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    (Original post by MrHappy_J)
    why would I want to do that even if I could?
    To do a different degree (or maybe Psychology somewhere else where the course is slightly different) so you can go on to do a Masters/Diploma in Counselling. If that is what you'd like to do, which it seems to be from your posts. If not, continue with whatever you're doing (complaining constantly, from what I can see).
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    (Original post by FuLLuPMepOrtION)
    obviously, it's probably very difficult and i respect that, but why would anyone want to spend £27,000 for a direct entry into the largest graduate unemployment market?
    Hehe I like you
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    (Original post by Ronove)
    To do a different degree (or maybe Psychology somewhere else where the course is slightly different) so you can go on to do a Masters/Diploma in Counselling. If that is what you'd like to do, which it seems to be from your posts. If not, continue with whatever you're doing (complaining constantly, from what I can see).
    I wanted to go into psychotherapy when I was a fresher, but I kind of gave up on that. Obviously.
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    I agree, most of the people who do a Psychology degree won't ever end up in the field of their degree. However, it certainly depends how much you make of your degree. I'm still a fresher, yet I've got a job working in the NHS as a Mental Health Act Manager; I represent my university as a BPS representative; I have spent hours shadowing in an MRI research lab; I've been funded to travel to a research conference by the uni.

    Having a degree is no longer enough for a job, people need to make the most of the opportunities they have at uni!
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    Perhaps some do it not as a route into graduate employment, but purely because they enjoy it? Ever thought of that?
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    (Original post by Anoth3rhobo)
    I agree, most of the people who do a Psychology degree won't ever end up in the field of their degree. However, it certainly depends how much you make of your degree. I'm still a fresher, yet I've got a job working in the NHS as a Mental Health Act Manager; I represent my university as a BPS representative; I have spent hours shadowing in an MRI research lab; I've been funded to travel to a research conference by the uni.

    Having a degree is no longer enough for a job, people need to make the most of the opportunities they have at uni!
    you have all that and you're a fresher?! :eek:
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    (Original post by *Interrobang*)
    Not all psychology graduates want to become psychologists. Many graduate schemes don't specify a particular degree subject, only the grade. Psychology degrees can give you lots of transferable skills: it's one of the few that does both essay writing and statistics. You do need to do a psychology degree (or conversion course) if you want to be a practising psychologist. Also of course, some people do it cos they find it interesting
    Each person is entitled to their opinion about Psychology. Lots of people think it's hard, boring, leads to no career etc.

    Personally, the subject fascinates me. I am curious to know why some people experience extreme highs or lows, can act violently, end up with some form of mental disorder etc. I want to be able to help people who have these disorders because everyone deserves to live their lives the way they want to for as long as they can.

    Psychology can be applied to anything, marketing, IT, Police work... the list is endless. I have chose the Clinical Psychology route because want to be able to help people who have these mental disorders because everyone deserves to live their lives the way they want to for as long as they can, and if I can contribute to, for example; helping an elderly man with Alzheimer's remember who he is and his family members for as long as possible then getting myself into nearly £30,000 worth of debt is well worth it!
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    (Original post by MrHappy_J)
    you have all that and you're a fresher?! :eek:
    I have. Like I said, in my opinion, it's not the subject of the degree that makes a difference, it's the experiences gained. It's the same with a job. If you go into a job and do the same meaningless task you will only gain little experience. If you go and do different tasks (eg. Note taking, web building, etc) you're a lot more desirable.


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    (Original post by Anoth3rhobo)
    I have. Like I said, in my opinion, it's not the subject of the degree that makes a difference, it's the experiences gained. It's the same with a job. If you go into a job and do the same meaningless task you will only gain little experience. If you go and do different tasks (eg. Note taking, web building, etc) you're a lot more desirable.


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    Fast lot of good it would do me, i dropped out of uni so i dont have those prospects. Youre probably a top student and very bright, thats why they chose you for those things. I got 2:2s at best, a third in stats.
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    The first year, level 4, of a psychology degree covers ALL the main branches of psychology and makes sure that your academic skills are developed to degree level. Yes, it may seem very mundane/boring but it is to prepare you for level 5 and 6. That is when you will start to specialize and begin to conduct your own research.
    If you want to 'study the mind', you have to learn about the 'tools of the trade' and how to utilise them. You can't just get a hacksaw and spoon and turn into Hannibal.
    I have just completed my first year. I'm a mature student doing Counselling Skills with Psychology. Next year I chosen Psychological Therapies because that ties in nicely to my main passion which is counselling. After my degree, I hope to go on and do a Masters in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy or Clinical Counselling (both are available at the Uni I'm already at).
    The thing with psychology is, it IS quite a leap of faith and many people aren't aware of how academic it is (including me). But if you are at a good Uni, you will get the support you need as well as good advice on careers options. I'd also suggest anyone who is tempted to do a psychology degree to look into the different areas of psychology. For example, if you want to 'study the mind', you have to be more specific; do you mean you want to look at the different parts of the brain (Neuroscience/biological psychology)? Or do you mean you want to try and work out how our brain processes information (cognitive psychology).
    Mental health isn't really psychology. It ties into psychology though and there are specific areas of psychology that are very beneficial for studying mental health. The main thing with studying mental health is, it takes a LOT of training. And if you want to actually start helping people with mental health issues, that is even more specialised. There are all kinds of ethical and legal considerations and implications that need to be studied in addition to your psyhological (and any other subject) training.
    Anyone who is considering doing a psychology degree, I would say go for it, but understand that the first year is tough and the work is non-stop (ESPECIALLY if you do it as a combined course). However, as others have said, you will gain TONS of transferrable skills. Psychology. As for jobs (this is copy and pasted, because I'm lazy heh):

    Jobs directly related to your degree:

    Clinical psychologist
    Educational psychologist
    Further education lecturer or higher education lecturer
    Occupational psychologist
    Sport and exercise psychologist

    Jobs where your degree would be useful:

    Psychotherapist
    Counsellor
    Careers adviser/personal adviser
    Human resources officer
    Retail manager
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    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2358399
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    (Original post by Anoth3rhobo)
    Having a degree is no longer enough for a job, people need to make the most of the opportunities they have at uni!
    This!
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    (Original post by lazuliblue)
    physiology is different to psychology....
    loooooooooool
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    im going into psychology

    i want to because each time something psychological comes on tv, i am interested and remember the information

    when someone tries to warn me against it, their negativity is my positive - for example someone told me the course at the firm uni is based on brain studies etc... well i love learning bout how the brain works!

    because i want to be a developmental psychologist (hopefully). i want to help people who develop a disorder through their childhood and help them 'recover' (if thats possible)

    because people say its different to a level... thats another plus. i am finding psychology a level just about reading the stuff and writing it down, whereas the course content at my firm uni have topics i actually WANT to learn

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    (Original post by WeirdLittleO)
    I'm in my third year of a psychology degree, a part of me regrets choosing it and another part of me is glad I chose it.

    Before I went to uni I was undecided between nursing and going into counselling and becoming a clinical psychologist. I was pretty much set up for nursing but I was really enjoying psychology a-level and I got caught up in it. I figured if I applied for a psychology degree it would keep my options open with it having so many branches and academic prospects, whereas nursing meant I could only be a nurse.
    So, off I went and three years later here I am. About to finish a psychology degree. Funnily enough, I'm in the process of getting a place onto a nursing course as the desire to be a nurse has prevailed. Without my degree I wouldn't have even been considered for an interview as I got below the standards for a level grades. It's a relevant degree as well, even though I'm not going for mental health branch. Some apply with English degrees and the like.
    I've really enjoyed my course though and had a great 3 years despite not choosing nursing in the first place (it was easier to get onto back then than it is now).
    Psychology can open many doors so long as It's bps accredited, people who are passionate go on to study a masters+PhD which lands you in a really good job ranging from clinical psychologist to educational psychologist.
    Many people take this degree out of interest and/or assume It's an easy route into becoming a psychologist, but it isn't. It requires hard work and dedication to reach that level. Places for PhDs are competitive.
    The course also has many transferable skills that can be applied to a lot of jobs, which helped with my nursing application.
    Kinda gone off topic but I just wanted to say my own reasons for studying psychology. It isn't as pointless as it seems.

    (Please excuse any incoherence, I've had a crappy day)

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    what made you change your mind about doing nursing instead of counselling? As I am looking at nursing and also psychology to become a psychotherapist however I am struggling with which to go for!
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    This is hilarious, OP. I love it.
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    (Original post by MrHappy_J)
    Fast lot of good it would do me, i dropped out of uni so i dont have those prospects. Youre probably a top student and very bright, thats why they chose you for those things. I got 2:2s at best, a third in stats.
    I've only just read this, so apologies for the late reply. However, I share the belief that uni isn't for everybody - a close friend of mine didn't go to college, let alone uni. I think people find their own path, which, quite rightly, isn't always academic. I'm sure you'll find something you enjoy regardless!
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    (Original post by salmon92)
    what made you change your mind about doing nursing instead of counselling? As I am looking at nursing and also psychology to become a psychotherapist however I am struggling with which to go for!
    I don't know really. I've always wanted to be a nurse for as long as I can remember, but also had an interest in psychology/mental health/counselling. People find me quite easy to talk to about things, private or otherwise, and some said they could see me as a counsellor. I can listen to people and give advice with discretion and whatever, but I just can't see myself doing it professionally lol. Nurses do some degree of counselling and comforting of patients so I guess it's the best of both worlds.
    I do adult nursing but if you did mental health nursing maybe you'd enjoy that.
    Psychology is hard to get onto, often takes 6-7+ years to qualify but it's worth it if it's really what you want to do.
    Feel free to PM me if you have any questions about either courses
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    Largest graudate employment market....


    I didn't not need to read that when struggling through my essay.

    But hey, I only pay £9,000 for it And plus, I'm doing a postgraduate after this, hopefully, so there's a few more years yet to worry about employment.
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    I'd like to know where the OP got their statistics from because 90% of psychology students at my university were employed within the first year of graduating.
 
 
 
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