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    (Original post by Mark85)
    That said, to piss around at weight training is just as easy as pissing about with running or going on an elliptical etc. I think that is really what this is all about - how much effort you put into stuff. Sure, going for a light jog is easier than doing 8 sets of 5 squats with your 8rm but conversely, doing 6 x 1k intervals all out is harder than doing a few sets of 10 with your 20rm (which at the end of the day is akin to what a lot of casual weight trainers do). I mean that is effectively what you are saying in your last sentence.

    It also depends on what you count as sucking or not. I mean, the majority of people would have to train pretty hard for a decent amount of time to get, for example, a sub 19 minute 5k.

    I think people just go for an activity that is familiar to them and weight training isn't as common as other activities and in contrast to say, running, generally requires that you actually go and join a gym. Whether people choose to work hard or not is kind of a separate issue as to what it is they train at.

    For me the most spent physically and the hardest I have worked was a race with a mate up Snowdon.
    Exactly. Training is as easy or as hard as you make it, and this applies to both weights and cardio. For me, rowing races 2k+ were the hardest things I remember. The feeling of absolute blinding, burning pain in your legs, arms, lungs, stomach...and then you realise you're only half way through. For me that's physically and mentally tougher than the weight training I did for it (which don't get me wrong is still very tough). Cue the meatheads negging me with 'hurr durr, cardio is EASY LOL'
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    (Original post by Becca)
    This is quite interesting. They have a show here in Norway called "best of the best" which is basically like superstars. The women's version was won by a (not that good) downhill skiier. The men's version was won my downhill world champion Aksel Lund Svindal. The Austrian version was won by former downhill champion Herman Meier.

    I don't think this is a coincidence! I wonder what is is about downhill skiing that makes them such good all-round athletes?

    EDIT: just checked the link you posted. Skiier Alain Baxter won the UK version in 2004. Even more convinced now.
    Not only that he beat Du'aine Ladejo who is a very good athlete...he was actually too good of a gladiator when he was on it, wasn't fair on the contestants.
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    (Original post by Nichrome)
    Exactly. Training is as easy or as hard as you make it, and this applies to both weights and cardio. For me, rowing races 2k+ were the hardest things I remember. The feeling of absolute blinding, burning pain in your legs, arms, lungs, stomach...and then you realise you're only half way through. For me that's physically and mentally tougher than the weight training I did for it (which don't get me wrong is still very tough). Cue the meatheads negging me with 'hurr durr, cardio is EASY LOL'
    That cardio burn when your heart is thumping like it's gonna jump out and you can't suck enough air in, that's why 'weightlifters' avoid running/cardio. It's got nothing to do with gains-- recreational lifters have no competitions.

    Doing max weight training is very tiring on your nervous system though. It's a different kind of fatigue. Most gym goers do 8-12 with a moderate weight and rest and don't really push themselves to that limit.

    Weight training uses different energy systems and it's pretty obvious that cardio (which will deplete all your glycogen) is more strenuous. 15 minutes of HIIT or an hour lifting weights? I know which one I'd rather avoid. I enjoy weights but it doesn't stress your cardiovascular system nearly as much. Totally different purposes, kinda like someone running or doing circuit training and expecting to grow big muscles. So what is the point of this post, indeed this thread? They're not mutually exclusive and have totally different aims.

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    Cardio is boring....I think athleticism is a good thing to have. Saying that I do ride my bike regularly so my heart is getting a decent work out.
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    Weights mostly, but I tend to run twice a week to keep my general fitness up too.
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    If you do weights long enough you'll be getting enough sex for cardio.

    /thread.
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    Cardio cause you can do it anywhere
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    (Original post by Nichrome)
    Exactly. Training is as easy or as hard as you make it, and this applies to both weights and cardio. For me, rowing races 2k+ were the hardest things I remember. The feeling of absolute blinding, burning pain in your legs, arms, lungs, stomach...and then you realise you're only half way through. For me that's physically and mentally tougher than the weight training I did for it (which don't get me wrong is still very tough). Cue the meatheads negging me with 'hurr durr, cardio is EASY LOL'
    Have you got to the monochrome vision stage yet? That's quite intesting.

    Or the other one where you eyes get more and more defocused.
 
 
 
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