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    Get a Labrador! Very good natured breed and my first dog was one! Gentle as you like, generally seem to be big softies. Not extremely energetic like a husky or a border collie, but still plenty active! Few have complicated grooming requirements either. May just be biased, though.

    Also, I would disagree that rescue dogs always have issues/discipline difficulties. My old dog was a rescue dog and she was perfectly well adjusted and behaved (until she got deaf/stubborn in old age, of course lol).
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    (Original post by Lylat)
    We had a German Shepherd from a police dog breeding centre (he wasn't suitable to be a police dog) so we bought him.

    Heres some pictures:


    Omg adorable!!!
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    It annoys me this myth that once dogs have gone past 6 months/1 year old, that they can't be taught new behaviours or corrected in their bad habits. It's *******s.
    That's it lol
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    My first dog came late in life and I don't really count the ones my folks had, the one my gf brought home because she felt sorry or the one I got guilted into buying to keep the stray mutt company

    I bought a doberman a few years ago and she's really cool. Worst guard dog EVER! but she has a sweet temperament and never bites.

    Dave
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    (Original post by Emaemmaemily)
    It annoys me this myth that once dogs have gone past 6 months/1 year old, that they can't be taught new behaviours or corrected in their bad habits. It's *******s.
    That's it lol
    Absolutely - my two rescues were about 12 months and 3 years when we got them, had clearly never lived in a house and were therefore not housetrained and had clearly never been treated as pets and been taught any standard commands such as 'sit'. Within a couple of days my OH and I had them doing things like sitting, staying and giving paw on demand and after about the first week we had them fully housetrained. In fact, it's actually been easier to train the older one than the younger one. I'm always slightly sad we didn't have them as puppies, but only because I know they didn't exactly have a great start in life, not because it's made them difficult to work with.
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    This is our first dog shes a labradoodle, and the sweetest thing in the world, she is quite big too as her dad was a standard poodle, shes in my avatar too leaning on the babygate so you can see how big she is, but shes so gentle and fun and i love her very much
    You cant go wrong with a labradoodle

    Apologies but i really dont know how to get the picture any smaller! haha!
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    (Original post by theciz)
    Get a Labrador! Very good natured breed and my first dog was one! Gentle as you like, generally seem to be big softies. Not extremely energetic like a husky or a border collie, but still plenty active! Few have complicated grooming requirements either. May just be biased, though.

    Also, I would disagree that rescue dogs always have issues/discipline difficulties. My old dog was a rescue dog and she was perfectly well adjusted and behaved (until she got deaf/stubborn in old age, of course lol).
    This. We've got 2 and they are fantastic although they are getting on a bit now. The older one was my first dog and he's so easy going, always has been. The other is a bit more highly strung but that's a product of something that happened when she was a puppy but she's a great guard dog.
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    I have a little terrier, hes just so cute
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    we had a labrador crossed with i think a border collie. she was so loveable. she lived to the grand age of 14 (we lost her 8 weeks ago) and i'd thoroughly recommend a labrador (cross or other) as they are loyal, loveable. they do need lots of walks though and are prone to arthiritis so you'd have to keep an eye on it. they#re great with children, whatever. so lovely
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    A Labrador or a Retriever. They are such great dogs.
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    (Original post by Charlski)
    Absolutely - my two rescues were about 12 months and 3 years when we got them, had clearly never lived in a house and were therefore not housetrained and had clearly never been treated as pets and been taught any standard commands such as 'sit'. Within a couple of days my OH and I had them doing things like sitting, staying and giving paw on demand and after about the first week we had them fully housetrained. In fact, it's actually been easier to train the older one than the younger one. I'm always slightly sad we didn't have them as puppies, but only because I know they didn't exactly have a great start in life, not because it's made them difficult to work with.
    Exactly.
    We didn't know Bonnie's (our rescue dog) history at all, because she'd been abandoned before being taken to the rescue centre, but the vet estimated her age a around 3 years.
    She could sit, and was house trained, but didn't know anything else (obviously had to get used to the name we gave her), and was scared of everything.
    We socialized her, got her to over-come her fears (which included cars, water, bridges, bikes... etc), and taught her plenty of new "tricks" and commands.
    She's an amazing dog, just so good natured.
    She currently has a problem of being terrified of other dogs, but it's because she has been attacked a first times and yet again we're working on it.

    What a stupid myth that you can't change/shape a dog and fix behavioural issues when they're not puppies.
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    My first dog is a labrador cross breed called Marlowe. I picked him up in a dog's home in Warrington. I remember him sitting there looking really sad, in need for an owner and then he got us. I'm so delighted that I chose him. At first he didn't get on with dogs at all and he had to wear a muzzle but he's become much better now. I think he had a hard past before we got him. He's the sweetest most lovely dog you could imagine!
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    (Original post by MrsCrackFox)
    Aaaw, I envy you! I wish I still had one, they have to be one of my favourite breeds of dog.
    So loving and loyal. And I have never seen a cuter puppy. :yep:

    When your dog has her food, d'you have to tie her ears up? We used to always tie our cocker's ears up loosely in a bobble because they would always go in her food. She'd look so cute!
    Aww that's really cute what you used to do with your dogs ears No, we don't do that...never actually thought about it to be honest, but everytime she eats she always ends up with wet ears as her water is in the same bowl (although separate area) as her food :p:
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    Thanks for all your advice

    Does anyone have any experience with a Great Dane?
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    (Original post by 1.2.3.)
    Thanks for all your advice

    Does anyone have any experience with a Great Dane?
    I fostered a great dane for a short time. Only about 3 weeks but he was an absolute angel.
    He was very well looked after before his owner (a vet) died and was very well behaved so long as we stuck to our rules (We let him on the bed one time and we spent the next 2 weeks having to retrain him to stay off.)
    Half the reason he came in to foster care was because he was such a sensitive dog they thought that the kennel environment would be too stressful for him.

    The only downsides were that he struggled with my stairs, we had to make adaptations like raising his food and water bottles and making sure anything we didn't want him to get was in cupboards he couldn't get in to because he was absolutely huge and could reach everything.
    And the biggie, that we just couldn't rough house with him! I couldn't play chase either because he'd always catch me, often knocking me to the ground.

    It's particularly important for great danes to have constant reinforcement of the rules. You have to get them trained young because it can be difficult once they are bigger than you and can physically overpower you.

    They are lovely dogs, but I wouldn't say they are very suitable for first time owners.
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    (Original post by death.drop)
    I fostered a great dane for a short time. Only about 3 weeks but he was an absolute angel.
    He was very well looked after before his owner (a vet) died and was very well behaved so long as we stuck to our rules (We let him on the bed one time and we spent the next 2 weeks having to retrain him to stay off.)
    Half the reason he came in to foster care was because he was such a sensitive dog they thought that the kennel environment would be too stressful for him.

    The only downsides were that he struggled with my stairs, we had to make adaptations like raising his food and water bottles and making sure anything we didn't want him to get was in cupboards he couldn't get in to because he was absolutely huge and could reach everything.
    And the biggie, that we just couldn't rough house with him! I couldn't play chase either because he'd always catch me, often knocking me to the ground.

    It's particularly important for great danes to have constant reinforcement of the rules. You have to get them trained young because it can be difficult once they are bigger than you and can physically overpower you.

    They are lovely dogs, but I wouldn't say they are very suitable for first time owners.

    Thanks for the advice! Yes they are absolutely huuugee, gorgeous though I'm just looking round all of the options really
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    if you want a big dog i suggest a Lab, its the best, and he will be the best first time pet. Labrador Retrievers adjust according to the owner so he should be fairly easy to handle.
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    Can we stop all the stories of staffie attacks please? These dogs have a poor enough rep as it is and they are usually fab dogs to have,

    OP i can only eco what everyone else has said but i really think you should go to a rescue home and pick something from there. Homes are usually very honest about who thier dogs will suit. You need to read up on dogs and how to look after them and i recommend once you have a dog to go to some training classes, itl help you to look after the dog and will help you to bond.

    Each dog is different, they do have personalities but i would always try and chose to rescue a dog then give money to breeders (unless i was looking for a working dog, totally different).
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    (Original post by Trigger)
    Can we stop all the stories of staffie attacks please? These dogs have a poor enough rep as it is and they are usually fab dogs to have,

    OP i can only eco what everyone else has said but i really think you should go to a rescue home and pick something from there. Homes are usually very honest about who thier dogs will suit. You need to read up on dogs and how to look after them and i recommend once you have a dog to go to some training classes, itl help you to look after the dog and will help you to bond.

    Each dog is different, they do have personalities but i would always try and chose to rescue a dog then give money to breeders (unless i was looking for a working dog, totally different).
    I totally agree about the staffy bashing they are wonderful and lovely little dogs and any dog has the potential to be aggressive if brought up in the wrong environment. Unfortunately it seems people who provide these environments often opt for staffys! I agree they are lovely and ought to be given a chance
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    Staffy!!!

    And deffo go to a rescue centre. There are so many poor dogs who need homes and will be so grateful to have a loving family. Staffy-crosses are common in rescue centres, and they're such loving, caring dogs.
 
 
 
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