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Hunters Society Watch

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    Normally, clubs and ranges have a "probation" period, where you have to attend for 6 months, using the guns they have there. When that's over, they will sponsor your application, so if you're planning on joining a gun club, you need to do it before you apply for a licence. Have a look on the club's website, and check about their probationary periods.

    Presumably, this will be to stop people turning up at a range, getting a rifle, putting a silencer on it, then going hunting, when in reality they're not licenced to.


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    (Original post by Mohid Khan)
    yep studying at college in south lon
    Cool. I'm east.
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    (Original post by Rottweiler22)
    Normally, clubs and ranges have a "probation" period, where you have to attend for 6 months, using the guns they have there. When that's over, they will sponsor your application, so if you're planning on joining a gun club, you need to do it before you apply for a licence. Have a look on the club's website, and check about their probationary periods.

    Presumably, this will be to stop people turning up at a range, getting a rifle, putting a silencer on it, then going hunting, when in reality they're not licenced to.


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    cool, so they provide you with all the equipment?

    and is this the case for an air rifle range too?
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    (Original post by ILovePancakes)
    Cool.

    So what did you hunt in Germany
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    (Original post by Mohid Khan)
    So what did you hunt in Germany
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    Oh no, I haven't. I was too young. My granddad and my dad used to though, like rabbits and pheasant and wild boar.
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    (Original post by Mohid Khan)
    cool, so they provide you with all the equipment?

    and is this the case for an air rifle range too?
    I don't think so, I think they're just pay and turn up. Air rifles have none of the legal issues, whereas firearms do.


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    (Original post by Rottweiler22)
    I got my S410 about 7 years ago, and it was about £650 scoped. They're both the same inside, just with a different action, the S410 being a side-lever, rather than bolt action. The S510 has an integrated silencer aswell.



    In terms of ease to acquire the more powerful the calibre is, the more difficult they are to get: an FAC air rifle (over 12ft/Ibs) is the easiest, followed by a .22LR rimfire, then a .17HMR rimfire, then the centerfire calibres, which are used for foxes and deer.



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    What are rim and centre fires.
    Another question what is a 357 classed as. And do they even exist

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    Rimfire and centerfire rifles are just types of cartridges they take. Rimfire cartridges are struck on the rim by the firing pin, whereas centerfires are obviously struck in the centre.

    Rimfires are smaller, and less powerful, .22LR and .17HMR being the most common. They're good for hunting small game, such as rabbits, corvids, general vermin, etc.

    Centrefires tend to be bigger, much more powerful, and are used by military firearms. Common calibres are .223, .243, and .308, which are used for hunting foxes, deer, etc.

    As for a .357, I think that's a pistol calibre. I haven't heard much about it in the UK, tends to be big in America.


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    Thanks

    the Benjamin 357 has like 300ftlb of energy. And apparently some ppl have them in the UK.
    Is this a myth ?

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    (Original post by Rottweiler22)
    Rimfire and centerfire rifles are just types of cartridges they take. Rimfire cartridges are struck on the rim by the firing pin, whereas centerfires are obviously struck in the centre.

    Rimfires are smaller, and less powerful, .22LR and .17HMR being the most common. They're good for hunting small game, such as rabbits, corvids, general vermin, etc.

    Centrefires tend to be bigger, much more powerful, and are used by military firearms. Common calibres are .223, .243, and .308, which are used for hunting foxes, deer, etc.

    As for a .357, I think that's a pistol calibre. I haven't heard much about it in the UK, tends to be big in America.


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    sorry to sound really dum, but rimfires are not pellets are they?
    can you use rimfires in pcps?
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    The Benjamin Rogue is just a high-calibre air rifle, and I'm sure that you can get them in the UK. The beauty of FAC air rifles, is that your license covers all powers, whether it be 12.5ft/Ibs or 300ft/Ibs. Get a license for an FAC air rifle, and you can have whatever power you want.

    A rimfire is a type of bullet, just like any other bullet you will see. You don't use them in airguns, you use pellets. Airguns just used compressed air to fire a piece of lead. .177 air rifle pellets cost around £8 per 500, and fly at around 800fps, whereas .17 rimfire bullets cost around 25p each, but fly at around 2500fps, meaning much more power, much more range, but are also more expensive, and you need a license.


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    (Original post by Rottweiler22)
    The Benjamin Rogue is just a high-calibre air rifle, and I'm sure that you can get them in the UK. The beauty of FAC air rifles, is that your license covers all powers, whether it be 12.5ft/Ibs or 300ft/Ibs. Get a license for an FAC air rifle, and you can have whatever power you want.

    A rimfire is a type of bullet, just like any other bullet you will see. You don't use them in airguns, you use pellets. Airguns just used compressed air to fire a piece of lead. .177 air rifle pellets cost around £8 per 500, and fly at around 800fps, whereas .17 rimfire bullets cost around 25p each, but fly at around 2500fps, meaning much more power, much more range, but are also more expensive, and you need a license.


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    Cool
    There is a separate licence for air rifles (over 12 ftlb), centre fires , shotguns and high powered rifles. Right?

    Thanks again :yy:



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    This thread is absolutely disgusting, promoting the blood shed of animals for enjoyment. Honestly don't know why you think it's your right to hunt and terrorise animals. And the fact you consider it a sport is even more offensive.

    Losers.
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    (Original post by Ripper-Roo)
    This thread is absolutely disgusting, promoting the blood shed of animals for enjoyment. Honestly don't know why you think it's your right to hunt and terrorise animals. And the fact you consider it a sport is even more offensive.

    Losers.
    Please remember shooting is a sport just like archery.

    As for hunting, it is necessary, for example if you don't want bird crap in the food you buy, you need to get rid of the birds at the manufacturing plant and doing this may require taking out some birds. I really don't see the problem with this. Do you really want bacteria in your food? :rolleyes:

    And how is it different to fishing,

    I really don't understand the point you are trying to make.

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    (Original post by Mohid Khan)
    Cool
    There is a separate licence for air rifles (over 12 ftlb), centre fires , shotguns and high powered rifles. Right?

    Thanks again :yy:



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    Yeah, there's a firearms license (FAC) and shotgun license (SGC).

    I'm against hunting for the sake of it, ie. Just going out, shooting a few rabbits, and throwing them in the bin. We need to draw a line between "hunting" and "pest control", which is what I do.

    If the animals are causing damage, then it is justified. Foxes come and take our chickens, deer eat and destroy our saplings (which we will eventually sell), and squirrels moved into our owl box, killing the family of owls that lived inside (I found the dead owls on the ground underneath it). Pigeons and rabbits also cause damage to crops, so when people say that killing animals is wrong, they need to think about the livelihood that the animals affects.

    Think of how frustrating it is, to raise chickens from eggs, incubating some of them yourself, feeding them everyday, seeing them grow. Then a fox decides to turn up, kill them all for the sake of it, then leave, and someone, somewhere tells me shooting them is wrong. I don't think so.


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    (Original post by Ripper-Roo)
    This thread is absolutely disgusting, promoting the blood shed of animals for enjoyment. Honestly don't know why you think it's your right to hunt and terrorise animals. And the fact you consider it a sport is even more offensive.

    Losers.
    This isn't really the place to enter into a debate over the ethics of Hunting.

    If you want that argument PM me, otherwise I would politely ask to refrain from posting material that is not in keeping with the Society.
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    (Original post by Three Mile Sprint)
    This isn't really the place to enter into a debate over the ethics of Hunting.

    If you want that argument PM me, otherwise I would politely ask to refrain from posting material that is not in keeping with the Society.
    I think it does concern other people because it's killing animals for no reason. I'll leave it at that, but don't expect people to not comment.
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    (Original post by Rottweiler22)
    Yeah, there's a firearms license (FAC) and shotgun license (SGC).


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    just decided the AA s510 is the best rifle for my needs (long range target shooting), can't wait- probs getting in like a year or so. what do you think

    and how comes a 177 gives less shots than a 22, doesn't a bigger pellet require more air
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    .177 is the best for target shooting, as it has a flatter trajectory than a .22.

    .177 is a smaller, lighter pellet, that travels faster, but doesn't have the "stopping power" of a bigger, heavier, but slower .22 pellet. Thus if your only concern is target shooting, then .177 would be the best way to go.

    I've never owned a .177, so I wouldn't know about air economy, but you will need either a buddy bottle or stirrup pump to keep charging your S510 with. That's at least £100 on top.

    I'm really tempted to go back to my roots and buy a decent .177 spring plinker, like an Air Arms Pro Sport, or TX200.


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    (Original post by Rottweiler22)
    .177 is the best for target shooting, as it has a flatter trajectory than a .22.

    .177 is a smaller, lighter pellet, that travels faster, but doesn't have the "stopping power" of a bigger, heavier, but slower .22 pellet. Thus if your only concern is target shooting, then .177 would be the best way to go.

    I've never owned a .177, so I wouldn't know about air economy, but you will need either a buddy bottle or stirrup pump to keep charging your S510 with. That's at least £100 on top.

    I'm really tempted to go back to my roots and buy a decent .177 spring plinker, like an Air Arms Pro Sport, or TX200.


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    Yea a very tough decision. But I think I will go for the 177 because I have seen people take out doves at 100yd and huge rabbits at 30yd. So I guess its all about shot placement.


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