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    (Original post by nerevs)
    Hi, I completely see where you're coming from, and am really pleased you've made this thread, because I feel the same, and have got a lot from reading all the responses I'm waiting on an interview result, and although I'd be over the moon achieving an offer, part of me would be equally/more excited not to, because there are so many other things I would love doing in life. A rejection means I could go and study English lit, or music, become a teacher and help young people, or somehow go and get involved in global development and help communities overseas etc. My life course would be so entirely different. Or I could just reapply for med next year...

    Medicine's such a weird one, you can see it from so many different perspectives. Everyone agrees it requires dedication and hard work, and is more of a lifestyle choice than just a job. But you can see it as a constantly stressful, draining, endless nightmare, with mountains of paperwork, deadly hours, textbooks and sitting at a desk forever. Or it can be seen as the privilege of directly helping people when they're at their most vulnerable, in a workplace that is constantly evolving with new technology, meeting and being inspired by new people every day. I have a couple of relatives who are doctors, but were really unsure whether to do it or not. Both said imagine yourself at the end of your life, asking yourself whether you made the most of the privileged life you've been born into.

    The decision is ultimately up to you, and if you're certain medicine isn't for you, don't do it. Yet at the same time, there wouldn't be much harm in at least trying the course for a couple of months - you earned that place. You might love it. Or if you don't, you could stop, reapply next year for English/ psychology and have a gap year learning about life outside of full-time education, travel, see what the world has to offer, find out what you really love without the pressure of teachers/ A levels.

    I'm really sorry about how long and waffley this is! It's late. Best of luck with whatever you decide to do
    i'm glad this has helped you as much as it has helped me, i couldn't find a similar thread myself and felt crazy for having these feelings. i have a fear that i won't enjoy my future lifestyle if i don't take action now, that's my problem. thanks for all the advice, good luck to you too
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    (Original post by SophRose1111)
    the thing is, i have just about a month to decide.... i have researched both a lot, i enjoy the content of the degrees, i enjoy the freedom of choice of career path
    Do you think the benefits of one outweighs the other? Or do you want the self fulfillment with studying a degree that you enjoy?
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    Just another thing for you to think through:

    When I was studying medicine, I met many different people. A lot of them were not here to help people. They came either for job security or got good grades and thought 'Why not medicine?'

    Now to the point I want to make. Some people found medicine difficult. Some loved it. But those people who found anatomy boring and dull found themselves enjoying it later, once they took physiology or psychology, whatever they wanted, they were fulfilled and happy. I saw it in my own eyes, I talked with them and they gained faith that medicine might be for them after all.

    From 300 people who are currently in their first year, I and only 5 others dropped out. 2 of them are going to IT field, 2 to engineering and one wants to become a teacher.

    I need you to think about these points. Please think about job security. Without a doubt, it is more important to like your subject but think through long-term goals. Don't dismiss medicine because it does not look attractive anymore. If I were you, I'd go to uni this year to study medicine. You have time until January 15th if you want to quit. Explore the subject, explore people around you. Talk with your professors about your doubts and you will make a right decision.

    Also as a bonus here is my whole story which you'll find quite interesting I hope:

    Originally, I decided to study in the UK when I was in the 12th grade. I studied hard and scored top grades. I applied to study biochemistry via UCAS. However, nearing the summer was the time when i started to have doubts, it did not seem to be a very great idea to study biochemistry after all. I did not want to work with chemicals, I loathed the idea about being a part of the system which produces more and more toxic drugs which help(and destroy) our society. Also I met with close friend with whom I tried computer programming for the first time in my life.

    I loved it. Okay, no passionately but felt it is interesting, it is creative, you can produce software from the thin air, by just clicking buttons. I was fascinated. From here I practiced programming over the summer however wanted to try medicine and see whether it is for me. I joined local university, studied, talked and understood that medicine is not for me. I'm just not that kind of person. I like being alone, I like solving problems sitting through the nights, brainstorming, failing, failing and finally succeeding. This is a person who I was. I hated anatomy, that boring memorizing, I did not love the commitment which is required in order to become a doctor. Also, I admit, laziness was playing the part but mostly because I did not want to open medicine books anymore. It was dull, demoralizing, boring, I did not resonate with the curiosity of my peers who found cutting through cadavers as interesting activity...I thought: "I do not belong here." And left.

    Since that time I practiced and was solving problems in mathematics, programming and found it a lot more interesting than sheer memorizing and cadavers in medicine classes. I have no idea whether it is my path to become software engineer but I must start somewhere and this is what currently holds my interest for almost half-a-year already. Also, technology offers some security in job market, though my recent aspirations was to find peers who want to solve problems and start our own business, dedicated to solve that problem.

    As you can see, I balance between decent degree, my genuine interest and natural aptitudes. I am good in visualizing, moving 3D objects in my head, constructing and analyzing systems, solving hard abstract problems. I am walking in a maze: many paths are open, many subjects holds my interest but my introverted nature, problem solving abilities and interest in maths/programming might be the right path for me. I don't know, my friend. You have to choose wisely. Don't choose a degree which is not in demand, balance between interests, prospects and your natural abilities. For example, there is a MBTI test in personalityjunkie.com It is accurate, the description of my type(INTP) is almost word to word who I am. Read up on careers your type of people choose. If it shows that you might be suited for medicine, I would consider trying it. You will not lose anything. You are young and everyone has a maze they have to travel to find an exit to your passion.

    I have a friend who traveled this path: Musician, Physics student(dropped out from PhD studies) and found his passion in computers when he was 32 year-old. Not he earns a great living, is happy and advice everyone to search, when you hit the wall, turn around and continue searching for your path. You might search for it a long time but eventually you will find your way.

    You need to think through loads of things. Prospects, interest, goals, talk with doctors if you can...I still encourage you to try medicine. If you find it hard and it does not catch your interest, drop out and re-apply where you think you want.

    Better to search than resign to the job you hate. Failing is essential and thus medicine might help you to start the search.

    BTW, in the university you will meet great deal of people who might offer you their insights, give you inspiration and...you know Take care.

    P.S. I don't know why I wrote so much. I guess because it calms me and reinforces my path through this life..
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    (Original post by SophRose1111)
    I am currently in upper sixth, and applied to do medicine this year. I currently have 2 offers to study medicine at East Anglia and at Imperial college. However, I am starting to have second thoughts about this. Throughout college I had never known what I wanted to do with my life and I still, to this date, would rather not decide. I did work experience over last summer and I realised the practice of medicine is truly inspiring and I felt as if I had some of the qualities which would suit me to this career. I read up on things, did more work experience, and I really did enjoy it. My main motivation being that I would help people. My application was frantic, I wrote my personal statement within a week of 'knowing' I wanted to do medicine, which is not even close to how long my fellow medics have known they wanted to do medicine. I simply did not have enough time to think, and I was hugely encouraged to apply.

    But since January I have been starting to have second thoughts, about the long training course, about the fact that it would hugely influence my lifestyle, about the fact that I have a strong interest in Psychology, and also English, and that I would be just as happy doing either of these degrees, if not more. I knew that these thoughts must have been brought about due to the stresses of applying to do medicine, so I shunned them off, but they kept recurring, and over the past month I have been regretting my frantic application more than anything.

    I have never been one for prestige, I feel that I would rather have happiness within myself, which I do know is brought with the rewarding nature of medicine, but from speaking to junior doctors I know that a lot of the time the stress and the pressure overrides the rewarding nature of the degree and career. I really enjoy change, and I really do not want to embark on a set career path from the age of 18. I would rather do a non-vocational degree which would allow me to decide what I want to do in a couple of years. I would love to do a degree which would give me a big variety of career opportunities, as I really do have interests in a range of different careers.

    PLEASE do not respond with a lecture on how people would do anything to secure a medicine place, I believe I worked just as hard as those people who have not got a place, I definitely wanted this at the time, I did not fake my interview and in reward I got these places. I do understand that it is hugely unfortunate that there are people who have been reapplying to do medicine for years now with no luck, I seriously, seriously do. I wish them the best of luck and hope they are rewarded for their efforts and ambitions.

    My question is, do you think I should withdraw my medical application, on the basis that I do not want it half as much as other people, would not make a good doctor as a result, and I would much more ENJOY the variety of career options a non-vocational degree offers?
    I am in your position, kind of! I'm in year 12 and I feel like medicine is for me but at the same time I feel like I'm rushing into this. I'm still not sure on myself but I have time whereas you don't. My advice is like the others, you should try medicine and see because you never know without trying! I'm sure that even after two months, if you don't feel like it's for you then you can drop out and take a gap year and explore your options I doubt universities would care whether you dropped out or not. And don't feel guilty for having two offers, at the time you were sure medicine was for you and you worked hard so you deserve those offers!
    I think just calm yourself and see whether you'd like to try medicine and see how if goes, or whether you'd rather take another route if you're absolutely certain you don't want to go ahead in medicine. Good luck with whatever you choose!


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    (Original post by SophRose1111)
    I am currently in upper sixth, and applied to do medicine this year. I currently have 2 offers to study medicine at East Anglia and at Imperial college. However, I am starting to have second thoughts about this. Throughout college I had never known what I wanted to do with my life and I still, to this date, would rather not decide. I did work experience over last summer and I realised the practice of medicine is truly inspiring and I felt as if I had some of the qualities which would suit me to this career. I read up on things, did more work experience, and I really did enjoy it. My main motivation being that I would help people. My application was frantic, I wrote my personal statement within a week of 'knowing' I wanted to do medicine, which is not even close to how long my fellow medics have known they wanted to do medicine. I simply did not have enough time to think, and I was hugely encouraged to apply.

    But since January I have been starting to have second thoughts, about the long training course, about the fact that it would hugely influence my lifestyle, about the fact that I have a strong interest in Psychology, and also English, and that I would be just as happy doing either of these degrees, if not more. I knew that these thoughts must have been brought about due to the stresses of applying to do medicine, so I shunned them off, but they kept recurring, and over the past month I have been regretting my frantic application more than anything.

    I have never been one for prestige, I feel that I would rather have happiness within myself, which I do know is brought with the rewarding nature of medicine, but from speaking to junior doctors I know that a lot of the time the stress and the pressure overrides the rewarding nature of the degree and career. I really enjoy change, and I really do not want to embark on a set career path from the age of 18. I would rather do a non-vocational degree which would allow me to decide what I want to do in a couple of years. I would love to do a degree which would give me a big variety of career opportunities, as I really do have interests in a range of different careers.

    PLEASE do not respond with a lecture on how people would do anything to secure a medicine place, I believe I worked just as hard as those people who have not got a place, I definitely wanted this at the time, I did not fake my interview and in reward I got these places. I do understand that it is hugely unfortunate that there are people who have been reapplying to do medicine for years now with no luck, I seriously, seriously do. I wish them the best of luck and hope they are rewarded for their efforts and ambitions.

    My question is, do you think I should withdraw my medical application, on the basis that I do not want it half as much as other people, would not make a good doctor as a result, and I would much more ENJOY the variety of career options a non-vocational degree offers?
    I admire your bravery for not falling into that trap that you have to take an offer to study medicine just because everybody else wants it. Why waste another year trying medicine only to drop out? To be honest, first year in med school won't tell you a lot-it's mostly going to be lectures and unlikely to involve any clinical exposure.

    I would strongly advice you not to pursue medicine if you're having doubts this early. Go and see a good careers counsellor or a career coach. You need help in choosing what career will maximise your gifts and talents and the best prospects. Go for your heart! Good luck.


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    (Original post by Valentas)
    Just another thing for you to think through:

    When I was studying medicine, I met many different people. A lot of them were not here to help people. They came either for job security or got good grades and thought 'Why not medicine?'

    Now to the point I want to make. Some people found medicine difficult. Some loved it. But those people who found anatomy boring and dull found themselves enjoying it later, once they took physiology or psychology, whatever they wanted, they were fulfilled and happy. I saw it in my own eyes, I talked with them and they gained faith that medicine might be for them after all.

    From 300 people who are currently in their first year, I and only 5 others dropped out. 2 of them are going to IT field, 2 to engineering and one wants to become a teacher.

    I need you to think about these points. Please think about job security. Without a doubt, it is more important to like your subject but think through long-term goals. Don't dismiss medicine because it does not look attractive anymore. If I were you, I'd go to uni this year to study medicine. You have time until January 15th if you want to quit. Explore the subject, explore people around you. Talk with your professors about your doubts and you will make a right decision.

    Also as a bonus here is my whole story which you'll find quite interesting I hope:

    Originally, I decided to study in the UK when I was in the 12th grade. I studied hard and scored top grades. I applied to study biochemistry via UCAS. However, nearing the summer was the time when i started to have doubts, it did not seem to be a very great idea to study biochemistry after all. I did not want to work with chemicals, I loathed the idea about being a part of the system which produces more and more toxic drugs which help(and destroy) our society. Also I met with close friend with whom I tried computer programming for the first time in my life.

    I loved it. Okay, no passionately but felt it is interesting, it is creative, you can produce software from the thin air, by just clicking buttons. I was fascinated. From here I practiced programming over the summer however wanted to try medicine and see whether it is for me. I joined local university, studied, talked and understood that medicine is not for me. I'm just not that kind of person. I like being alone, I like solving problems sitting through the nights, brainstorming, failing, failing and finally succeeding. This is a person who I was. I hated anatomy, that boring memorizing, I did not love the commitment which is required in order to become a doctor. Also, I admit, laziness was playing the part but mostly because I did not want to open medicine books anymore. It was dull, demoralizing, boring, I did not resonate with the curiosity of my peers who found cutting through cadavers as interesting activity...I thought: "I do not belong here." And left.

    Since that time I practiced and was solving problems in mathematics, programming and found it a lot more interesting than sheer memorizing and cadavers in medicine classes. I have no idea whether it is my path to become software engineer but I must start somewhere and this is what currently holds my interest for almost half-a-year already. Also, technology offers some security in job market, though my recent aspirations was to find peers who want to solve problems and start our own business, dedicated to solve that problem.

    As you can see, I balance between decent degree, my genuine interest and natural aptitudes. I am good in visualizing, moving 3D objects in my head, constructing and analyzing systems, solving hard abstract problems. I am walking in a maze: many paths are open, many subjects holds my interest but my introverted nature, problem solving abilities and interest in maths/programming might be the right path for me. I don't know, my friend. You have to choose wisely. Don't choose a degree which is not in demand, balance between interests, prospects and your natural abilities. For example, there is a MBTI test in personalityjunkie.com It is accurate, the description of my type(INTP) is almost word to word who I am. Read up on careers your type of people choose. If it shows that you might be suited for medicine, I would consider trying it. You will not lose anything. You are young and everyone has a maze they have to travel to find an exit to your passion.

    I have a friend who traveled this path: Musician, Physics student(dropped out from PhD studies) and found his passion in computers when he was 32 year-old. Not he earns a great living, is happy and advice everyone to search, when you hit the wall, turn around and continue searching for your path. You might search for it a long time but eventually you will find your way.

    You need to think through loads of things. Prospects, interest, goals, talk with doctors if you can...I still encourage you to try medicine. If you find it hard and it does not catch your interest, drop out and re-apply where you think you want.

    Better to search than resign to the job you hate. Failing is essential and thus medicine might help you to start the search.

    BTW, in the university you will meet great deal of people who might offer you their insights, give you inspiration and...you know Take care.

    P.S. I don't know why I wrote so much. I guess because it calms me and reinforces my path through this life..
    thank you so much for your thorough response, it's given me a lot of things to think about, especially the personality test. at first i thought that the test wouldn't really lead me anywhere but i got a personality type which recommends journalism, psychologist, counsellor, public relations specialist, etc. these all seem to be careers i've been ridiculously drawn to over the past 6 months. i don't know which personality type would be for medicine, but that certainly hasn't come up as an option for me.. the profile seems to be very accurate, i really did agree with the entire profile i read. i won't base my decision on a personality test, but at least it's given me more to consider and really does confirm where my interests and strengths lie i think. again, thank you very much i enjoyed reading your story
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    I think I will probably get alot of hate for my opinion but here it goes...

    Personally, I would say go for it! not many people get the chance to do medicine and if you've got it, take it! and intercalated degree will help and will actually give you a degree that you could leave with if you didn't want to continue with medicine after the pre-clinical years.

    As people above have said a medical degree does require alot of work and time etc, however, if your getting A*s at a-level and are happy with the amount of work that you are doing, it is clear that you will be more than capable of getting the most out of a medical degree and honestly, its also alot of fun!

    And finally, (this is the bit people aren't going to like me for, but I think you should get an objective opinion...) at the end of the day, a medical degree is still a plain old degree. If you don't want to become a doctor at the end of it, you don't have to! Although it is known as a vocational degree you can still use it the same as a normal undergraduate degree or, in some places, an equivalent to a masters degree to do something completely different. So in effect, a medicine degree, whilst longer than other undergrad degrees, give you all the opportunities of a 'normal' degree plus any medical career that you want...

    Even within medicine there are lots of sub-niches that you can go into. You mentioned english and psychology as an interest, well, on the English side you could go into medical journalism or novel writing that has a medical theme. On the psychology side, psychiatry has a sub-specialty devoted to this and pigling made a valid point that it affects everyone.

    However, if you don't think that you could cope with 5/6 years of study of just the human body and science, then medicine probably isn't for you...

    Like almost all the people above have said, choose what interests you the most, as this is most likely the thing that will make you the happiest in the long run...
    Good luck with whichever decision you make
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    (Original post by SophRose1111)
    ...

    You sound like me! I too was very interested in Psychology and English when I was in sixth form and went through a phase where I considered applying for one of those subjects. I've now done 2 years of medicine and am currently in my third year, intercalating in Psychology. To my surprise, this year of studying and doing research in Psychology has been the year of medical school that I have enjoyed the least. I honestly cannot wait to get back to medicine now. I just wanted to tell you this so you can see that medicine does not necessarily close any doors off to you, in fact it can open a few more than you would expect.

    I would advise you to go for medicine and see how you feel. You may just be surprised.

    Best of luck.
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    I would wait for a while actually. Your decision to completely want to do Psychology etc could just be a phase just like you absolutely knew you wanted to do medicine before. I would give it a while, if your opinion doesn't change then decline the offers.
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    (Original post by Insanity514)
    I would wait for a while actually. Your decision to completely want to do Psychology etc could just be a phase just like you absolutely knew you wanted to do medicine before. I would give it a while, if your opinion doesn't change then decline the offers.
    So you think it is best to wait until deadline? Already, i've wanted to do english/psychology, for longer than i've wanted to do medicine. But i will wait
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    (Original post by SophRose1111)
    So you think it is best to wait until deadline? Already, i've wanted to do english/psychology, for longer than i've wanted to do medicine. But i will wait
    If it was me I would wait for the last minute to decline my offer just incase I suddenly wanted to go for medicine. I had a similar thought last year to reject my offer in favour of a gap year but then I decided against it.

    Make sure you leave enough time to apply to other universities through clearing or another process (I'm not too sure how it works though).

    But that's just what I would do if I was in your boat. I'm not telling you what to do, so if you really don't want to do medicine and your sure about it just do what feels right
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    (Original post by SophRose1111)
    So you think it is best to wait until deadline? Already, i've wanted to do english/psychology, for longer than i've wanted to do medicine. But i will wait
    Have a think, you sound like you're adiment on not doing medicine... do this trick.
    Flip a coin heads being medicine tails being what else you want to do, when it's in the air what do you want it to truely be?
    But from reading htis you sound like you'd rather do English/psychology, do what you want and not what other people expect of you. It takes a strong person to do that
    If you do english you can still get into medicine at a later point in life when you are ready to. I got into grad med without a science degree.
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    (Original post by SophRose1111)
    I am currently in upper sixth, and applied to do medicine this year. I currently have 2 offers to study medicine at East Anglia and at Imperial college. However, I am starting to have second thoughts about this. Throughout college I had never known what I wanted to do with my life and I still, to this date, would rather not decide. I did work experience over last summer and I realised the practice of medicine is truly inspiring and I felt as if I had some of the qualities which would suit me to this career. I read up on things, did more work experience, and I really did enjoy it. My main motivation being that I would help people. My application was frantic, I wrote my personal statement within a week of 'knowing' I wanted to do medicine, which is not even close to how long my fellow medics have known they wanted to do medicine. I simply did not have enough time to think, and I was hugely encouraged to apply.

    But since January I have been starting to have second thoughts, about the long training course, about the fact that it would hugely influence my lifestyle, about the fact that I have a strong interest in Psychology, and also English, and that I would be just as happy doing either of these degrees, if not more. I knew that these thoughts must have been brought about due to the stresses of applying to do medicine, so I shunned them off, but they kept recurring, and over the past month I have been regretting my frantic application more than anything.

    I have never been one for prestige, I feel that I would rather have happiness within myself, which I do know is brought with the rewarding nature of medicine, but from speaking to junior doctors I know that a lot of the time the stress and the pressure overrides the rewarding nature of the degree and career. I really enjoy change, and I really do not want to embark on a set career path from the age of 18. I would rather do a non-vocational degree which would allow me to decide what I want to do in a couple of years. I would love to do a degree which would give me a big variety of career opportunities, as I really do have interests in a range of different careers.

    PLEASE do not respond with a lecture on how people would do anything to secure a medicine place, I believe I worked just as hard as those people who have not got a place, I definitely wanted this at the time, I did not fake my interview and in reward I got these places. I do understand that it is hugely unfortunate that there are people who have been reapplying to do medicine for years now with no luck, I seriously, seriously do. I wish them the best of luck and hope they are rewarded for their efforts and ambitions.

    My question is, do you think I should withdraw my medical application, on the basis that I do not want it half as much as other people, would not make a good doctor as a result, and I would much more ENJOY the variety of career options a non-vocational degree offers?
    :juggle:Come to Imperial, wench! We will have an awesome time in this intellectual sweatshop :listen:

    No, but seriously, I can totally understand the position you're currently in as this is basically me few years back. In my case it also involved moving to foreign country. I've decided to lay the cards on the table and take the offer. To make the long story short: first few months were horrible - probably the worst time of my life if I'm being fair and honest. Right now I'm seeing the hard work paying back and I'm pretty sure it was one of the best decisions of my life.
 
 
 
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