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mexican drug cartel butcher 3 men and 2 women, boils them in acid and film it..... Watch

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    (Original post by ESPORTIVA)
    There is even more gruesome stuff than that, an incident in 2010 in the tourist resort of acapulco.

    The remains of two guys (and the hands of others) were scattered everywhere, their skin was ripped off their heads and flung over poles outside a night club. They even severed their genitles and wrote the name of the gang resposible with the guts of one of the men.
    This is the worst thing I have ever seen on the internet.

    And it happened in a tourist resort, where people are on holiday right now..

    Heck one guy I know on this forum is from acapulco ans was out and about when it happened.
    Yeah I was reading about Acapulco the other day, that place is meant to be nuts. I've got family in Mexico and Belize as well, they don't sound like places I want to live to be honest.

    Do you have a link for that by the way? My inbox is empty.
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    (Original post by 2ndClass)
    Yeah they've gotten so much money from this trade that they've started to build underground railways between the US/Mexico border so they've avoid conventional transportation means.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...ana-found.html
    WOW. It's another world :eek:
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    Nasty stuff

    - though might I ask - how would ending the drug war end the violence in mexico?

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't this violence a result of feuds between rival gangs competing in the drugs market?

    If that's the case, then how would stopping fighting them (presumably alongside legalisation) help this at all? They're still going to be the ones best placed to go into business if drugs were legalised, and they'll still be the ones competing for the market surely? Plus if people don't care where they get their product from then they'll likely turn a blind eye to what happens between it being produced and brought to them - basically if violence is involved, particularly if the product is addictive.

    It's the sort of thing which I think could only be solved if you combined legalisation with a massive increase in man-power & financial support to destroy the cartels, nationalise the drugs industry to make it safe and steady (later to be privatised to reliable hands) and in the mean time improving the lot of the people most likely to get involved in gangs in the first place - essentially a root & branch approach with a fresh outlook... the only downside is that it'd take a huge amount of time (likely decades) and financial support (which Mexico doesn't have & would probably need aid from the US & other south american countries), in short, it wont happen any time soon, if at all.

    That's just my thoughts on it anyway.
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    That video was disgusting defiantly the worst thing I've seen on the internet, worse than the foetus soup people in China were eating. Will not be sleeping well tonight.
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    (Original post by S1L3NTPR3Y)
    That video was disgusting defiantly the worst thing I've seen on the internet, worse than the foetus soup people in China were eating. Will not be sleeping well tonight.
    Foetus soup??

    damn, what a ****** up world we live in
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    (Original post by James A)
    Foetus soup??

    damn, what a ****** up world we live in
    People in certain areas of China, believe soup made of foetuses to have many beneficial properties and as a result it was for sale on the black market. The article even included pictures :sick:.

    Someone on TSR was kind enough to share it and scar my mind for some weeks.
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    (Original post by TheHistoryStudent)
    Nasty stuff

    - though might I ask - how would ending the drug war end the violence in mexico?

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't this violence a result of feuds between rival gangs competing in the drugs market?

    If that's the case, then how would stopping fighting them (presumably alongside legalisation) help this at all? They're still going to be the ones best placed to go into business if drugs were legalised, and they'll still be the ones competing for the market surely? Plus if people don't care where they get their product from then they'll likely turn a blind eye to what happens between it being produced and brought to them - basically if violence is involved, particularly if the product is addictive.

    It's the sort of thing which I think could only be solved if you combined legalisation with a massive increase in man-power & financial support to destroy the cartels, nationalise the drugs industry to make it safe and steady (later to be privatised to reliable hands) and in the mean time improving the lot of the people most likely to get involved in gangs in the first place - essentially a root & branch approach with a fresh outlook... the only downside is that it'd take a huge amount of time (likely decades) and financial support (which Mexico doesn't have & would probably need aid from the US & other south american countries), in short, it wont happen any time soon, if at all.

    That's just my thoughts on it anyway.
    Well, they are going to kill each other off regardless. This generation is lost even if you were going to legalise the drug trade tomorrow. It is like with the legalisation of alcohol in the United states. IT took a while for murder rates to drop.

    The only thing legalisation would do is to end the allure that the huge amount of money the drug game has for many poor young mexican men and perhaps send them down different routes.

    I agree that nationalisation would be better initially.
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    (Original post by DorianGrayism)
    Well, they are going to kill each other off regardless. This generation is lost even if you were going to legalise the drug trade tomorrow. It is like with the legalisation of alcohol in the United states. IT took a while for murder rates to drop.

    The only thing legalisation would do is to end the allure that the huge amount of money the drug game has for many poor young mexican men and perhaps send them down different routes.

    I agree that nationalisation would be better initially.
    Everything else has pretty much been tried already, there isn't many options left
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    (Original post by ESPORTIVA)
    Everything else has pretty much been tried already, there isn't many options left
    Yeh. I was just reading about Los Zetas. They are pretty terrifying.
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    Times like these it makes you realise we don't live in such a bad country eh?

    I'm not watching that video, no way.
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    (Original post by DorianGrayism)
    Well, they are going to kill each other off regardless. This generation is lost even if you were going to legalise the drug trade tomorrow. It is like with the legalisation of alcohol in the United states. IT took a while for murder rates to drop.

    The only thing legalisation would do is to end the allure that the huge amount of money the drug game has for many poor young mexican men and perhaps send them down different routes.

    I agree that nationalisation would be better initially.
    But would it though? The market for drugs would still be there surely, and I'd bet any money that even if it was legalised no businessman or woman in their right mind would dare challenge the cartels effective monopoly on production (which they would be able to expand if it were legalised) given their reputation thus far for murder and so forth. Therefore you've still got the same system in place of a monopoly held by violent groups, who would still by vying amongst themselves for the market, and ergo large profits to be had (though it might drop if it were legalised and had to meet standards, but would they really suddenly start to improve methods of production to meet government standards when the government can't defeat them as yet when it's at war with them?), and hence still the allure of trying to make money out of it dragging mexican men into violent lives.

    It's why I think they'd need to be got rid of completely and the industry nationalised to be honest - you need a clean slate, even if it takes a great deal of time and money to get there. Once it's in place then you can sell it off to legitimate business men & women who will adhere to government standards of safety & so forth, but it's the getting there which is going to be tough... the only other way I think you could do it would be to perhaps legalise it and invite the cartels to come round the negotiating table and form a single conglomerate which works together & shares profits... that's even less likely I think and a travesty of justice given what they've done, but what alternatives are there?

    It's an awful situation to be in though... I myself am anti-drugs but clearly the current policy isn't working unfortunately, so you've just got to be pragmatic.
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    (Original post by TheHistoryStudent)
    But would it though? The market for drugs would still be there surely, and I'd bet any money that even if it was legalised no businessman or woman in their right mind would dare challenge the cartels effective monopoly on production (which they would be able to expand if it were legalised) given their reputation thus far for murder and so forth. Therefore you've still got the same system in place of a monopoly held by violent groups, who would still by vying amongst themselves for the market, and ergo large profits to be had (though it might drop if it were legalised and had to meet standards, but would they really suddenly start to improve methods of production to meet government standards when the government can't defeat them as yet when it's at war with them?), and hence still the allure of trying to make money out of it dragging mexican men into violent lives.

    It's why I think they'd need to be got rid of completely and the industry nationalised to be honest - you need a clean slate, even if it takes a great deal of time and money to get there. Once it's in place then you can sell it off to legitimate business men & women who will adhere to government standards of safety & so forth, but it's the getting there which is going to be tough... the only other way I think you could do it would be to perhaps legalise it and invite the cartels to come round the negotiating table and form a single conglomerate which works together & shares profits... that's even less likely I think and a travesty of justice given what they've done, but what alternatives are there?

    It's an awful situation to be in though... I myself am anti-drugs but clearly the current policy isn't working unfortunately, so you've just got to be pragmatic.
    The Cartels only have power because drugs are shipped directly through Mexico. During the 70's/80's, it was shipped largely through the Caribbean and through Miami and that is why the Mexican's were not as powerful. Also, from what I understand, the Mexican Cartels are not really involved in the production of drugs.

    Once, you legalise it, how exactly can a Cartel stop people from growing cannabis in the back yard or someone making crystal meth in their basement?

    Even if you ignore that, how exactly would they be able to stop people from shipping it in from the Netherlands or elsewhere?
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    (Original post by DorianGrayism)
    The Cartels only have power because drugs are shipped directly through Mexico. During the 70's/80's, it was shipped largely through the Caribbean and through Miami and that is why the Mexican's were not as powerful. Also, from what I understand, the Mexican Cartels are not really involved in the production of drugs.

    Once, you legalise it, how exactly can a Cartel stop people from growing cannabis in the back yard or someone making crystal meth in their basement?

    Even if you ignore that, how exactly would they be able to stop people from shipping it in from the Netherlands or elsewhere?
    Well I'll be honest and say I'm not exactly clued up on the situation in mexico, so I don't know where the drugs are grown and so forth (I was just assuming they were grown and sold by the Cartels) , but to answer your questions:-

    Well I imagine they stop it via their reputation pre-legalisation of violence & terror, which unless the government is strong enough post legalisation to contain (which it won't be because it's not at the moment) could, and probably would continue to secure their profits, even if the trade itself is legal. It wouldn't be 100% foolproof no, but I imagine it'd deter most from trying it, at least in mexico itself, across the rest of the world they probably wouldn't be able to do anything, but I think if you were to..."starve them out" so to speak economically, you'd need a large legalised drug trade & method of production in a number of countries all over the world to run them out of business, but again, that would probably be extremely difficult to secure.

    That also incidentally answers your question about how they'd cope with foreign competition - my answer being that they probably wouldn't that much. If anything it might actually spur them on to get (more) organised and produce drugs on an industrial scale, but then, if the government cannot enforce things like labour laws, quality control & the like (though that could arguably come from other country's testing the drugs before they could be sold, though that wouldn't stop them being sold on the street illegally anyway) then they could still perhaps undercut their foreign competitors on costings...
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    You should watch the documentary 'Narco Bling' all about the crazy riches and power the drug lords have. One guy had $200m in cash in his house!
    Look at this to have an idea http://www.gold-producers.com/mexican-drug-lords-home/
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    Did anyone watch the entire video? I did.
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    (Original post by advice_guru)
    That is the most disgusting thing I have ever witnessed. God it was so bad I couldn't even watch all of it, had to stop after the first 2 minutes.

    These people are just pure savage, damn im actually left without words to describe these people.
    Why on earth would you even watch it!?

    It's so weird, you see that kind of thing on horror films, yet there it is, real life footage.
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    (Original post by S1L3NTPR3Y)
    That video was disgusting defiantly the worst thing I've seen on the internet, worse than the foetus soup people in China were eating. Will not be sleeping well tonight.
    The what!? :eek:
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    The rundown:

    Opiates/Heroin is big business for Afghanistan, easily grown, too vast areas of derelict land to monitor. Poppies are grown and heroin is produced. Exported as a powder but depending on the area you live in you can go to smack houses and pay for a hit, or you can buy it in its powdered form.

    Cocaine is good business for Columbia, they can easily get it into America across a stretch of water. Exported as a powder and then for the addicts is cooked as crack, crack is used because the dealers will get 30% more and you can scrape out residue and get 3 hits off what would have usually been 1 line.

    Cannabis tends to be grown where it is going to be used, grow houses are unbelievably common and are around everyone ( strictly speaking )

    MDMA comes from a substance found in trees over in Malaysia, the trees are usually in protected forests and the cartels chop down huge trees just for tiny amounts and boil them up in a casket usually in the woods. This is exported in powder form and usually sent over to Amsterdam where there are many pill manufacturing places, or cut down into powder for pure mdma.

    Ketamine comes from factories out in China i believe or Korea. It is exported as a liquid usually and "cooked" in the destination where it is going to be sold.

    Amphetamine is easy to produce using a few easy to get ingredients (if you know a farmer).

    As with cannabis being harder to smuggle, its more risk/reward and size. For example a gram of cocaine is small, whereas a gram of cannabis is larger. Powders are a lot easier to import because obviously you can fit them in small gaps, compress them etc.

    If you YouTube Drugs Inc. this is how I know all this, its very eye opening and interesting as to what people will put themselves through.

    However with the Mexico situation it appears that you only become affected if you're involved with the Drugs or are very close to someone who is involved with them. Crazy business. I don't know if all that is allowed on here so I apologise if it isn't.
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    I refrain from watching these real life gore clips after I saw one around a year ago (I won't describe it) and all it does is leave you in a worse position than before watching them, unless you're a psycopathic sadist.
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    Can somebody PM me the link for the video?
 
 
 
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