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    (Original post by daisydaffodil)
    I've lived in a village all my life and love it, advantages being that there were only 14 people in my class, all my teachers lived within ten mins drive of the school, all the school staff are family friends.. Freedom, peace and quiet - we can go to the beach in the summer at nighttime and be the only people there, it's a three mile stretch so lovely. Can walk through the fields in summer to my friend's horses/sheep.. It sounds ridic. but we used to go raspberry picking too!.. We're only 30 miles north of the nearest city, and ten miles south from the nearest town - however most people I know only go through once a month or so .. Everyone knows everyone and there's always somebody there when you need them .. Can leave your back door unlocked too ! Disadvantages - a poor bus service, everyone knows your business, there's only a part time GP surgery, with one doctor and one nurse.. only three shops and only one sells mags, booze and that.. when it snows you get completely cut off, however miss a lot of school due to it... I think it depends where said village is - because I live in Aberdeenshire, the whole flipping area is villages, mountains and beaches so it's the norm for everyone! I do miss it when I'm at uni!
    But for arguements sake lets say your friend lives in a different village 13 miles away and you have to rely on a bus to go and see them, thats another disadvantage as it just completely closes social networks. All of that you described as advantages can be done where i am and if not a short drive is all that is required to do it in the peak district, lovely part of the uk. All of this and the niceness of things to do and fun to be had
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    (Original post by Sphipsta)
    If you lived with my family then i think you would be yearning to live in a city, to me a job comes with peace rather than stress with living with them, that brings me nicely onto another point of why move where family is and why is extended family like parents and grandparents important to be close by ? they drag you down.
    If people make money in villages then why isnt Alan Sugar holed up in a little welsh village rather than London
    The family-related issue:

    Ok, so one of the main reasons why you dislike the village you live in right now isn't the village itself but rather the fact that you live with your family.
    I don't know your circumstances but getting a job or going to the university should help you leave that place.

    The extended-family issue:

    That's interesting, I took part in a debate on whichever is the better familial model, the extended family or the nuclear family (doesn't relate with nuclear energy, don't worry) and many sociologists are concerned with this.
    Personally, I believe any family can decide on its' own which option fits better.

    "The Alan Sugar" issue:

    He was in London and probably his relations were important in making the decision to stay in London.
    I don't want to suppose that he also has a house in the countryside and loves going there when he affords.
    My point is that there are also other rich, better or less-known people who live in the countryside and I could come with many examples.
    Alan Sugar isn't rich due to the fact he lives in London!
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    I live in a village and its ****.
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    (Original post by Sphipsta)
    But for arguements sake lets say your friend lives in a different village 13 miles away and you have to rely on a bus to go and see them, thats another disadvantage as it just completely closes social networks. All of that you described as advantages can be done where i am and if not a short drive is all that is required to do it in the peak district, lovely part of the uk. All of this and the niceness of things to do and fun to be had
    So just as you could drive out to the Peak District, us village folk can hop in our cars and go and see our mates. The whole 'isolation' from friends argument really doesn't apply these days, as I suspect most people can either drive themselves or have somebody who's prepared to give them a lift.
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    i live in a tiny village but it's not the type where everyone knows each other, or at least i don't
    i quite like living here because yes it's peaceful and low in crime
    but i s'pose it's true not being able to get anywhere easily; although we have a great bus service which goes to the closest town and straight through to the closest city which i've becomes accustomed to using so i s'pose that solves that
    although everyone in the whole rural area seems to want to leave to go to a more urban area/travel the world, but it's surprised the amount of older generations who have done that, yet come back (especially after having their children) so it can't be all that bad
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    (Original post by mike_mike)
    The family-related issue:

    Ok, so one of the main reasons why you dislike the village you live in right now isn't the village itself but rather the fact that you live with your family.
    I don't know your circumstances but getting a job or going to the university should help you leave that place.

    The extended-family issue:

    That's interesting, I took part in a debate on whichever is the better familial model, the extended family or the nuclear family (doesn't relate with nuclear energy, don't worry) and many sociologists are concerned with this.
    Personally, I believe any family can decide on its' own which option fits better.

    "The Alan Sugar" issue:

    He was in London and probably his relations were important in making the decision to stay in London.
    I don't want to suppose that he also has a house in the countryside and loves going there when he affords.
    My point is that there are also other rich, better or less-known people who live in the countryside and I could come with many examples.
    Alan Sugar isn't rich due to the fact he lives in London!
    Thing is i dont live in a village, i live in an overgrown village thats become a very small town. However surrounding area contains many little villages and i just keep thinking why would anyone want that life style. Family yes can be an absolute nightmare and i think the nuclear family ie husband wife and kids would get along a hell of a lot better without family interfering in your affairs which happens more frequently in smaller communities
    Alan Sugar wouldnt of been able to build up his business empire if he hadnt of lived in London. Sure he must love visiting somewhere quiet, key emphasis on the visit though, i am not disputing the fact they are nice i am just questioning why it should be a permanent thing
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    (Original post by daisydaffodil)
    I've lived in a village all my life and love it, advantages being that there were only 14 people in my class, all my teachers lived within ten mins drive of the school, all the school staff are family friends.. Freedom, peace and quiet - we can go to the beach in the summer at nighttime and be the only people there, it's a three mile stretch so lovely. Can walk through the fields in summer to my friend's horses/sheep.. It sounds ridic. but we used to go raspberry picking too!.. We're only 30 miles north of the nearest city, and ten miles south from the nearest town - however most people I know only go through once a month or so .. Everyone knows everyone and there's always somebody there when you need them .. Can leave your back door unlocked too ! Disadvantages - a poor bus service, everyone knows your business, there's only a part time GP surgery, with one doctor and one nurse.. only three shops and only one sells mags, booze and that.. when it snows you get completely cut off, however miss a lot of school due to it... I think it depends where said village is - because I live in Aberdeenshire, the whole flipping area is villages, mountains and beaches so it's the norm for everyone! I do miss it when I'm at uni!
    What significance does teachers living within 10 miles have?
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    (Original post by Sync)
    So just as you could drive out to the Peak District, us village folk can hop in our cars and go and see our mates. The whole 'isolation' from friends argument really doesn't apply these days, as I suspect most people can either drive themselves or have somebody who's prepared to give them a lift.
    I dont rely on going to the peak district though, i could live without it, i love going to sheffield, being emersed in culture and generall having a good time, why would i want to crunch leaves when i could just go clubbing
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    (Original post by Sphipsta)
    Currently in a large town and i have heard one siren. went to sheffield and i probably heard about four. I think people can be misguided. To me what you just described is absolute hell. I find myself far too busy to grow my own food. I enjoy just popping to the supermarket because i can pick up some bargains, its warm and i occassionally meet people i know. Amenities is something a city will always have over a village
    I still cant understand why anyone would choose this life unless its the only one they know
    Accept it and move on. All you're doing is insulting those who choose a different way of life than your own :rolleyes:

    Before you jump on the defensive you have said that people who live in a village are "out of the loop with current affairs". TVs and cars aren't only for city folk you know.
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    (Original post by Kaykiie)
    Accept it and move on. All you're doing is insulting those who choose a different way of life than your own :rolleyes:

    Before you jump on the defensive you have said that people who live in a village are "out of the loop with current affairs". TVs and cars aren't only for city folk you know.
    I am just interested though as i want to know why people want to live this way, it genuinly interests me as i think its a bizzare thing to do. Lets face it your average typical villager isn't up to date with current affairs, and god forbid it if it snows and the roads shut. It really annoyed me when i heard about complaints about being isolated, the people chose that lifestyle so whatever it throws at them they should deal with it, if anything they should be thankful that way they can be more anti social
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    (Original post by Little_My)
    Villages aren't as wholesome as you think, there can be a lot of racism, homophobia and mistreatment of young people in some esp if the majority of the population are old and conservative.
    Literally everyone in mine is either a farmer or a chav. I guarantee you will be bored stiff within a month if you lived in one.
    It can also be really expensive, having to pay a lot of money to get a train or bus to go anywhere.
    I don't know about that but if I compare a big city (Birmingham, London , Leeds, Sheffield etc.) it definitely has more of that behaviour than a village has.
    "Old and conservative" isn't the same with "bad"
    People who decide that living out of a city is for them, surely aren't looking for lots of pubs and organized concerts so I wouldn't be bored.. doubledot's post appealed me..we had enough drum and bass and even if I want to go to cities..I can make the money for traveling while i'm in the countryside, but I can't make the clean air, forest or raw milk in my apartment.
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    I would love to live in a village, I think it would be great.
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    (Original post by Sphipsta)
    why would i want to crunch leaves when i could just go clubbing
    Why would I want to go clubbing? Crap music, massive queues and expensive. Would much prefer to get all my mates round mine and make our way through a few crates whilst listening to music of our own choice at stupidly high volumes. Then at the end of the night, rather than having to get a bus or taxi back home, we can head out into the fields around my house with quad bikes and shotguns and act like hicks. All without disturbing anyone. That sounds infinitely more fun to me...but I suppose it depends on the type of person you are.

    I couldn't stand living in a city (got a student house in Manchester and wouldn't like to be there permanently). I guess many city folk feel the same way about the living in countryside. But the whole "village folk are isolated simpletons who are missing out on so much" idea is utter *******s...and has been ever since the invention of the internal combustion engine.
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    (Original post by mike_mike)
    I don't know about that but if I compare a big city (Birmingham, London , Leeds, Sheffield etc.) it definitely has more of that behaviour than a village has.
    "Old and conservative" isn't the same with "bad"
    People who decide that living out of a city is for them, surely aren't looking for lots of pubs and organized concerts so I wouldn't be bored.. doubledot's post appealed me..we had enough drum and bass and even if I want to go to cities..I can make the money for traveling while i'm in the countryside, but I can't make the clean air, forest or raw milk in my apartment.
    Village behaviour is far worse than that of any city. The close knit *****ing and unwanted attention from people being on the top for most hated part of living in a village
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    (Original post by Sphipsta)
    Currently in a large town and i have heard one siren. went to sheffield and i probably heard about four. I think people can be misguided. To me what you just described is absolute hell. I find myself far too busy to grow my own food. I enjoy just popping to the supermarket because i can pick up some bargains, its warm and i occassionally meet people i know. Amenities is something a city will always have over a village
    I still cant understand why anyone would choose this life unless its the only one they know
    I lived smack dab in Manchester city and not an hour would go by without hearing a siren or drunkards fighting and shouting. It wasn't even like I was living in a shifty part of the city, because I was in Deansgate. So I can definitely say it's not the 'only one I know'. That entire lack of understanding begins to border on arrogant presumption rather than slightly more forgivable ignorance. And, logically, there would be more disruptive noise in a city than in the countryside because of the high density population/construction noise/traffic/social life etc.

    And okay, to you it may sound like absolute hell. To me, it doesn't. Hence why I said before that people are different and they're going to like living in different places. Where people would rather live doesn't really affect you and so you shouldn't really be overly concerned or criticizing of it.
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    (Original post by mike_mike)
    I don't know about that but if I compare a big city (Birmingham, London , Leeds, Sheffield etc.) it definitely has more of that behaviour than a village has.
    "Old and conservative" isn't the same with "bad"
    People who decide that living out of a city is for them, surely aren't looking for lots of pubs and organized concerts so I wouldn't be bored.. doubledot's post appealed me..we had enough drum and bass and even if I want to go to cities..I can make the money for traveling while i'm in the countryside, but I can't make the clean air, forest or raw milk in my apartment.
    Sorry you won't get any raw milk XD It isn't like bambi or snow white....
    I'm aware conservative isn't 'bad', just these people are old conservative and very against anything thats not British and 'correct' (in their eyes...)
    And (usually racist, go to any pub and you will find out) old people aren't people I would naturally associate with as a young person, I don't find old ladies very interesting I'm afraid.

    Oh well, I hope you enjoy WI meetings and young farmers clubs with ye olde mens pubs ;o;
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    (Original post by Sphipsta)
    I am just interested though as i want to know why people want to live this way, it genuinly interests me as i think its a bizzare thing to do. Lets face it your average typical villager isn't up to date with current affairs, and god forbid it if it snows and the roads shut. It really annoyed me when i heard about complaints about being isolated, the people chose that lifestyle so whatever it throws at them they should deal with it, if anything they should be thankful that way they can be more anti social
    Accept that not everyone wants to go clubbing and live in a city. Its not hard to understand. :rolleyes: You say you're just interested yet you've ****ged off everything about villages because you dont like it and assume everyone else thinks that way.

    And ffs you tool, of course people in villages are up to date with current affairs. :facepalm2:
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    (Original post by doubledot)
    I lived smack dab in Manchester city and not an hour would go by without hearing a siren or drunkards fighting and shouting. It wasn't even like I was living in a shifty part of the city, because I was in Deansgate. So I can definitely say it's not the 'only one I know'. That entire lack of understanding begins to border on arrogant presumption rather than slightly more forgivable ignorance. And, logically, there would be more disruptive noise in a city than in the countryside because of the high density population/construction noise/traffic/social life etc.

    And okay, to you it may sound like absolute hell. To me, it doesn't. Hence why I said before that people are different and they're going to like living in different places. Where people would rather live doesn't really affect you and so you shouldn't really be overly concerned or criticizing of it.
    I lived in Chesterfield for the most part of my life then moved to sleepy dorset. What i have is far from presumption, i am living in my hell. Noise isnt a bad thing, clubs and pubs are fun. silence as it can be golden can also become tiresome and lonely.
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    I live in a village and to be honest, whenever I've stayed with friends in cities I've missed the greenery and space. Guess I'm just a country girl at heart.
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    (Original post by CB91)
    Accept that not everyone wants to go clubbing and live in a city. Its not hard to understand. :rolleyes: You say you're just interested yet you've ****ged off everything about villages because you dont like it and assume everyone else thinks that way.

    And ffs you tool, of course people in villages are up to date with current affairs. :facepalm2:
    How do you know that, so you are telling me that some old nosey person living in a village knows about political tensions then ? of course not, as long as they have food on their table and gossip to monger after they are happy. i am talking out of experiance so dont facepalm you tool.
    I dont assume people think my way i am voicing my viewpoint and requesting others give me theirs. Its not a hard concept, tool
 
 
 
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