30-year-old mum wants to study medicine Watch

Subcutaneous
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#41
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#41
(Original post by Wangers)
With the greatest of respect, if you want to sell nursing, sell it because it is a different, but vital role - not because the candidate might not be able to do medicine. It shows very little respect to both your medical and nursing colleagues.
Did I say that she can't? No.

She's at the start of exploring options, and I'm just saying don't rule it out before you get work experience- many still consider nursing to be the poorly paid/easy to get into job it was 20years ago and I was suggesting it's there as an option if she wants to work in healthcare but a more family friendly career.
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Subcutaneous
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#42
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#42
(Original post by Wangers)
And pray tell, what happens when she has to do nursing placements? Isn't it the same arguments why she shouldn't do nursing either? If every possible problem has to first be overcome, nobody would ever get round to doing anything.
No it's different. You get a bit more allowance with placements when you have children with where you go, there are part-time courses aswell for those who want to have more flexibility and when you qualify you can go anywhere. Plus more options with where she can study rather than one uni (I believe there are 3 near her). Obviously do medicine if she wants but like I said before- she's still in the enquiring process and part of that exploring other options.
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Nasher and Basher
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#43
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#43
(Original post by flashnazia)
Am I mad?

Hi, am a newbie and would be very grateful for some advice.

As the title: 30-year-old with a 3-year-old and I want to be a doctor!

I have tried to forget about this 'pipedream' but I just can't get it out of my head.

During my GCSE's I wanted to do it but had zero support. My parents then took me abroad against my wishes so I missed out one year of my GCSEs.

Still managed to scrape 5 Bs (in the important subjects) and 2 Cs (derisory in my opinion).

Picked A Levels - Maths, physics, chem and further maths.

My mum saw my timetable and made me drop one as she didn't want me to do four subjects (she needed me at home).

I decided to drop chem as I was finding it a bit boring and the tutor wasn't very good.

That is when I had to drop the idea. Mum got pregnant in second year of A levels so again, scraped Physics (C), Maths (A), Further maths (D) - mum went into labour day before final exams for this.

Didn't go to uni - parents weren't supportive.

So there we are! Spent the next 12 years working, the last 6 in the voluntary sector but cuts are starting to bite and I may be redundant on sept.

I don't mean to ramble but needed to give background. Also don't mean to paint my folks as complete ogres - they do love me but have problems of their own, depression etc. They now do the childcare for free while I'm at work so not all bad.

So, my concerns if I follow this 'mad' path at this age - sorry - stage!

School run, time with child etc I have no idea what the timetable is like.

costs, esp now that tuition fees are up. partner and I are both on low income and he will be the main breadwinner but may also have to do school run etc meaning he may have to limit his hours too. How will I pay travel fees, and tuition fees especially?

I would only be able to study at Leeds - I know that really limits my options but I have no flexibility to travel further. They have an access course that I am enquiring about.

Lack of medical work exp.

Why do I want to be a doctor? Well, primarily, I love to have a go at solving problems and I like to advise and help others. My mother-in-law suffered from bowel cancer and I went with her to appointments to try and 'interpret' what the doctor was saying (not because of language - she speaks good English) but because the doctor was speaking gobbledegook as far as she was concerned and she was scared etc.

I was drawing diagrams of bowel etc to try and explain to wider family.

My sis just had some probs with blighted ovum and related gynae stuff. Again drew a diagram to explain to others who didn't understand.

I have loads of books of family medicine, etc.

The human bodys - its reactions etc- fascinate me and I want to harness this interest and use it with my other interest - helping people - so that I can make a difference.

Phew!
On the Bradford clinical science course for entry to Leeds medicine, there was a woman that got through that was in her mid twenties with two children and there quite a few mature students- I say go for it.

Or I would say intensive A-levels, but its up to you. If need be, you could do the A-levels distant learning and get a job in healthcare or keep your job, that way you can work. And congratz on making the first move, most people would not feel confident to say that they want to do something completely different to what they have been doing.
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Nasher and Basher
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#44
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#44
(Original post by Nutta!)
I would do an intensive A level course and get top marks in these.

Then apply.

Do Chem, Bio, and 2 other a levels you haven't done before.

Do a transfer course maybe? But I would do A levels though- I do the acess course near Leeds as well
Would you not recommend the Bradford, clinical science course- foundation year ?
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Nutta!
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#45
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#45
(Original post by Nasher and Basher)
Would you not recommend the Bradford, clinical science course- foundation year ?
Not in her case- she hasn't done the Science levels recently.

Well would you? I haven't done Foundation year.
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Nasher and Basher
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#46
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#46
(Original post by Nutta!)
Not in her case- she hasn't done the Science levels recently.

Well would you? I haven't done Foundation year.
Yes, for foundation year. Its great preparation, and there is a higher chance of getting in from the interview stage.
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Gizmo!
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#47
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#47
oi, 30 year old momma!

ave you been watching this -

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Vital-Signs-DVD/dp/B000EWOO88
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puddleduck
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#48
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#48
Absolutely go for it! My friend's mother had no science qualifications, but at the age of fifty something she did the A Levels, got into medical school, and has just qualified as a doctor. You go girl
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theatrical
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#49
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#49
(Original post by Egypt)
How come the neg?! I wasn't aware of selection of medical applicants being made on age, insurance or tax costs?!
Wasn't me I don't think, if it was it was made in error - I most probably meant to neg rep the other guy.

Either way, sorry
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Egypt
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#50
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#50
(Original post by theatrical)
Wasn't me I don't think, if it was it was made in error - I most probably meant to neg rep the other guy.

Either way, sorry
No worries, thought i had missed something massive in medical student selection, I know I applied a while ago but didnt think things had changed that much!
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Cyanohydrin
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#51
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#51
(Original post by puddleduck)
Absolutely go for it! My friend's mother had no science qualifications, but at the age of fifty something she did the A Levels, got into medical school, and has just qualified as a doctor. You go girl
I think that training a 50 year old is a complete waste of money. Neg me down, but why spend £300K on somebody who will work for just 10ish years?
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Nutta!
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#52
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#52
(Original post by flashnazia)
Thanks for the replies. Some of them have been most helpful esp the ones about older applicants on other people's courses - made me feel much better!

I've asked for info from Leeds about their next open day in June - hopefully that will give me some more insight. Can anyone give me some pointers on the best dept to contact for more info; is it the medical dept direct?

I realise that I am severely limiting myself but I can't uproot my family and Leeds is the easiest place to get to from the rural-ish place I live in - still half-hour train ride away on rickety half-hourly trains!

Not sure if Bradford do it too but that will be reachable by car only and don't think my budget can cope with the petrol and parking plus driving hassle.

So thanks again for taking the time to help me (those that have added something constructive that is, I noticed there were a few nutty posts that have been deleted- made me laugh though!)
Excuse me? Elaborate?

You won't get on to the Foundation Course anymore- they are being abolished...

So only way to to do the Bradford course is via Year 1- through that you'd have to do A levels- so you may as well do it properly through UCAS.
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Wangers
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#53
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#53
(Original post by Cyanohydrin)
I think that training a 50 year old is a complete waste of money. Neg me down, but why spend £300K on somebody who will work for just 10ish years?

As opposed to people who will take a medical degree and do other things? I know people now who already have a back door after full registration planned, and with increasingly incompetent government meddling, who can blame them?
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Cyanohydrin
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#54
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(Original post by Wangers)
As opposed to people who will take a medical degree and do other things? I know people now who already have a back door after full registration planned, and with increasingly incompetent government meddling, who can blame them?
I would agree, there are some variables you can't control and short of turning medicine into some sort of military with a court martial style system for people who want to leave - people will leave - and an ever increasing number for the reasons you mentioned. That said, I do believe training somebody who will enter F1 at 55 does seem like a missallocation of funds to me :dontknow:
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Joseppea
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#55
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#55
Good luck whatever you decide to do though
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Gizmo!
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#56
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(Original post by Cyanohydrin)
I would agree, there are some variables you can't control and short
yes you could control them.

you could, for instance, take on only people who are over 40.

Pretty much all of them would work in medicnie for the next 20 years, and not drop out like a fair chunk of those who joined as school leaver.

all you've done here is prove yourself wrong. Some advice, dont pretend you have knowledge about people/matters of whom you have no knowledge of whatsoever at this stage in your life.
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Gizmo!
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#57
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#57
(Original post by Cyanohydrin)
I think that training a 50 year old is a complete waste of money. Neg me down, but why spend £300K on somebody who will work for just 10ish years?
sorry to burst your bubble, but people are neg repping you becos YOU ARE WRONG.
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Cyanohydrin
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#58
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#58
(Original post by Gizmo!)
sorry to burst your bubble, but people are neg repping you becos YOU ARE WRONG.
really? I assumed it was because they agreed with me :eek:

I stand by it, I think training somebody up to work for 10 years is a waste of money.

I don't think 40 is too old, but why fund somebody to train as a medical student who will be a doctor for about 10 years?
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Renal
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#59
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#59
(Original post by Gizmo!)
sorry to burst your bubble, but people are neg repping you becos YOU ARE WRONG.
I agree with Cyanohydrin to an extent, I think that the cost of medical education is a huge investment by the government and arguably should to be done carefully where it will most benefit the country. Obviously, that could apply to applicants' age, nationality even religion () and many would argue that this is wrong ethically, but not economically.
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thisismycatch22
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#60
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(Original post by Gizmo!)
yes you could control them.

you could, for instance, take on only people who are over 40.

Pretty much all of them would work in medicnie for the next 20 years, and not drop out like a fair chunk of those who joined as school leaver.

all you've done here is prove yourself wrong. Some advice, dont pretend you have knowledge about people/matters of whom you have no knowledge of whatsoever at this stage in your life.
a 50 year old entrant would give 10 years or so of work in medicine before retirement, best case scenario. a school leaver has over 40. if we look at the number of consultant years, the difference would be even more stark. Is the attrition rate from working in medicine really enough to compensate for this? where's your evidence for this?

i'm coming into medicine later than most, but this claim seems to be more a part of your endless quest to **** off school leavers who want to do medicine rather than any sort of logical argument. don't make economic arguments unless you're not just pulling numbers out of where the sun doesn't shine
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