Mail is a hypocritical newspaper.

    Oh and have a look in here...

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1480965

    That's just a taster.
    If you use that logic, the fact that people mock it, then you can say the Prime Minister is not taken seriously. Nor is the President of the United States. Nor is Al Qaeda, for that matter.

    People often mock things that are powerful and take a big role in the general picture of things. This is why such prominent things as major politicians, world organisations etc etc are so mocked. Have I Got News For You feeds off these types of things because people like to laugh at people who they may conceive as superior to them. People like to think that they could do a better job at running the country, neglecting the fact that they themselves have achieved very little in life. This is why you're more likely to hear ''David Cameron is a ****'' than ''Peter Sutcliffe is a ****''. Everyone knows David Cameron is an infinitely nicer person, but a lot of people are jealous of the power he holds and thus enjoy knocking him.

    Furthermore, the majority of the people on this site are extremely liberal, unrealistic and naive individuals who see it as fashionable to knock the Daily Mail. It's just the thing to do. Just like it is fashionable to defend all immigrants. We, as students, just have this annoying trait where we think we're better, and could do a better job, than the people running the country. :rolleyes:

    Finally, the Daily Mail is not the only paper with a disparaging nickname. How about ''The Grauniad'' and ''The 'Torygraph''???

    No doubt you're also one of those people who will use every opportunity possible to scream ''THAT'S RACIST!''
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    I sense a troll...
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    (Original post by cool-kid)
    You could do history and politics? You sound more suited to PPE or history and politics with your subjects if Im honest.
    Bit late for subject suggestions. I'm graduating in 6 months.
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    (Original post by sammyrj)
    Bit late for subject suggestions. I'm graduating in 6 months.
    Sorry I aimed that at the OP not you
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    (Original post by Bubblyjubbly)
    (.....)
    I'm curious to know your opinion about the different Faculties or Departments that make up PPS. Do you just or mostly take issue with Sociology, or also the others? For instance, what is your personal opinion of the Department(s) of Psychology, and the Faculty of Education of the University of Cambridge?
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    (Original post by Dizzee1)
    If you use that logic, the fact that people mock it, then you can say the Prime Minister is not taken seriously. Nor is the President of the United States. Nor is Al Qaeda, for that matter.

    People often mock things that are powerful and take a big role in the general picture of things. This is why such prominent things as major politicians, world organisations etc etc are so mocked. Have I Got News For You feeds off these types of things because people like to laugh at people who they may conceive as superior to them. People like to think that they could do a better job at running the country, neglecting the fact that they themselves have achieved very little in life. This is why you're more likely to hear ''David Cameron is a ****'' than ''Peter Sutcliffe is a ****''. Everyone knows David Cameron is an infinitely nicer person, but a lot of people are jealous of the power he holds and thus enjoy knocking him.

    Furthermore, the majority of the people on this site are extremely liberal, unrealistic and naive individuals who see it as fashionable to knock the Daily Mail. It's just the thing to do. Just like it is fashionable to defend all immigrants. We, as students, just have this annoying trait where we think we're better, and could do a better job, than the people running the country. :rolleyes:

    Finally, the Daily Mail is not the only paper with a disparaging nickname. How about ''The Grauniad'' and ''The 'Torygraph''???

    No doubt you're also one of those people who will use every opportunity possible to scream ''THAT'S RACIST!''
    Have a pop into this thread - http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...atched_threads
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    (Original post by Bubblyjubbly)
    2) There are a number of people in their 30s on this site.
    An incredibly small number. You're on the very edge of the bell curve.
    (Original post by Junaid16)
    PPE for guys.
    PPS for girls.
    Some will break this trend.
    What gave you that idea? :confused: PPS is very evenly split between males and females.
    (Original post by cheese-lemming)
    reckon it's easier to get into pps then?
    PPS is one of the most competitive Cambridge degree courses to get into at the moment. http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1497884 Its 6 applicants to one place, which is beaten only by Architecture (ten to one), Economics (7 to one) and matched only by medicine (6 to one) But try not to think about that. Whichever degree you apply to, its going to be highly down to luck.
    (Original post by matenhieu)
    Edit: Funnily enough, a very similar percentage of English, biology, history, law and sociology graduates go into retail, catering, waiting and bar staff jobs ('McDonald's jobs') according to the HESCU stats. So much for law graduates being prepared to take 'only the best' jobs. As you will no doubt point out there are of course problems with this. The study isn't longitudinal and so these stats don't tell us what jobs these graduates were in after another 6 months and another 6 months etc. but it is the best we have until we have another study.
    I didn't know that about Sociology But I've never looked into employment stats.
    (Original post by jjarvis)
    Craggy, I have to take issue with one of your points. You claimed your essays were required to be about 2500-3500 words, which was three times as long as law essays. Our essays are typically in the 1700-2500 word range, so they're not really that much shorter. Admittedly, problem answers occasionally are, and anything handwritten in an hour (as some of our supervision essays are required to be) will be shorter. Still, our essays aren't particularly shorter than yours. I realise this isn't a big pissing contest--Cambridge courses in general are tough--but my experience of the law course seems rather different from that of your friends/acquaintances.
    Oh sorry! The West Wing told me that essays tended to be about 1500 words. But I know this sort of thing varies by college.
    (Original post by Bubblyjubbly)
    1) Those who switch to SPS for the final year (e.g. medics), and who effectively do the Part II in one year, aren't restricted by their choice of papers. The paper I sat appeared to include a majority of SPSians and you have no idea just how far away you are from the rest of the Cambridge pack when it comes to the technical demands of your subject.
    Your papers have a huge choice, the questions are almost the same every year, the reading lists consist of (joke) low-grade references and the essays that I saw, including from those who supposedly gained firsts (I can't see how you can get anything less), were essentially childish stories written by the exceptionally naive and exhibited nowhere near the quality and depth of those in other arts subjects. You don't need any prior training in Sociology/Politics and your claim is just a facile attempt to cover up just what kind of low-grade intellect does this pitiful subject and your diatribe illustrates this - you make a series of dubious assumptions about who would do what kind of paper and then insult your own peers in the process, failing to note that the percentages gaining the various classes do not vary a great deal between SPS papers. I took 8 supervisions and that was 8 more than I needed - the SPS students were asking questions for which the answers should have been obvious in kindergarten.
    You're right I don't really know the differences between the content of my degree and others, primarily because I've only done one degree. Like I said though, myself and my friends and peers don't really spend all day talking about our degree courses and how we score one up on eachother in terms of difficulty. Nobody cares!
    (Original post by bubbly)
    2) You can lie about your workload, and you are lying to the nth degree, not only about the number of essays in comparison to other subjects, the amount of effort you had to put in etc...but what you fail to mention are the technical demands of the subject, which many would put in the bargain basement category.
    Actually I'm not lying :rolleyes:
    Your opinion just shows how out of touch you are with Cambridge today. PPS isn't the only degree course that has changed quite a bit over time. You shouldn't assume that everything is the same now as it was when you were a student.

    I know how many essays friends in other subjects have, and I know what length they are. My boyfriend did Philosophy. He had one essay a week. All the Historians in my college had one essay a week, always due on the same day at the same time. I had two or three a week of equal length and sometimes longer. One particularly bad week in Lent earlier this year I had four essays in a week. I had 5 hours of sleep each night of that week and only took breaks for meals and to swap books at the library, spending 100% of the rest of that week busy reading or writing.
    In first year I did at least one all nighter a week in order to keep on top of my work.
    Its true that I was much more diligent than I needed to be and didn't take shortcuts that other people did, but that's the same as it is for other Arts degrees. Different people find them a different amount of work depending on what they want to get out of it and how well they want to do their essays.
    I am not a liar and there are countless people on this website who could vouch for the amount of work I did on my degree if you're in any doubt.

    (Original post by Bubbly)
    3) You then exhibit the classic hallmark of the intellectual lightweight - the discrimination/prejudice card. You make a childish claim, like most of your ilk, and then assume that I am the same age as you - I finished my Cambridge degree in the 90s, have a Phd, and have worked for a number leading employers in London. You then make a series of laughably naive assumptions about my 'corporate agenda' (and that of others) in the process, throwing around typically wet notions of "value" systems without any evidence to back up your claims - I've noticed that sociologists do suffer from the need to make up the opinions of others or invent theories without any basis, thinking that they have provided some kind of insight into a particular topic that nobody else has ever thought of - it's usually nothing insightful at all. Let me guess, you are attending the University of Life, you don't care what happens around you because you think that smoking a joint, dressing like a hippie, going on about the poor in society and spouting your facile nonsense might actually change things ? Tell me, why did you go to Cambridge if you didn't want to be a conformist with a decent job ?
    I'm really sorry but am I supposed to be impressed by the fact that you're old, have a PhD and are an employer? :lolwut: You just seem really bitter and twisted. You seem to care far far more about the difference between different degree courses than the people who are doing these degrees themselves. Also what's all this stuff about 'leading London employers'? I think you missed my previous post where I said that I didn't care.

    So shoot me but the reason I went to Cambridge was:
    a) because I thought there would be an academic atmosphere and other geeks like me who liked learning and enjoyed discussing things intellectually
    b) because I liked the idea of one to one supervisions because I learn very well by discussing things as I formulate them
    c) Because I liked the old buildings and the idea that I could have a lifestyle a little like other people had done for centuries before me.

    Career prospects didn't enter my brain at all. I'm sure you'll think I'm lying, but I'm not.

    I don't dress like a hippy. I have never smoked. I had next to no social life on my undergraduate degree, and I care quite alot about the world around me which is why I enjoyed my degree :lolwut: (I chose it because I was interested in understanding more about society)

    As to the point about value systems, its not particularly controversial to observe that a large number of people trying to get into finance and law are people who want to be rich and successful. This has got nothing to do with postmodern theory or anything else connected to SPS. Its just straightforward observation and its a fairly neutral point, that most people agree with.
    I don't actually care about being rich and successful. Unless by 'success' one means finding a livelihood that I enjoy and find fulfilling, and having time to spend with people I love. Again several people would be to hand on here to point out that I'm not in the least bit 'conformist'.
    You've just had the misfortune of trying to slap a stereotype onto a very unusual person.

    4) You then go on about original/creative clothes, most would regard it as late-onset puberty - just what point are you trying to prove by standing out in a crowd, are you attention seeking ? Since when did a gender balance equate to entry on merit ? You should know that there are three times as many men as women with an IQ above 130 (the Oxbridge top 2%) - I bet that would get me a third in the mother of all non-subjects, Gender. Since when did the proportion of ethnic minorities/international students imply anything about the quality of the course or the intelligence of those doing it ? Since when is a "social" environment of any consequence to anyone except a sociologist who has too much time on his/her hands and who does nothing else but spend their life socialising (banging townies) at 5th Avenue ? I daresay you don't ask how many are from disadvantaged backgrounds or on special access schemes as the answer is obvious - most of them.
    Wow. How offensive. I'll get another mod to deal with it though.
    I have a personal preference for meeting people who are very different and who have come from multicultural backgrounds. I just find that being exposed to very different people results in interesting discussions and the possibility of becoming more open minded through being confronted with ideas, lifestyles and norms you've not considered beforehand.

    5) I'd take a History graduate over an SPS/PPSian every time; when recruiting graduates from Cambridge I chuck all those with an SPS/PPS degree in the reject pile now - it's frightening the frequency with which those graduates leave any given graduate scheme they somehow manage to get onto, they just can't handle it. I'd rather be a tweed-wearing toffy historian with a brain and a bank balance of note than an SPS/PPS graduate without either.
    That's lovely for you.

    I came back to the thread because I remembered that people considering whether to apply for PPS or not might be interested to know that in my final year I had lots of letters through the post from leading consultancy firms and banks all of who had the same thing to say, which was that they felt that PPS bestowed on graduates the skills and aptitudes that those firms were looking for, and would I be interested in applying to them for a job.
    This is in spite of the fact that not once in my entire life have I ever suggested to anybody (e.g. job agency or the University careers service) that I was at all interested in those types of jobs. They merely sent out mass letters to everybody in the third year of PPS. This does rather suggest that there are plenty of employers out there who will take PPS students if you won't.

    Obviously I won't be one of them, seeing as I don't want that sort of job.
    (Original post by bubbly)
    Nobody has anything bad to say about any degree at Cambridge other than SPS, why is that ?
    Actually people take the piss out of Education Studies and Land Economy more than they do of PPS these days. But I wouldn't expect an old fogey like you to know that

    (Original post by Bubblyjubbly)
    A few like-minded souls decided that after the Laura Spence debacle it was about time Oxbridge graduates did something to fight back and save the reputation of the two universities from the populist Oxbridge bashing that one sees so often, with particular reference to the nonsense issue of elitism and degree classifications wherever there exists a forum on such topics online. These are dark times for Oxbridge and unless they come out fighting, we'll go from having two out-and-out world class institutions to having none - if the truth be told, we have little else to brag about abroad now.
    Oh boohoo! :bawling:

    You know most of us don't actually want to brag about having been to Oxbridge :rolleyes: Elitists like you give us a bad name.

    (Original post by bubbly)
    I know you lefty sociopaths love to claim to be the champions of the poor and the needy, but it's amazing just how quickly you resort to abuse when the veneer gets scratched.
    Rest assured bubbly, you take the prize in this thread for chief insultor
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Oh sorry! The West Wing told me that essays tended to be about 1500 words. But I know this sort of thing varies by college.
    No worries! Just setting the record straight--don't like it when people think my degree is less work than it is (any more than you do...).

    (Original post by Craghyrax)

    As to the point about value systems, its not particularly controversial to observe that a large number of people trying to get into finance and law are people who want to be rich and successful. This has got nothing to do with postmodern theory or anything else connected to SPS. Its just straightforward observation and its a fairly neutral point, that most people agree with.
    I don't actually care about being rich and successful. Unless by 'success' one means finding a livelihood that I enjoy and find fulfilling, and having time to spend with people I love. Again several people would be to hand on here to point out that I'm not in the least bit 'conformist'.
    You've just had the misfortune of trying to slap a stereotype onto a very unusual person.
    I think the problem here is a blinkered view of "successful"--Bubbly's vision of success is very different from yours. For me, having a livelihood I enjoy and find fulfilling is crucial--the livelihood that I think will provide that sense of fulfilment is just quite different for me than for you.
    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Actually people take the piss out of Education Studies and Land Economy more than they do of PPS these days.
    Especially land economy... (I have nothing against the course--I know very little about it--but it is often derided.)
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    (Original post by jjarvis)
    No worries! Just setting the record straight--don't like it when people think my degree is less work than it is (any more than you do...).
    Of course. I didn't mean to imply that Law wasn't hard work! It certainly seems to be from all measures. I just meant that it seemed similar. The only thing that does seem worse is that every law student I know comments that the staff are complete *******s in terms of being really critical and insulting to students who even show the slightest sign of weakness.
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    I can't see the attraction of PPS myself.

    But that's what's silly about your question, it's down to personal interest. You need to figure out whether you want to do a psychology + sociology related degree or a philosophy and economics related one. Or maybe even just politics on its own. Are you interested in the non-politics subjects in these courses?

    General question @ PPS applicants; what other courses do you apply for? PPS is the only course of its type in the country, no?
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    (Original post by milkytea)
    General question @ PPS applicants; what other courses do you apply for? PPS is the only course of its type in the country, no?
    There's a Combined Social Sciences degree at Durham which offers more choice in terms of subject combinations. I applied to that back in the day. I've heard there's another University that does something similar but I can't remember where it was.
    My other courses were all Politics. I only realised that I preferred Sociology after the first year of PPS at Cambridge. Cambridge is #1 for Sociology though, (and only #5 for Politics last time I checked) and the teaching was really good. Also the Politics taught at Cambridge is unusually focused on the history of political thought. If that weren't the case I might not have shifted my preference.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    There's a Combined Social Sciences degree at Durham which offers more choice in terms of subject combinations. I applied to that back in the day. I've heard there's another University that does something similar but I can't remember where it was.
    My other courses were all Politics. I only realised that I preferred Sociology after the first year of PPS at Cambridge. Cambridge is #1 for Sociology though, (and only #5 for Politics last time I checked) and the teaching was really good. Also the Politics taught at Cambridge is unusually focused on the history of political thought. If that weren't the case I might not have shifted my preference.
    Ok. Didn't you find it hard to write your personal statement, though? Cos wouldn't you have to talk about psychology and sociology, which wouldn't be very useful for a Politics admissions tutor?
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    (Original post by milkytea)
    Ok. Didn't you find it hard to write your personal statement, though? Cos wouldn't you have to talk about psychology and sociology, which wouldn't be very useful for a Politics admissions tutor?
    No. Cambridge are quite understanding about the fact that people will usually be applying to single subjects elsewhere. There are lots of different strategies people adopt for how to deal with that in their personal statements. Mine was basically focused on issues that interest me which are broadly relevant to loads of subjects including Politics. I didn't explicitly tackle the discipline in it.
    The other thing is that Cambridge give people an SAQ to fill out where they have space for an optional extension to their personal statements. I'm sure many people use this to tack on bits about how they really like the other subjects too :p:

    I actually applied for Biology and Natural Sciences previously and it was a similar thing.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    No. Cambridge are quite understanding about the fact that people will usually be applying to single subjects elsewhere. There are lots of different strategies people adopt for how to deal with that in their personal statements. Mine was basically focused on issues that interest me which are broadly relevant to loads of subjects including Politics. I didn't explicitly tackle the discipline in it.
    The other thing is that Cambridge give people an SAQ to fill out where they have space for an optional extension to their personal statements. I'm sure many people use this to tack on bits about how they really like the other subjects too :p:

    I actually applied for Biology and Natural Sciences previously and it was a similar thing.
    That's fair enough. I guess it's slightly different for PPE as there are a lot more PPE courses available.
 
 
 
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