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    I detest codeacademy.com because it does not teach you how to think. I prefer a hard problem, google the hell out of the Web and try to hammer out the solution.
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    (Original post by Sketch)
    TheNewBoston On youtube is incredibly helpful.
    He's okay, but it's mostly his quirkiness that kept me watching. It's much better to get into the habit of reading imo. It takes a lot to get published, not so much to make a YouTube video.
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    Any pointers?

    Stack trace pointers. Ba dum tsh.

    Anyone?

    no

    (Original post by reneetaylor)
    I'm really interested in learning the basics of programming, any pointers about where to start from your personal experience?
    Or any advice about programming at all would be helpful!

    Like how hard is it to learn, etc.

    Thanks!
    Just realised you were a girl.. Girls who can program = my dream wife :P

    If you wanna learn Java, I can always help you
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    (Original post by CodeJack)
    Any pointers?

    Stack trace pointers. Ba dum tsh.

    Anyone?

    no



    Just realised you were a girl.. Girls who can program = my dream wife :P

    If you wanna learn Java, I can always help you
    Hahahaha!

    Yeah, I'm surprised not much people are interested in it to be honest, it's really interesting.

    So far I'm finding it so awesome, almost addictive, it really improves your sense of logic also.

    And thanks for your support!
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    (Original post by reneetaylor)
    Hahahaha!

    Yeah, I'm surprised not much people are interested in it to be honest, it's really interesting.

    So far I'm finding it so awesome, almost addictive, it really improves your sense of logic also.

    And thanks for your support!
    Which language are you learning?
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    (Original post by reneetaylor)
    Hahahaha!

    Yeah, I'm surprised not much people are interested in it to be honest, it's really interesting.

    So far I'm finding it so awesome, almost addictive, it really improves your sense of logic also.

    And thanks for your support!
    Most of my friends take ICT, sometimes they're on about they're work rambling on about networks, programming etc etc.
    Most of the time I zone out but maybe they're doing extra work outside of school (I don't think programming is on the course at AS) I can ask if you want.

    And high five! with the meme pp :L
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    (Original post by CodeJack)
    Which language are you learning?
    At the moment I'm learning Java Script!
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    (Original post by R1C3W1N3)
    Most of my friends take ICT, sometimes they're on about they're work rambling on about networks, programming etc etc.
    Most of the time I zone out but maybe they're doing extra work outside of school (I don't think programming is on the course at AS) I can ask if you want.

    And high five! with the meme pp :L
    Haha, wow thanks, and it's absolutely fine! I've got a general idea of the basics now that I've spent a good 3 hours on it, but thanks a lot!

    Double hi5!
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    So far i have tried to learn C, Java and Python and written some quite useful applications. Python is by far the easiest to learn and is used by Google to quickly test and develop idea stage applications. However Python tends to be much more slow than C because C is a low level language(Closer to the code your CPU run).
    You have to consider what you want to achieve, if you want to program small applications to run on a normal computer, and learn to think like an software engineer, Python would be ideal because it is very easy to learn. Do you want to do some number crunching where speed is key, then C would be your first choice.
    My experience with Java is very limited because the learning curve is quite steep.

    Here is a link to a internal Google python class which i found extremely usefull while learning Python:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tKTZoB2Vjuk

    Try have a look at that video, it shows how incredibly easy and intuitive Python is, you'll be up and running in no time!

    But if you want to have a go at C, i would recommend this http://www.cprogramming.com/tutorial/c-tutorial.html, knowledge of C is never a bad thing especially when learning new languages(Alot of the main programming languages looks like C), however if you want quick results i would recommend Python.
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    I have read lots on Class Modules, methods and properties, why you would use them and when.

    However, something in my head still prevents me from thinking in that fashion when confronted with a new piece of coding.

    My latest attempt at trying to understand it is to compare two pieces of code, one using CMs and one without.

    Can anyone please provide me of some examples?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by I'veGotAHadron)
    What is Python like?
    Easy syntax, with clear rules- so it won't be a nightmare to read someone's else code (or even yours after few years), good standard library, nice support from 3rd party vendors, bindings to Qt and GTK (among others)- in overall really nice lingo.
    And if you use JIT compilers with it, it can be pretty fast too- not as fast as assembler or C, but quite close (depends from program).
    Also, I'd forget Pi- its overrated piece of crap. Programming on real computers is much better, scripting everyday jobs is useful... especially on unix and unix-like systems.
    There is even book about using python for administration- you can easily find it's torrent.
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    (Original post by Valentas)
    I detest codeacademy.com because it does not teach you how to think. I prefer a hard problem, google the hell out of the Web and try to hammer out the solution.
    No one can teach you how to think.
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    (Original post by Valentas)
    Yes, programming is an art. You have to do it, do it a lot in order to become better. Also I advise you strongly HERE! Stop reading books, and DO PROGRAMMING!! Write code, bad code, ****ty and buggy code it does not matter. Write code :}

    EDIT: Visit StackOverflow and other great programmers websites and they will emphasize writing code, a lot of it. Decide on an interesting project and persevere until you complete it. You will learn a lot along the way.

    Also stop negging me for the most fundamental truth every budding programmer must understand and do. :}
    +1
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    Try going on code academy or something similar


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    (Original post by Mr_PC)
    Java is high level. C is low level. Don't confuse wonderful C with dumb languages like Java please.
    No, C is also a high-level language. It does however have a number of low-level featues.
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    +1
    I disagree. You can learn a lot from a good book, and possibly write far better programs than if you just rely on stuff that you have read on the Internet. The problem is choosing a good book. There are far too many bad books around.
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    (Original post by tonyhawken)
    I disagree. You can learn a lot from a good book, and possibly write far better programs than if you just rely on stuff that you have read on the Internet. The problem is choosing a good book. There are far too many bad books around.
    I disagree. Books teach you syntax. As any programmer can tell you, writing applications requires more than just knowing the syntax. It requies that thing a book cannot teach you: intuition about writing programs.
 
 
 
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