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    (Original post by Runninground)
    I'm doing the accounts prep for Sole traders/limited companies, along with the tax returns & tax comps. I found that the first job I did I was like 'Right i'm going to check all of these figures twice and check the formulas and get someone else to check it for me to make sure it's right, because if I get it wrong it will be difficult to find the error' but then you realise that if the bank balances then you've probably got it right, so you don't have to check it over and over.

    I like it when I open up a spreadsheet and manage to work out where all the figures come from so I can do this years one correctly. (It's also very exciting when you've just spent most of the day analysing the bank payments and receipts and the bank actually balances )

    I also get a bit confused over the accruals and prepayments. I find it easier to write out the months and actually count it. If I can find when the payment was made and how much it was, then I can count how many months were prepaid then multiply the cost by the number of prepaid months divided by 12 (:lolwut:). If I can't find the payment then I get stuck.

    What i'm wondering is if I will be doing accounts prep all the time whilst being a student? I'm getting the hang of it now so I reckon in a month or so i'll be able to do them without needing much help. Unless they are giving me the easy jobs, I think it would get a bit boring doing it over and over again?
    Haha, I guess that's what speeds up the process huh? I'm getting the hang of the processes that have been shown to me, so I'll gradually work on my speed.

    A lot of the things I've been asked to do so far (and maybe the ones you've had yourself) I would say are the 'routine' part of the job, and you'll be involved with other things too. I presume there will also be regular opportunities to speak with clients and/or budget holders, and do like the analytical part of the job.

    Not so much as a briefing as a quick mention, but one of my colleagues spoke to me today and informed me that I'll be involved in an ongoing project very soon. He gave me a copy of the business case just before I left, and, from what I've read so far it looks very interesting as it's on a planned major IT infrastructure change. What exactly my involvement would be here, I don't know yet, but I'm excited

    I guess we shall see how things pan out in the next few months huh? But do carry on posting your own experiences every now and then, as I will do so myself
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    (Original post by sonic_dream)
    Haha, I guess that's what speeds up the process huh? I'm getting the hang of the processes that have been shown to me, so I'll gradually work on my speed.

    A lot of the things I've been asked to do so far (and maybe the ones you've had yourself) I would say are the 'routine' part of the job, and you'll be involved with other things too. I presume there will also be regular opportunities to speak with clients and/or budget holders, and do like the analytical part of the job.

    Not so much as a briefing as a quick mention, but one of my colleagues spoke to me today and informed me that I'll be involved in an ongoing project very soon. He gave me a copy of the business case just before I left, and, from what I've read so far it looks very interesting as it's on a planned major IT infrastructure change. What exactly my involvement would be here, I don't know yet, but I'm excited

    I guess we shall see how things pan out in the next few months huh? But do carry on posting your own experiences every now and then, as I will do so myself
    Sounds good! I hate it when you've done a job and you feel like it went well, but then you get the next job and it's so hard Out of the jobs i've had so far, only a few of them have been easy- the rest are pretty difficult because the client can't use Sage or record in their books properly -_-

    On thing I get stuck on is which accounts should be debited and which should be credited. The journal posting in my jobs consist of 'Reclassifying Motor expense DR XXX £100, CR ZZZ £100' Next line... 'Correcting Debit/Credit DR ZZZ £200 CR XXX £200' aha. (If that makes any sense to you, we must be doing the same sort of job )
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    (Original post by Runninground)
    Sounds good! I hate it when you've done a job and you feel like it went well, but then you get the next job and it's so hard Out of the jobs i've had so far, only a few of them have been easy- the rest are pretty difficult because the client can't use Sage or record in their books properly -_-

    On thing I get stuck on is which accounts should be debited and which should be credited. The journal posting in my jobs consist of 'Reclassifying Motor expense DR XXX £100, CR ZZZ £100' Next line... 'Correcting Debit/Credit DR ZZZ £200 CR XXX £200' aha. (If that makes any sense to you, we must be doing the same sort of job )
    DEAD CLIC

    Debit Expenses Assets Dividends
    Credit Liabilities Income Capital

    And do the opposite to reverse them.
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    When I was applying for jobs, I was very adamant that I wanted to qualify through the ACCA. My head's still saying that's what I should do, although the general opinion is that either of the big qualifications (you know what I mean) are good enough to further you in this career.

    (Recently at least) Through my experience with work, however, I seem to be enjoying the management accountancy side of things more. It kinda felt more involving anyway.

    I've gotta make a choice soon if I want to continue my studies. I've already registered and received my exemptions for the ACCA, but I could always do the same for CIMA if I decide to do it instead.

    Anyone got any advice? Talk me through why one's better than the other or otherwise.

    P.S. I don't think my employer are registered to do the training contracts for ACA.
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    Well CIMA is more focused on mangler accounting, cost accounting and jazz. Seeing that is your interest; why don't ya go for that?

    I was all set for CIMA, but switched to acca the last minute as I was interested in auditing and assurance. Also learning CIMA will give you exemptions in acca. I don't think you are losing out on here unless time is not in your hands...


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