Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Well let's see you can get a first in Maths or English or German or Biological Sciences .... Why shouldn't double first apply to multiple sets of subjects too?!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Because it's confusing.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by anycon)
    Interesting:
    In June 1874 Wilde won a demyship in classics to Magdalen College, Oxford, where he studied until 1879, having graduated BA in November 1878 with a double first in classical moderations and literae humaniores or greats (classics).
    ODNB
    double-first: any candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Oxford University who takes first-class honors in both classics and mathematics is said to have won a double-first.
    http://human-nature.com/darwin/huxley/notes.html
    They contradict each other.
    No they don't. A double first at Oxford is getting either a first is prelims/mods and finals *or* getting a first in both of specified double subjects (uie. Classics and Maths). At Cambridge, it means getting a first in two parts of the tripos, regardless of which subject they're in.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by EskimoHunter)
    There are "special" firsts which one can acquire. These are called "starred firsts" and are very rare. You can have a starred first, double starred first or triple starred first. The latter has only been awarded three times. Of course, you can achieve a "normal" first as well.
    As has been said, Cambridge only, and this is an Oxford forum.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    So what about congratulatory first, what are they? Bernard Williams apparently got one:

    "He was educated at Chigwell School and read Greats (Classics) at Balliol College, Oxford. After graduating in 1951 with the rare distinction of a congratulatory first-class honours degree, the highest award at this level in the British university system, he spent his year-long national service in the Royal Air Force (RAF), flying Spitfires in Canada."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_Williams
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    A congratulatory first is like Ronseal: the examiner or tutor writes a letter of congratulation to the recipient when the work produced is so outstanding as to deserve it.

    Also (this may be a myth but) I think these few clever people can expect to receive a round of applause from their tutors. :congrats:
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    *or* getting a first in both of specified double subjects
    So can I specify English and general studies?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    if you get a distinction in prelims and a first, do you then get a congratulatory first? what is the rough grade boundary for a congratulatory first?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dave_McDougall)
    if you get a distinction in prelims and a first, do you then get a congratulatory first? what is the rough grade boundary for a congratulatory first?
    Haha no. A congratulatory first is something that the department give out when they encounter a truly remarkable student - like the best they've seen in the last decade. Somebody who's going to go on and revolutionise research or whatever. It's not a thing you can aim to achieve.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bekaboo)
    Haha no. A congratulatory first is something that the department give out when they encounter a truly remarkable student - like the best they've seen in the last decade. Somebody who's going to go on and revolutionise research or whatever. It's not a thing you can aim to achieve.
    Nothing like a good dose of reality to crush people's dreams. :p:
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BJack)
    Nothing like a good dose of reality to crush people's dreams. :p:
    Shh you. What I meant was that it's not like getting a first where you can say "oh if I get a 70 then I will get a first". You have to be exceptional, and that's not something you can judge yourself. I know various people who have topped their years (from departments that have given out c. 1sts) who haven't had one, so clearly it takes more than just being the best person in your year, and who would even aspire to that?!
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bekaboo)
    Haha no. A congratulatory first is something that the department give out when they encounter a truly remarkable student - like the best they've seen in the last decade. Somebody who's going to go on and revolutionise research or whatever. It's not a thing you can aim to achieve.
    Does anyone know whether congratulatory firsts are still awarded?

    Up to the 1970s virtually everyone was vivaed for their degrees but vivas became rare in most schools. Congratulatory firsts are intimately connected with vivas.

    If someone receives a congratulatory first nowadays do they think they have not done particularly well and are border line First-2:1, hence the need for a viva, until they walk into the viva and the examiners applaud.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Does anyone know whether congratulatory firsts are still awarded?

    Up to the 1970s virtually everyone was vivaed for their degrees but vivas became rare in most schools. Congratulatory firsts are intimately connected with vivas.

    If someone receives a congratulatory first nowadays do they think they have not done particularly well and are border line First-2:1, hence the need for a viva, until they walk into the viva and the examiners applaud.
    I know when Susan Wollenberg (Music professor had hers) they sent her a letter telling her what it was first :dontknow:
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Don't forget, guys, that at neither Oxford nor Cambridge are you officially awarded a degree classification - the classification applies to an exam (ie prelims or finals) and not the degree. So any use of the term 'double first' is just a matter of convention at both institutions (as indeed is the fact that it is the final honours school, and not prelims / mods, that is the one people put down as their degree classification!).
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Budgie)
    Don't forget, guys, that at neither Oxford nor Cambridge are you officially awarded a degree classification - the classification applies to an exam (ie prelims or finals) and not the degree. So any use of the term 'double first' is just a matter of convention at both institutions (as indeed is the fact that it is the final honours school, and not prelims / mods, that is the one people put down as their degree classification!).
    There are people who do more than one Final Honour School.

    Ruth Lawrence matriculated in 1983, did FHS mathematics in 1985 and FHS physics in 1986. She couldn't have taken her BA in 1985 because she hadn't kept 9 terms.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Budgie)
    Don't forget, guys, that at neither Oxford nor Cambridge are you officially awarded a degree classification - the classification applies to an exam (ie prelims or finals) and not the degree. So any use of the term 'double first' is just a matter of convention at both institutions (as indeed is the fact that it is the final honours school, and not prelims / mods, that is the one people put down as their degree classification!).
    I'd be fascinated to know how exactly being awarded a classification for the required exams and coursework to complete a degree does not constitute awarding a degree classification (I'm talking about Oxford here by the way).
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Budgie)
    Don't forget, guys, that at neither Oxford nor Cambridge are you officially awarded a degree classification - the classification applies to an exam (ie prelims or finals) and not the degree. So any use of the term 'double first' is just a matter of convention at both institutions (as indeed is the fact that it is the final honours school, and not prelims / mods, that is the one people put down as their degree classification!).
    Really? Because my FHS Results came out as First Class and my transcript says "this is to certify that [Bekaboo] was awarded a First Class degree in Biological Sciences by the University of Oxford."
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bekaboo)
    Really? Because my FHS Results came out as First Class and my transcript says "this is to certify that [Bekaboo] was awarded a First Class degree in Biological Sciences by the University of Oxford."
    Sounds probably to me, although I'm sure I remember my certificate saying something along the lines of "was judged to have fulfilled the requirements of blah in the final honours school of PPE..."
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Teebs)
    Sounds probably to me, although I'm sure I remember my certificate saying something along the lines of "was judged to have fulfilled the requirements of blah in the final honours school of PPE..."
    Yep, I think my certificate doesn't say anything on it, but my transcript does.
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Teebs)
    Sounds probably to me, although I'm sure I remember my certificate saying something along the lines of "was judged to have fulfilled the requirements of blah in the final honours school of PPE..."
    I am pretty sure my BA certificate doesn't refer to my FHS. Obviously my MA doesn't.

    The principal difference is that my BA was conferred by Congregation whilst my MA was conferred by the Ancient House of Congregation and not by the new-fangled Congregation of 1854

    I do however have another certificate from the university which records my Law Mods and FHS Jurisprudence, my degree class and my papers taken but not my marks. I had to produce this to show that I had passed my exemptions to be excused from the Common Professional Examination for lawyers.

    The only evidence I had for my marks until 3 years ago were letters from my tutors. Then I needed to obtain something I had never heard of called a "transcript" from my college to enroll at Cambridge.
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.