Learning to cook! Watch

Juno
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#41
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#41
There's loads of free recipe books if you search google, and although they might not all be suitable if you have laods you can pick your favourite recipes and make your own book!
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54201
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#42
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#42
www.uktvfood.co.uk

Even better than the BBC and they have video recipes which is cool!
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sunday
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#43
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#43
oooh another nice site, although they look a bit more complicated to me :p:
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smilee172
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#44
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(Original post by Nessyfencer)
We'd make an ace team then! Would have no food, but an ace team all the same :confused:
haha yeh it would be an ace team.. a hungry team but yeh ace
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supercat
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#45
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Didn't someone mention a Wikipedia cookbook before?
EDIT: Found it: Cookbookwiki. It's not quite as good as I remember it though.
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black_mamba
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#46
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The bbc food website is really really good for inspiration, another one is Sainsbury's recipe search, I think you can even search by what ingredients you have available (very useful): http://www.sainsburys.co.uk/food/recipe/default.htm

But starting out from a website can be daunting, theres so much choice and a lot of sites don't include pictures.

Buying a good book with pictures is definitely a good investment if you can't cook. It's taken me 4 years at uni to learn - I only really started getting into it when I ignored all that dull traditional studenty food; spag bol, curries, con carni...don't get me wrong, they can taste ok, but you will get sick of them. Experimenting on your own is probably a bad idea too. When you go to restaraunts you like try and emulate the food at home or remember the combination of flavours that worked. This works better with simple & cheap dishes of course.

Watching ready steady cook is another great idea; you'll learn from that what flavours work well together so you can improvise recipes even if you have no book/website or specific meal in mind.

Another thing I've found helpful is finding a famous chef whose recipes I particularly liked. If he/she is on telly quite a bit I can steal their recipes or eventually buy their book (and the bbc stock a few of their recipes too). Mines Gary Rhodes, his stuff is often very simple, cheap and still yummy.

Oh oh and when you go to supermarkets grab a copy of their free magazines. They always feature recipe ideas in them with juicey photos.

Good luck.
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wednesburywench
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#47
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i planned to learn to cook last summer, but it didnt happen. when i got there everythin was fine, and i experimented here n there and now can cook enough to get me by. Chicken is so versitile, i think a george forman is a welcome investment. Buy the basic meats and spitz them up. Buy some sweet chili sauce to pour on chicken. erm....the spices u can get from asda for a quid each r amazingly useful, piripiri is great. buy some soy sauce for stir frys. i also find the flavoured chinese and italian oxocubes spice up stir frys/pasta. cheese is nice for pasta. garlic adds a bit of flavor to chicken if your frying it. onions always nice.
curry powder...put some in rice when you boil it and it tastes lovely. mash potatoe is easy and yummy...add cheese and put in the oven and u got cheese and potatoe pie. yea...cooking is easy just improvise lol
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wednesburywench
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#48
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#48
nosh 4 students the book is a good basic cookbook. the chicken curry recipie is simple and very very tasty!
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HappyH
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#49
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#49
My mum bought me 'nosh4students' and another book, 'How to boil an egg', a few months ago. I haven't actually used them yet, but flicking through them both, they have some good recipes, and include things like shopping lists and advice on how long food can be kept for, etc.
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sunday
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#50
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Well I just cooked sweet and sour chicken from a recipe off the sainsburys site, and it was alright! Didn't taste like anything out of the jar/takeaway, but it got eaten
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Becca28
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#51
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#51
i can make chicken fajita wraps now from scratch!! tho i do still struggle to even fry or boil an egg...
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henryt
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#52
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Boiling eggs well is actually really hard! When most people cook, it's done by sight and smell, taste and ocassionally touch. Obviously, you can't do any of these without taking the shell off the egg, so don't be disenheartened by boiled eggs!!
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4Ed
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#53
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Make sure you always have the following in your store cupboard, and then you can make most simple dishes served in restaurants:

Onions
Garlic
Herbs (basil, thyme)
Potatoes
Rice
Pasta
Chopped tomatoes (tinned)
Salt/Pepper
Cheese
Flour
Vegetable oil (or Extra Virgin olive oil for Italian cooking)
Yeast
Soy sauce (light)
Eggs
Milk

That's enough to allow you to make everything from Margherita pizzas, pasta with tomato sauce, omelettes - plain, cheesy, Spanish etc, pancakes, egg fried rice, baked potatoes, mashed potatoes, roast potatoes, pasta with cheese, and so on.

All the meat/veg/sauce/syrup stuff are just seasonal fancies that you can put in to add variation or nutrition to your meal. Any cooking cupboard would be bare without this stuff.
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popsical
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#54
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(Original post by sunday)
Over the summer I've made it my mission to learn how to cook, before I end up at uni living on noodles and toast
Can anyone reccomend me some cookbooks you've actually used, and are easy to follow please? They don't have to be designed for students either
You will gain the necessary skills required to fix up basic meals. It also helps if you have housemates that can cook! I could not cook much before I started University but can cook basic to mediocre meals. At University, 'proper' meals are rarely cooked, unless it is a special occasion such as Christmas. :p:
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FadeToBlackout
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#55
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#55
I can do a few dishes, but havn't properly learnt. I've spent my first year in catered accommodation, the easy way out!

It's really wierd, I can cook quite well on a camp fire or gas or petrol stove outdoors, but take me to a proper kitchen with an oven and proper hobs and I'm hopeless!

What you can cook will depend on what facilities you have; for example, my accommodation as its supposedly catered has two hobs provided. That's it! So it was pasta and spag bol and things that could be cooked ina saucepan all the way. Ready meals were out, as there's no oven.

We clubbed together to buy a microwave. It was an amazingly good investment!

Anyway, back to the thread. it's probably useful to learn a few basic things like pasta, spag bol, frying and so on as well as a couple of better meals for when you want to be posh or share or whatever; for example, I can make a spaghetti or pasta carbonara from scratch and its amazingly nice but costs quite a bit to get all the ingrediants- more than buying a sauce ready made. But it is far better and perfect for joint, party-style occasions and I've had no complaints about it so far!
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BlackpoolCraig
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#56
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I've started uni this year, and as a vegetarian, student cooking is a bit more challenging. But I enjoy a lot of student favourites, including beans on toast, jacket potato and beans, as well as a few other favourites. I get sainsburys basics pizzas (there isn't a tesco in lancaster, and asda is practically in morecambe) for 89p, and shove loads of toppings on them.

Stir fries are also good, and I make my own version of spaghetti bolognese, which is a good favourite. And whenever soup is on offer, I'll bulk buy it.

But I can tell you one thing about student cooking! No matter how temptd you are, never cook a jacket potato in the microwave. I know it's quicker, but they taste so much better done in the oven!
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bedbug
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#57
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(Original post by BlackpoolCraig)
But I can tell you one thing about student cooking! No matter how temptd you are, never cook a jacket potato in the microwave. I know it's quicker, but they taste so much better done in the oven!
It's true. The time difference is insane but they taste so much better from the oven, definitely.
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cdpuk
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#58
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(Original post by supercat)
Didn't someone mention a Wikipedia cookbook before?
EDIT: Found it: Cookbookwiki. It's not quite as good as I remember it though.
Sure you weren't looking for the book on WikiBooks?

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cookbook

But... um... yea... I can't cook either. I really need to start making an effort

-Chris
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4Ed
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#59
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#59
(Original post by squirly)
It's true. The time difference is insane but they taste so much better from the oven, definitely.
how about half cooking in the microwave and then finishing it off in the oven? that way you save quite a considerable amuont of time still...
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