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If there were a general election tomorrow... Watch

  • View Poll Results: Who would you vote for in a General Election tomorrow?
    Labour
    68
    37.57%
    Conservative
    55
    30.39%
    UKIP
    22
    12.15%
    Liberal Democrats
    9
    4.97%
    Green
    19
    10.50%
    BNP
    3
    1.66%
    English Democrats
    0
    0%
    Respect
    1
    0.55%
    Other
    4
    2.21%

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    (Original post by SpottedZebra)
    This is so weird - I was literally just thinking of starting a discussion on this when I found this thread!

    I would vote labour - although I don't much like Ed Miliband, I do agree with a lot of labour's policies. Unfortunately though I suspect it will be a Tory government again.

    My second choice would be Lib Dem.
    Labour have policies?
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    I have no idea,I would have in the past been for Lib Dem but all those lies etc put me out. Then maybe SNP but I really don't want an independent Scotland, however they made sure we still had our free prescriptions etc.

    In other words, I have no idea.
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    (Original post by LexiswasmyNexis)
    I think such considerations have their place in an electoral decision process.<br />
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    I vote for someone based on their policies not skin colour.
    Why do you think that?
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    Begrudgingly I'd vote tory. Labour are far too dangerous for me to vote a party without a chance of winning.
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    (Original post by alexh42)
    <br />
    <br />
    I vote for someone based on their policies not skin colour.
    Why do you think that?
    Do you vote for someone based on how their policies affect you or how the policies affect what you think is best for the country? Is it really possible to make a clean distinction?

    If the former, then it isn't too much of a stretch to decide to vote for someone who you think is culturally similar to you in the belief that they will think along a similar line to you. Ethnicity is an indicator of cultural background.

    This is a representative democracy- the people you vote for are supposed to represent your views. What is wrong with choosing someone who you think will best represent you along cultural lines?

    I'm not saying it should be an important consideration; I just object to someone saying you should discount it when democratically speaking it's a perfectly valid consideration to take into account when forming an opinion.


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    (Original post by Rob da Mop)
    I hate it but in all honesty I'm leaning towards the tories... I hate their health reforms and some of what they're doing to the education system, but either they're the only ones who seem to be taking steps to fix the economy or the others are lying...
    What a ridiculous statement.
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    I guess I'd reluctantly vote Labour, I don't really like any of the major parties. Green would be my second choice I guess.
    Hopefully the next generation of Labour will move further back to the left, then I'll happily vote for them.

    There should be a hippie party, I'd vote for that!
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    (Original post by Evie Ninnenbaum)
    I'm Jewish and my family comes from Poland just like Miliband. On top of that I'm left of centre. I'm looking forward to the Labour majority in 2015.
    Being left of center i'm curious as to why you support the parliamentary Labour Party who's voting record indicates that the spirit of New Labour (whether that's good or bad) is alive and well. Why for example do you view them as a better fit than the Greens or is this a tactical vote?

    (Original post by VonMiller)
    I don't quite get British politics and your version of the word 'liberal'. In Germany if you declare yourself a 'liberal' that means you support liberty meaning small government. It is usually an apolitical person as well, not left or right wing individual, just one who supports liberty: be it social or economic.

    In the UK liberal tends to be associated with left wing person in social affairs like pro civil liberties and individual rights - but those two can be championed by both: right and left so wtf? Economic liberal tends to be wrongly associated with Barack Obama, Clinton or JFK, whereas economic liberals were in reality Thatcher and Reagan etc.

    LibDems seem to be very central having all those species inside of their party ranging from leftists and statists to free-market people.

    Well I would probably vote for Labour or Green.
    That's down to our electoral system which does not favour small parties at all. If there were PR then we'd probably see both the Tories and Labour split in two with the more extreme elements of both leaving for Ukip and the Greens with the Lib Dems probably leaking membership to the new Tories and Labour.

    I'd have said that Clinton was an economic liberal and i think Obama is hard done by, he's not really moving the USA to the outright left, just closer to the center.
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    (Original post by Telecaster Steak)
    I guess I'd reluctantly vote Labour, I don't really like any of the major parties. Green would be my second choice I guess.
    Hopefully the next generation of Labour will move further back to the left, then I'll happily vote for them.

    There should be a hippie party, I'd vote for that!
    The Greens are the hippie Party, The SWP are the loony party.
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    Labour 2015.
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    Reluctantly, I'd vote Labour. The Greens don't field a candidate in my constituency; it's a Tory stronghold. Even the BNP have a local influence where I'm from.

    New Labour's (and I include Miliband in this bracket) inability to tear itself away from the fundamental neo-liberal lines of Thatcherism has become especially clear this week. If we had true democracy I'd vote Green, or maybe the NHA, but anything other than Labour is a wasted vote for me.


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    (Original post by LexiswasmyNexis)
    Do you vote for someone based on how their policies affect you or how the policies affect what you think is best for the country? Is it really possible to make a clean distinction?

    If the former, then it isn't too much of a stretch to decide to vote for someone who you think is culturally similar to you in the belief that they will think along a similar line to you. Ethnicity is an indicator of cultural background.

    This is a representative democracy- the people you vote for are supposed to represent your views. What is wrong with choosing someone who you think will best represent you along cultural lines?

    I'm not saying it should be an important consideration; I just object to someone saying you should discount it when democratically speaking it's a perfectly valid consideration to take into account when forming an opinion.


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    But if you look at America for instance, Obama has been deemed to have 'failed' African-Americans by not bringing about the miraculous turnaround in fortunes that people had (naively) hoped for.

    Also on principle, I think it's very wrong to suggest that a white man cannot accurately represent the views of a black man. I would trust my MP to represent my opinions exactly the same (very little) regardless of race, gender etc. Your MP is there to represent your views, not be you.
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    (Original post by thegodofgod)
    To be honest, all 3 of the major parties sound f****d. Although I imagine, like meenu89, that Labour will win outright in 2015.

    Right now I'm seriously regretting persuading my parents to vote Lib Dem in the last general election when their manifesto included the scrapping of university tuition fees :cry:

    I doubt I'll ever vote for them, and I seriously doubt they'll get in to leadership for the foreseeable future.
    I don't want to come across as being rude, but you cannot honestly have expected someone to completely scrap tuition fees, given how they started at £3000, then to £9,000, in the same Labour government which introduced them in the fall of 1998?

    Why would they get rid of them now?

    Clegg outright lied to the electorate, because Clegg has proved himself to be what he always was - an underdog with megalomania problems. He signed that deal deliberately knowing that that it was wrong and because he didn't know he would be in power.

    It was done to appeal to the student support base who backed him through the election. Much like IDS crass comments of being able to live on benefits, it was little more than a publicity stunt to get voters.

    Anybody in the right mind will never, ever vote the Lib Dems until Clegg has been evicted from office.
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    Has to be the Tories. Whilst they haven't made much progress in their quest to eliminate the deficit and eventually bring down the National Debt, they at least have it as a goal. Labour, no matter what they may say, love borrowing.

    To me, it seems fundamentally unethical for a generation to pay for its standard of living by saddling the next generation with debt. The more debt we have, the more of our taxes go on interest and the less money there is. The cuts that we face today are because of Labour's 13 years, not because of the Tories. Choosing Labour again is choosing another 5 years of delusion and willing denial, where we will go on living to a standard we feel we deserve but cannot afford, and the next generation will be poorer because of it.
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    (Original post by FinnianC)
    Reluctantly, I'd vote Labour. The Greens don't field a candidate in my constituency; it's a Tory stronghold. Even the BNP have a local influence where I'm from.

    New Labour's (and I include Miliband in this bracket) inability to tear itself away from the fundamental neo-liberal lines of Thatcherism has become especially clear this week. If we had true democracy I'd vote Green, or maybe the NHA, but anything other than Labour is a wasted vote for me.


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    Have you read the Green manifesto? It is full of mistakes and contradictions.
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    (Original post by Chad_Bronson)
    I don't want to come across as being rude, but you cannot honestly have expected someone to completely scrap tuition fees, given how they started at £3000, then to £9,000, in the same Labour government which introduced them in the fall of 1998?

    Why would they get rid of them now?

    Clegg outright lied to the electorate, because Clegg has proved himself to be what he always was - an underdog with megalomania problems. He signed that deal deliberately knowing that that it was wrong and because he didn't know he would be in power.

    It was done to appeal to the student support base who backed him through the election. Much like IDS crass comments of being able to live on benefits, it was little more than a publicity stunt to get voters.

    Anybody in the right mind will never, ever vote the Lib Dems until Clegg has been evicted from office.
    It was actually the Conservative government under John Major that commissioned the report in reviewing HE funding, and then in July 1998 Labour introduced the tuition fees capped at a maximum of £1000.

    It wasn't until January 2004 that tuition fees were raised to a maximum of £3000
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    (Original post by LexiswasmyNexis)
    Tbh I think I'd like this coalition again. The thought of the Blues in power alone frightens me, but the LDs have no chance.

    I quite like this tempered conservatism we have no.

    I'm not sure I could vote Labour again until the likes of the Eds were gone.


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    What don't you like about Miliband, out of interest?
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    (Original post by tc92)
    But if you look at America for instance, Obama has been deemed to have 'failed' African-Americans by not bringing about the miraculous turnaround in fortunes that people had (naively) hoped for.

    Also on principle, I think it's very wrong to suggest that a white man cannot accurately represent the views of a black man. I would trust my MP to represent my opinions exactly the same (very little) regardless of race, gender etc. Your MP is there to represent your views, not be you.
    None of what you say is a reason for actively ignoring ethnicity or culture.


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    (Original post by ApresAlkan)
    What don't you like about Miliband, out of interest?
    Too closely associated with Brown for my personal taste. Also, he is good at whining about stuff without presenting an alternative. I don't find him a credible statesman.


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    The Green party. I like their manifesto.
 
 
 
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