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    (Original post by Potiron)
    If you're waiting for say Oxford to get back to you, and don't want to make Durham your firm or insurance until you've heard, they can't whip your offer away after ten days, surely? That would be mean.
    I think they meant post-results day...
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    I think they meant post-results day...
    Makes more sense. I think I missed that.

    You're right though, I wouldn't want to risk it.

    Feel free to facepalm me in the best TSR tradition
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    (Original post by Potiron)
    Makes more sense. I think I missed that.

    You're right though, I wouldn't want to risk it.

    Feel free to facepalm me in the best TSR tradition
    They can't set their own deadline for you to reply to their offer - UCAS set that and it depends on when you applied and on when you get all replies back.
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    They can't set their own deadline for you to reply to their offer - UCAS set that and it depends on when you applied and on when you get all replies back.
    That's what I thought.

    I seem to remember my OH last year getting an email from either Oxford or Durham saying that they'd like her to firm them by a certain date. She just ignored it though.
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    (Original post by Potiron)
    If you're waiting for say Oxford to get back to you, and don't want to make Durham your firm or insurance until you've heard, they can't whip your offer away after ten days, surely? That would be mean.
    I don't think you quite understand the system. You can't accept any offer until all your choices have replied to you with either an offer or a rejection. In any event, Oxford's decisions are made before Christmas, well before the acceptance deadline.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    I don't think you quite understand the system. You can't accept any offer until all your choices have replied to you with either an offer or a rejection. In any event, Oxford's decisions are made before Christmas, well before the acceptance deadline.
    I don't think I do, and I didn't know that. I was under the impression that if you'd got the offers you wanted you could withdraw your applications your other choices. Thank you.
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    (Original post by Potiron)
    I don't think I do, and I didn't know that. I was under the impression that if you'd got the offers you wanted you could withdraw your applications your other choices. Thank you.
    You can do that, but it isn't necessarily a good idea. When you have seen the other univerities you might change your mind. In general, you should definitely take your time to consider all the options and make these decisions. In August and September TSR is full of people who have madepoorly-considered decisions and are wondering how to extricate themselves from the situation they are in.
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
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    I have asked about this elsewhere but would appreciate your opinions. My offer changed before I firmed it - it was ABB and then it was AAB without any warning. I'm going to write an email to admissions to ask why this happened. I thought this was quite cheeky really, unless there was something wrong with my application. It just seems a bit out of order, though as far as I know since I hadn't firmed it by then, they have no obligation to change it back if it isn't because of a falsehood in my application.

    My question is do I have a right to be indignant and say/imply/try persuade them to change it back while asking why they changed it?
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    (Original post by takethyfacehence)

    My question is do I have a right to be indignant and say/imply/try persuade them to change it back while asking why they changed it?
    You have the right to do or say anything that is legal but the university has the right to leave the offer as it is and that is the most likely outcome. Before you go sounding off I'd think carefully about the impression you might create on the admissions tutor - you want them on your side when they receive your results in August.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    You have the right to do or say anything that is legal but the university has the right to leave the offer as it is and that is the most likely outcome. Before you go sounding off I'd think carefully about the impression you might create on the admissions tutor - you want them on your side when they receive your results in August.
    thanks for your reply. how would you suggest to ask them about it? when i think of wording it, it sounds very formal and detached, and i don't want it to sound as if i don't care - i very very much care about this!
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    (Original post by takethyfacehence)
    i very very much care about this!
    You need to realise that venting your frustration won't help. Just because you feel strongly does not mean it is a good idea to let them know it. If it is so important for you to know, you should just ask a neutrally-worded question about why the offer was changed and maybe ask if it could be reinstated as it was. Nothing more: no emotion, no comment, no gushing supposed-enthusiasm-but-actually-desperation. Writing this email (particularly if you ask for a lower offer) will obviously reveal your anxiety over your performance, which isn't usually a good idea. Confident poeople wouldn't ask anything - you can always ask your tutor when you get there. I wouldn't expect anything to change.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    You need to realise that venting your frustration won't help. Just because you feel strongly does not mean it is a good idea to let them know it. If it is so important for you to know, you should just ask a neutrally-worded question about why the offer was changed and maybe ask if it could be reinstated as it was. Nothing more: no emotion, no comment, no gushing supposed-enthusiasm-but-actually-desperation. Writing this email (particularly if you ask for a lower offer) will obviously reveal your anxiety over your performance, which isn't usually a good idea. Confident poeople wouldn't ask anything - you can always ask your tutor when you get there. I wouldn't expect anything to change.
    thank you, what i needed to hear.
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    (Original post by takethyfacehence)
    I have asked about this elsewhere but would appreciate your opinions. My offer changed before I firmed it - it was ABB and then it was AAB without any warning. I'm going to write an email to admissions to ask why this happened. I thought this was quite cheeky really, unless there was something wrong with my application. It just seems a bit out of order, though as far as I know since I hadn't firmed it by then, they have no obligation to change it back if it isn't because of a falsehood in my application.

    My question is do I have a right to be indignant and say/imply/try persuade them to change it back while asking why they changed it?
    Good bloke's covered most of what I would have said, but the other point I would bring up is you've already firmed it. The time to bring up the question of why has it changed was the day you noticed it had changed. By firming you, you acknowledged that it had changed and you were fine with that change, still thought it achievable or worth a shot; would seem very odd if you went in guns blazing now.

    The impression the admissions tutor is likely to get is, you know you're not going to achieve your offer and so are making a big deal over this so you can get it back to a lower offer - never a good thing to have them believing. You want to be able to argue that any low grade is an unprecedented blip, not something you can do if you saw it coming.

    Frankly, I think you're better off forgetting this e-mail.
 
 
 
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