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Minimum Alcohol Pricing - Is it Ethical? Watch

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    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    I haven't actually read up much on this, does it apply to ordering online? E.g. Amazon UK.
    I believe so for British sites, though beyond that it's a bit of a grey area. Import duties levied and shipping are likely to make it effectively that however.
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    It's a heavily regressive policy, but extra government revenue is a nice thing, so I'm a bit split.
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    (Original post by Cattty)
    do you ever even go out at night?
    im guessing you stay safely in your house, peeping out from behind the curtains, scared the angry drunks will get you lol.

    ive been going out loads for years, ive seen a handful of fights, not serious. ive never been attacked and neither has anyone i know. your more likely to get attacked if your an angry drunk yourself and causing trouble.

    not everyone who drinks attacks people, the majority of people who go out and get drunk, have fun.

    i dont want them to change the pricing, cheap ALDI malibu, vodka and ameretto, etc are great for student parties.

    if people want to drink, thats their choice. its just discriminating against the poor. people wont be deterred by this.
    people who have real drinking problems will just have to spend more of their children's food money in order to buy alcohol- is that the solution?
    There's not much I can add to Matt's response to this, except to suggest you stay outside a hospital A&E on Friday night and another weekday night to see how many extra incidents happen and how many have alcohol as a major contributing factor. Alcohol causes crime, and the more difficult it is to buy the less crime there will be. Bear in mind that this isn't a ban, just financial pressure.
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    (Original post by Matt85259)
    While clearly an irrelevant comment, I'm guessing you've had the pleasure of living in nice areas the most of your life. This is indeed how a number of people, particularly elderly and other vulnerable people feel in certain areas. While alcohol is not the only cause, it certainly has an attributable affect.

    no im from manchester, so no i havent lived in a nice area all my life. people can feel intimidated in areas without alcohol being involved- gangs for example. putting the price up wont make any difference here.
    I've never witnessed a mugging and I've walked the streets for years - they still happen. Regardless, it's not even simply fights, but trips and falls; drink driving related collisions; alcohol poisoning and many other incidents that create a drain on the NHS and other services.

    people can fall, crash their car, OD on prescription drugs- should we set a minimum price for them too, just because of a small minority?
    Virtually an advert for the efficacy of a minimum price scheme. You don't want it increased because it means it'd be expensive for students to get drunk beyond sense and reason and hence they simply wouldn't do it. Mission accomplished.

    no, we would still do it, but may have to take a bigger loan or overdraft and we would most likely have a generation of young people heavily in debt.
    Yes, it is their choice and still will be - it's minimum pricing not prohibition. As for the last bit, I've addressed previously why the bleating of discrimination is a nonsense. People who have real drink problems are more likely to take steps to save themselves when faced up with a harsh reality of their problems. Cheap alcohol just acts a pacifier and lets them avoid their problems much longer.
    people with real drink problems arnt going to stop doing it just cos it costs a bit more.
    the tax on **** has gone up considerably over the last few years- have people stopped smoking? no

    btw in countries where alcohol is expensive, it does not deter people from getting drunk. Ireland is a good example- expensive drinks, but still famous for its drinking culture, people there will still get drunk, but have to pay more
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    (Original post by Hopple)
    There's not much I can add to Matt's response to this, except to suggest you stay outside a hospital A&E on Friday night and another weekday night to see how many extra incidents happen and how many have alcohol as a major contributing factor. Alcohol causes crime, and the more difficult it is to buy the less crime there will be. Bear in mind that this isn't a ban, just financial pressure.
    it wont make a difference, the tax on tobacco has gone up considerably over the last few years. have people stopped smoking because of it? no.

    people will still get drunk, theyl just pay more- it would be a completely pointless waste of time
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    It won't work. It'll just bring in more tax.
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    (Original post by Cattty)
    it wont make a difference, the tax on tobacco has gone up considerably over the last few years. have people stopped smoking because of it? no.

    people will still get drunk, theyl just pay more- it would be a completely pointless waste of time
    Indeed, I think it should go further. However, it will have an impact. Do you really believe that a minimum price of £10 per unit wouldn't decrease the amount of alcohol people drink? Of course, a tariff that high is prohibitive so will drive people to illegal/homebrewed alcohol, but that would still mean people drink less as it's harder to get hold of. 45p is a tentative step, testing the water, and even if it isn't enough to reduce crime overnight, the increase in price will push more people away from it in the long term.

    As for tobacco, there's been a very clear decrease in the number of smokers over time, and whilst I would also credit old smokers dying, more help to quit and youngsters being educated better, the price increase will have helped in the same way that any product will sell less if it is priced higher.
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    (Original post by Cattty)
    it wont make a difference, the tax on tobacco has gone up considerably over the last few years. have people stopped smoking because of it? no.

    people will still get drunk, theyl just pay more- it would be a completely pointless waste of time
    Nicotine addiction is far worse than an alcohol addiction. Most people who take up smoking will become addicted, the same cannot be said for alcohol. Equally, if cigarettes were sold for the price of a can of supermarket lager, how many more would be sold?

    As for your other points:

    1. As I said in my post, while it's not the only factor, alcohol can certainly contribute in these areas

    2. Technically there is a minimum price for prescription drugs. The cost of a prescription. Either way your point is flawed as firstly the drugs are there to reduce or reverse morbidity and second, the fact is people just don't anywhere nearly as often.

    3. If that's the case I despair for our future, though regardless I'd love you to direct me to where the banks are giving out these loans and overdrafts.

    4. Ireland also is considering a minimum price per unit for its alcohol to eliminate the cheap stuff being sold in supermarkets. It's very much like Britain in that respect. A high cost in a pub does not mean you can't buy cheap. I'd also invite you to look at nations where minimum pricing has been put in place to great effect.
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    (Original post by Matt85259)
    Nicotine addiction is far worse than an alcohol addiction. Most people who take up smoking will become addicted, the same cannot be said for alcohol. Equally, if cigarettes were sold for the price of a can of supermarket lager, how many more would be sold?

    As for your other points:

    1. As I said in my post, while it's not the only factor, alcohol can certainly contribute in these areas

    2. Technically there is a minimum price for prescription drugs. The cost of a prescription. Either way your point is flawed as firstly the drugs are there to reduce or reverse morbidity and second, the fact is people just don't anywhere nearly as often.

    3. If that's the case I despair for our future, though regardless I'd love you to direct me to where the banks are giving out these loans and overdrafts.

    4. Ireland also is considering a minimum price per unit for its alcohol to eliminate the cheap stuff being sold in supermarkets. It's very much like Britain in that respect. A high cost in a pub does not mean you can't buy cheap. I'd also invite you to look at nations where minimum pricing has been put in place to great effect.
    nicotine is more addictive than alcohol, however alcoholism is far more dangerous than nicotine. people who are full blown alcoholics are advised not to quit without medical assistance as the withdrawal can kill you. whereas nicotine may be difficult to give up, but the withdrawal is not dangerous in the same way alcohol withdrawal is
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    (Original post by Cattty)
    nicotine is more addictive than alcohol, however alcoholism is far more dangerous than nicotine. people who are full blown alcoholics are advised not to quit without medical assistance as the withdrawal can kill you. whereas nicotine may be difficult to give up, but the withdrawal is not dangerous in the same way alcohol withdrawal is
    That's all the more reason to limit the chances of alcoholism by attempting to reduce binge drinking, no? As posted previously, cutting the supply of cheap fuel can push them quicker into medical intervention and get them the help they need. The drink will kill them as surely as any withdrawal symptoms.
 
 
 
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