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How can I enhance my child's intelligence? Watch

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    (Original post by Accalia)
    Books and lego. Especially the books - my mum used to take buy me a few new books every couple of months then just left me to it. I think being given the resources to read at an early age explains why I was (and still am) quite good at English Lit.
    Library every couple of weeks for the young me - suppose the choice of very young kids books is pretty much the same at a Library as at a bookstore but High Street bookshops have beome pretty limited in choice even for slightly older kids books.

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    BTW OP's not necessarily a Frankenstein mum - I do watch my sister with her oldest kid (7) with a bit of dismay, she pushes him hard and he was reading/writing better than the rest of the class since he started but she screams at him when he makes a small mistake. You can see the kids getting more and more anxious as she blows her top - the consequence is the kid now doesn't want to read for his own entertainment even though he's technically getting good enough.
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    I speak for most of TSR when I say I don't have a clue
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    (Original post by her)
    from the 'toddler' stage - book? music?
    When I was younger (from when I was one or two years old) my dad would talk to me about current affairs and his opinions on them as if I could understand what he meant, so I'd pick up complicated things easier.

    They also got me 'Letterland' products, and these white cards with words on ranging from 'nose' to 'conclusion' and used to challenge me to say the words, spell them and explain their meaning, and I'd get toys if I did well all week.

    They taught me about numbers and 'sums' way before i went to school, and would set me addition, subtraction and multiplication questions before my dinner.

    It sounds horrific to anyone who didn't do this sort of stuff as a kid, but i really enjoyed it haha, its just like a fun game when you're a kid.

    I'm not a genius, but I'm more intelligent than the average person.
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    Let him play Black Ops all day on xbox.

    A headset is a must to communicate with fellow 'intellectual' gamers. :yep:
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    Do your job as a parent.
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    The only real advice I have is to not place your kid too close to the TV, Microwave or other electrical device. I get really annoyed when a baby is sleeping right next to a TV

    You can also get "walkers" that have little interactive things on them ie: triangle shapes and triangle blocks. The odd book would also help here really

    When they're older, if you can afford it pay for some private tuition at weekends. If it's done at an early enough age, it should become habit. If it's done a little later, they may hate you for it but should see it as a good thing in years to come

    Failing that, then obviously it's good to help with their homework etc.. Also, if they take an interest in something geeky ie: literature, maths, computing then nurture it and buy some books for them
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    Don't be a pushy parent.

    But seriously, if you want your kid to be intelligent, the absolutely number one thing is reading. If you read to your child when they're a toddler, and nurture a love of reading early on, then they'll keep on reading and enjoying it, and it will do wonders for their imagination/comprehension/communication skills/general intelligence. And not looooooooads of telly or video games, avoid when very young.
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    (Original post by fran.ha)
    Just generally stimulate their brain by asking lots of questions, discussing lots of things and encouraging them to read?

    Just remember cos you have a clever kid, doesn't mean you'll have a clever adult. I actually think its better to teach more self restraint and motivation etc, I was a bright kid but I've never been motivated thus never managed to get the grades I was capable of achieving.
    Story of my life!
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    (Original post by ilyking)
    no, teach it some fractal geometry
    To be honest if the kid doesn't understand fractal geometry by now there's no hope.
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      (Original post by her)
      from the 'toddler' stage - book? music?
      OK, whatever you do, do not force anything upon the child. Let the child discover for him or herself:

      *Books - buy lots of them of differing ability. Read often to your child as well. But put the books in the bottom-end of the shelves. Through natural curiosity, when your child has developed reading skills, he or she will start to read out of enjoyment. Place some newspapers everywhere (not crap ones). Definitely take your child to the library regularly and if your child wants a particular book, treat him or her by actually buying it.

      *Arithmetic - bold abacuses, buy a chalkboard and perhaps write down a simple equation on it every day. Through natural curiosity, he or she will question the equation. Purchase basic arithmetic books and put on shelf. DO NOT buy a calculator. Buy lots of shapes like colourful hexagons and the like and out of paper and glitter and shells, your child will make their own shapes.

      *Manners/discipline - enough said. Don't be too forceful nor too lenient. Seriously, if there's anything a child needs to learn, it's this. This is where the parent should be actively involved in. Don't involve religion.

      *Creativity - seriously crayons + board + paper = win. Perhaps experiment with a range of art materials like paint and pastels and **** like that.

      *Nature - take your kid out to walks and go to places such as parks, lakes and zoos. Make this a weekly thing. (This is also when your kid can get some form of exercise).

      *Music - instead of indoctrinating your kid with solely classical music, introduce them to other areas of music such as through the decades (50s, 60s, 70s, 80s) and genres (jazz, blues, rock - you know what I mean). However, let your kid enjoy 90s pop music as well.

      *Incentives - whenever your kid does a good thing, give the child 10p or something. Definitely not sweets. Whenever your kid does a bad thing, take it away.

      *Knowledge - purchase lots of colourful encyclopedias including one advanced one. Also introduce your children to basic key facts such as who the Prime Minister and the Queen are.

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        (Original post by Accalia)
        Books and lego. Especially the books - my mum used to take buy me a few new books every couple of months then just left me to it. I think being given the resources to read at an early age explains why I was (and still am) quite good at English Lit.
        Of course - Lego!

        I second this. :yep:
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        Ummm.. more intelligent or more 'book-smart'? The latter is easy, but the former, well thats probably not possible.
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        This is actually a very good question. Please ignore all these white-trash-students here who make fun of you. It is a genuinely good idea to think about how to promote your child(ren) as much as possible. Most here giving just stupid comments probably just know how to make kids, but not how to raise them. An irresponsible mob, in my humble opinion.

        I would like to add some few things. Reading has been mentioned with a focus on reading to the child or with the child. It also has to learn that reading books is something good per se, so that it will do it automatically when grown up. However, the learning process of children is sometimes very subtle. For instance, if you keep on telling how important it is to read books, then the child learns how important it is to say how important this is. If it instead observes you regularly reading books, it will automatically learn that reading books is something desirable. So, please do not fall into the trap of just telling it to lead a "good" life, just live that "good" life you want it to live later on.

        Try to teach him / show him that sacrifices pay off in the long run. There are several experiments showing that if children are offered the choice between one candy now or two candies tomorrow, then those children who take the one candy now will turn out to fare much worse than the other group. I do not want to go into formalities or scientific language now, but please try to convey the message that sacrifices now can pay off later.

        Also: expose your child to as many impressions as possible. As far as I understand the literature on memory and the brain, it works like a cobweb. This is at least an analogy often used. New knowledge is added to that cobweb by taking old parts of the web and building associations / connections with the new knowledge, loosely speaking. That means the larger its stock of knowledge is when entering school, the easier it is to learn new things.

        Last but not least: if you and his father are both English speakers, get rid of the father and date somebody whose first language is different (or take equivalent actions). It can be shown that the brain structure of children who have been raised bilingual is significantly different from other children (but this process indeed has to start as early as possible). Also, bilingually raised children fare typically better.

        Best of luck for you and your child, and keep on going with your reasonable and involved approach to upbringing. Way too many people just treat children like pets that you just need to feed sometimes. But this is truly not how it should be.

        (ij)
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        Stop dropping it.
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        This book is an excellent tool for teaching your child how to read, when he or she is ready for it.

        I taught my daughter to read with the help of this book when she was 4, and now she's 5 and her reading level is 9-11 (whereas other 5-6 year olds apparently are reading level 6, according to her teacher).

        http://www.amazon.co.uk/Teach-Your-C.../dp/0671631985

        I had a go with my 3 year old a couple of months ago but he wasn't ready yet. I may try again in a couple of months and see if he's ready yet. If not I'll wait a little longer.
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        One Word ' LEGO' and anything bricks invite hawking around he might teach him a few words of microsoft Sam
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        I urge you to watch http://www.amazon.co.uk/James-Mays-T.../dp/B002GV4OO4
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        (Original post by cybergrad)
        Start with differential equations this year.
        I'm dissapointed....

        I would expect the child to be on at least a Phd by the age of 3

        differential equations...pah....your child my good sir will be a retard due to your negligence and lack of proper tutoring....
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        Your child has a plastic brain. Make them smart before their NMDA receptors mature. At this stage more Ca++ can enter during activation, which increases the number and effectiveness of AMPA receptors, the assembly of the post-synaptic actin cytoskeleton, and also triggers retrograde signals (i.e. neurotrophins and NO) to enhance the presynaptic machinery. Your child is destined to be a prodigy. Make useful connections - go, go, go!
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        I was given a copy of Twenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea for my eighth birthday, shortly before my mother introduced me to Terry Pratchett's Discworld. I heartily recommend both.
       
       
       
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