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    (Original post by Runninground)
    I know how you feel. My nan (Yes, Nan) bought a Galaxy S3 mini. It was on contract and she used the majority of her minutes phoning me asking how to use it.

    She has had it a good few months and just about knows how to phone, use the camera, text and play bingo on it.
    At least she has the most important thing figured out
    Whats worse with my mum is that she had an iPhone 4s and a 4 before she upgraded. Whenever I see her on the phone, squinting and jabbing at it, I smh. So much technology going to waste. Its the same with her iPad, all she does is play solitaire
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    (Original post by heirloom)
    At least she has the most important thing figured out
    Whats worse with my mum is that she had an iPhone 4s and a 4 before she upgraded. Whenever I see her on the phone, squinting and jabbing at it, I smh. So much technology going to waste. Its the same with her iPad, all she does is play solitaire
    Haha, I know what you mean. It's so difficult to explain that they just have to touch it, not prod or jab it. There's so much on them that I don't think they can ever learn to use it all. My Nan didn't even know what Google was, or what an 'App' was (you forget that all this stuff that is second nature to us is completely new to them!)
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    So far as I can see the only reason to have a smartphone is because it's on contract. It only needs to last until the next upgrade, and contracts are a good idea, much cheaper, if you can accurately determine your usage. It is the contract business model which has allowed the rise of smartphones. However the contract business model can surely only last as long as phones continue to be a prestige symbol and a primary method of communication. That's why it was so essential for smartphones to be developed, because instant messaging and portable "desktop replacement" laptops encroached on the portable sphere to some degree and therefore drove down the effective price of each communicative exchange.
    I have no idea what you just said.
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    (Original post by Isambard Kingdom Brunel)
    I have no idea what you just said.
    1. Phone contracts became widespread in the early to mid 2000s due to falling costs.
    2. The contract model meant you got your phone replaced every year or two years.
    3. So phones then only needed to last 1-2 years, allowing less focus on battery life cycle and durable hardware.
    4. This allowed more to be spent on fancy features.
    5. However the contract business model was under threat from the increase in social networking on computers that were also becoming ever more easily portable. Messaging on these services was much cheaper than a phone contract.
    6. Therefore the fancy features that arose were those which allowed phones to become more like computers, i.e. smartphones.

    That's what I reckon anyway
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    (Original post by ss_s95)
    More technology, more things to go wrong my gran's 15 year old Nokia 6310i still works like a dream haha

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    The 6310i is perhaps the best none smartphone going, suffuciently modern to have good bluetooth and IR ,long battery life( up to a week standby in reasonable signal areas) CARK91 compatible...

    Posted from TSR Mobile
 
 
 
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