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    (Original post by la95)
    After much searching I managed to find her profile and she received three offers from what I can tell. I'd say if you manage to get a 2:1 or above in a degree, get plenty of work experience (and reflect well on what you learned in your PS of course!), get a good UKCAT/GAMSAT score and apply to Graduate Entry Medicine courses, you have as good a chance as anyone else. If you want it, go for it. That's my advice at least.
    Thank you very much you have helped a lot


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    (Original post by Brentton)
    Thank you very much you have helped a lot


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    No worries; I'm glad I could be of service. You might also find this useful: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...cine_-_a_guide
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    I've done a lot of research into this area lately because I am currently a first year student on a BSc Psychology degree and I'm looking to studying graduate entry medicine afterwards.

    My background briefly...

    3x B / 7x C in GCSEs

    BTEC National Diploma in Photography and Digital Imaging at grade Distinction, Distinction, Merit

    I've emailed A LOT of the universities who offer graduate entry medicine and whilst some like Liverpool or Imperial College London would like you to have done a specific type of degree, some do not. Kings College London, Warwick, Newcastle, Southampton, etc. Some universities will take graduates from any degrees (arts, etc) as long as you achieve a 2:1 or above. Some universities take those who have achieved 2:2 but these require you sit the GAMSAT and not just the UKCAT.

    I have a friend who did her first undergraduate degree in fine art at Kingston Uni and she is now in her first year at St Georges doing graduate medicine. She was unsuccessful in her first year of applying, however she then went on to work as an opthalmology assistant for a year and was successful in her second attempt!

    I've also asked admissions at the universities I am looking to apply to about my lack of high GCSE grades and complete lack of A levels. Again, for some it's a problem and others it's not. Most graduate entry medicine courses do not take GCSE grades into consideration and will only require specific a levels for example "A level chemistry at grade B or above". I will be taking an evening AS level in Chemistry during my 2nd year of my psychology degree just because it will allow me to apply to two universities (Southampton and Barts) where I really love the look of the course and uni.

    You can get funding for a second degree in medicine although you have to pay the first 3.5 thousand pounds in your first year of study. Each year afterwards, that portion will be paid by the NHS.

    Having spoken to admissions tutors and people currently on grad med degrees, I think the main thing is to have a good degree classification and plenty of work experience or voluntary work under your belt. Anything related to medicine or even working with people, charities, etc. Oh and of course excellent UKCAT and/or GAMSAT scores will help you a lot!

    Ramble over... it IS possible but it'll take a lot of time and effort. Of course if it's something you really want to do (like me!) hopefully it'll all pay off. Good luck with your studies.
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    (Original post by kirstieviolet)
    I've done a lot of research into this area lately because I am currently a first year student on a BSc Psychology degree and I'm looking to studying graduate entry medicine afterwards.

    My background briefly...

    3x B / 7x C in GCSEs

    BTEC National Diploma in Photography and Digital Imaging at grade Distinction, Distinction, Merit

    I've emailed A LOT of the universities who offer graduate entry medicine and whilst some like Liverpool or Imperial College London would like you to have done a specific type of degree, some do not. Kings College London, Warwick, Newcastle, Southampton, etc. Some universities will take graduates from any degrees (arts, etc) as long as you achieve a 2:1 or above. Some universities take those who have achieved 2:2 but these require you sit the GAMSAT and not just the UKCAT.

    I have a friend who did her first undergraduate degree in fine art at Kingston Uni and she is now in her first year at St Georges doing graduate medicine. She was unsuccessful in her first year of applying, however she then went on to work as an opthalmology assistant for a year and was successful in her second attempt!

    I've also asked admissions at the universities I am looking to apply to about my lack of high GCSE grades and complete lack of A levels. Again, for some it's a problem and others it's not. Most graduate entry medicine courses do not take GCSE grades into consideration and will only require specific a levels for example "A level chemistry at grade B or above". I will be taking an evening AS level in Chemistry during my 2nd year of my psychology degree just because it will allow me to apply to two universities (Southampton and Barts) where I really love the look of the course and uni.

    You can get funding for a second degree in medicine although you have to pay the first 3.5 thousand pounds in your first year of study. Each year afterwards, that portion will be paid by the NHS.

    Having spoken to admissions tutors and people currently on grad med degrees, I think the main thing is to have a good degree classification and plenty of work experience or voluntary work under your belt. Anything related to medicine or even working with people, charities, etc. Oh and of course excellent UKCAT and/or GAMSAT scores will help you a lot!

    Ramble over... it IS possible but it'll take a lot of time and effort. Of course if it's something you really want to do (like me!) hopefully it'll all pay off. Good luck with your studies.
    I have actually sat down with my mum and shown her this post, and it was the most suitable thing to do. My main concern is that, with all my degree work, would I manage a levels on top?

    Other than that I am very grateful for your post ! Thank you and I hope you achieve your dreams


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    I have the same concern about A levels. I think an AS level during the first year or university would be doable. Not easy, but doable. I'd advise you to look into entry requirements of specific universities grad med programmes and see if the ones you'd like to apply to require any A levels and if so what are they. This can depend on the degree you go onto studying (for example, I am only required to have an AS in chemistry for barts and the london because I do a degree in psychology. If however, most of the universities you like the look of require no a levels and for you to sit the GAMSAT. It would be better for you to spend your time revising for that rather than also sitting a levels. I recommend reading the book "Graduate Entry Medicine" by Graham Blackman and Matt Green. (available on Amazon). It gives a good insight into entry requirements, admission tests and also what the different universities campuses and course content are like. This has been VERY helpful in helping me decide where to apply and therefore what to do in terms of entry requirements. Hope this makes sense. In summary... you might not even necessarily need a levels so try not to worry too much it's all down to where you wish to apply and what you think you can do.
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    (Original post by kirstieviolet)
    I have the same concern about A levels. I think an AS level during the first year or university would be doable. Not easy, but doable. I'd advise you to look into entry requirements of specific universities grad med programmes and see if the ones you'd like to apply to require any A levels and if so what are they. This can depend on the degree you go onto studying (for example, I am only required to have an AS in chemistry for barts and the london because I do a degree in psychology. If however, most of the universities you like the look of require no a levels and for you to sit the GAMSAT. It would be better for you to spend your time revising for that rather than also sitting a levels. I recommend reading the book "Graduate Entry Medicine" by Graham Blackman and Matt Green. (available on Amazon). It gives a good insight into entry requirements, admission tests and also what the different universities campuses and course content are like. This has been VERY helpful in helping me decide where to apply and therefore what to do in terms of entry requirements. Hope this makes sense. In summary... you might not even necessarily need a levels so try not to worry too much it's all down to where you wish to apply and what you think you can do.
    Oh ok I'm going to order that book now and have a look to help make decisions! Many thanks


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