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    (Original post by J_Alom)
    So I want to teach myself Latin (GCSE and upto A-level standard)- but I want to do it without going to classes or paying for a tutor.

    If anyone has done latin, could they recommend any books that I could use?

    N.B: I dont have a time limit, I want to learn for the sake of it.

    Thanks in advance!
    Have you had any experience in Latin before? I learnt with Cambridge Latin Course, and then at GCSE Virgil VI, Caesar's Druids texts and Boudica. Latin is hard, I would never have been able to do it without lessons for five years.
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    (Original post by DeeWave)
    Maybe use Cambridge Latin Course?

    Caecillius est in Horto ...
    Caecillius est in horto sedet
    Aah... memories.
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    We used the Oxford books in S1-S3, though I think they've now switched to CLC - my wee sister does Caecilius. The Oxford books are great anyway, and Flaccus has stayed with me, a talisman through Higher Latin . Some of the older books are good too, though I don't know how you'd get a hold of them nowadays. I do Latin as an extra subject this year, with a friend, and we get about 1 hour a week after school. We pretty much know the grammar, it's not much harder than last year, but what we sometimes do is get an old book (can't remember the name) and it has good English to Latin stuff, which makes you think about it more and is really good practice.

    Also, I love Virgil. ibant obscuri sola sub nocte per umbram/perque domos Ditis vacuas et inania regna/quale per incertam lunam est iter in silvis etc. Is it sad that I remember that without checking it :P?
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    (Original post by AutumnChappy)
    Is it wrong that I actually enjoyed Virgil?!
    Not at all - I enjoyed it, when I was doing the GCSE.

    It's years later when I can still remember most of it, but can't remember the proofs of various things I need for my completely unrelated degree that I start to believe Virgil is evil!
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    (Original post by AutumnChappy)
    Is it wrong that I actually enjoyed Virgil?!
    No, not at all, unless there's something wrong with me as well.

    (Original post by derangedyoshi)
    ibant obscuri sola sub nocte per umbram/perque domos Ditis vacuas et inania regna/quale per incertam lunam est iter in silvis etc. Is it sad that I remember that without checking it :P?
    That pretty much sums it up.
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    (Original post by EEngWillow)
    Virgil is definitely evil. If I ever have to see the Aeneid again, I will not be held responsible for my actions. Give me Cicero any day.
    Completely agree.

    (Original post by AutumnChappy)
    Is it wrong that I actually enjoyed Virgil?!
    Yes. So so wrong.
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    I did GCSE Latin at school and taught myself A Level Latin two years later for fun. You can definitely do it for GCSE easily, but for A Level I missed the interesting discussions you get into with your teacher/classmates about texts and so on. So it's perfectly possible, but not as fun.

    And for all the people who say the typical things about "it's a dead language." Apart from the fact that I simply enjoyed studying it, I have found that it has made it easier for me to learn Spanish and Italian as it gives you an excellent understanding of grammar. Also it improved my logical thinking and literature analysis skills, as well as sharpening my memory (all those passages of text and vocab that I had to learn off by heart!). The historical context of the texts is also explored and gave me a very good insight into the beginnings of western civilisation (if civilisation is the right word, most of the Roman goings-on were pretty barbaric and very violent) e.g. the Senate and politics.
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    I started teaaching myself Latin from scratch from the CLC books, but found that it was very difficult to understand the grammar after the first few books- they tend to introduce new grammar points by putting them in stories, then explain them a few pages later. Also, it was quite easy in the beginning to not worry about learning cases or tenses, which meant I struggled as it got more complex. However, if you're disciplined enough to learn the grammar sections at the back of each book by heart, then they're very entertaining

    As for other books, I would highly recommend Kennedy's Revised Latin Primer, if it hasn't already been mentioned (which I assume it has). It's a great reference tool for declesions, conjugations, sentence constructions etc etc. Also, a decent Latin dictionary would probably be a good investment (probably something a bit heftier than the Pocket Oxford Latin Dictionary- that's what I have at the minute and I'm struggling to find all the vocab for Ovid's Amores in there).

    Hope that helped!
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    (Original post by DeeWave)
    'Caecillius is in the garden'

    It's a classic phrase from the first translation IIRC. Anyone who's done Cambridge Latin Course will remember it fondly!
    I remember that, I also remember asking my guide to show me where Caecilius's house was when I went to Pompeii.
 
 
 
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