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    (Original post by chrisawhitmore)
    The bill will seek to introduce GCSE and A Level courses for computing as well, to build a pathway for students who wish to carry on, in much the same way humanities, arts and languages are currently treated (start with basic compulsory teaching in KS3 and then allow those who wish to to pick them as optional subjects at GCSE and A-level and thence to the already available degree programmes).

    The hope is that the compulsory element will make sure that most if not all schools will offer this pathway, as they do with other subjects compulsory at KS3
    But if it wasn't necessary to make computing compulsory at KS3 to encourage schools to offer it in addition to/instead of ICT at GCSE, would you still force KS3 students to study it?
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    (Original post by Metrobeans)
    But if it wasn't necessary to make computing compulsory at KS3 to encourage schools to offer it in addition to/instead of ICT at GCSE, would you still force KS3 students to study it?
    In an ideal world, I personally would allow freer choice at KS3 with regards to options, but in a world where there are limited amounts of time, facilities and budget available, we need to ensure that children don't miss out on opportunities to try different disciplines. We are almost certainly losing potential programmers because they simply never get chance to try it and that needs to be stopped.
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    (Original post by obi_adorno_kenobi)
    Keats was a doctor...
    Did it help his poetry much?
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    (Original post by chrisawhitmore)
    In an ideal world, I personally would allow freer choice at KS3 with regards to options, but in a world where there are limited amounts of time, facilities and budget available, we need to ensure that children don't miss out on opportunities to try different disciplines. We are almost certainly losing potential programmers because they simply never get chance to try it and that needs to be stopped.
    You could replace the word 'programmers' in that sentence with almost any profession, so what sets them apart from everyone else?
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    (Original post by Metrobeans)
    You could replace the word 'programmers' in that sentence with almost any profession, so what sets them apart from everyone else?
    Nothing other than that their discipline, despite being wrapped up in almost all aspects of modern life is not taught to any degree at school. There is practically no other profession, and certainly none so important in modern life which is based on skills with no place in the curriculum.
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    (Original post by chrisawhitmore)
    Did it help his poetry much?
    Judge for yourself:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-l..._b_654286.html
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    (Original post by obi_adorno_kenobi)
    Judge for yourself:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-l..._b_654286.html
    I think you may have helped make the case for programming in schools, by showing that knowledge and experience of anything and everything is of use to an artist. Thanks.
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    (Original post by chrisawhitmore)
    I think you may have helped make the case for programming in schools, by showing that knowledge and experience of anything and everything is of use to an artist. Thanks.
    So much for your skeptical tone, then, eh!
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    (Original post by obi_adorno_kenobi)
    So much for your skeptical tone, then, eh!
    What do you want from me, I'm the minister of health. As far as I can tell my job is to be shouted at by as many people as possible while attempting to set a record for the largest amount of money spent without any noticeable effect. I think I'm doing brilliantly so far.
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    (Original post by chrisawhitmore)
    What use chemistry to a poet, or poetry to a chemist? If we only taught universally useful things at school, we would end our schooling once people could read, write and do basic arithmetic, or perhaps before even that.
    That wasn't my point. What I was saying was that those 16 weeks could be devoted to something much more useful than programming, which has a much more specific range of careers/degrees relevant to it than, say, a modern language.

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    (Original post by Mazzini)
    That wasn't my point. What I was saying was that those 16 weeks could be devoted to something much more useful than programming, which has a much more specific range of careers/degrees relevant to it than, say, a modern language.

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    The latest draft of the bill will now mandate that the 16 hours come from the regular IT teaching time. Does that fix this issue for you?
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    (Original post by chrisawhitmore)
    What do you want from me, I'm the minister of health?
    A little less of the "what the **** do you know" in your replies would help. You're not Tuerin, after all. It's patently obvious that experiences flow into one's artistic output and I should have thought even Libers, who seem to reject artistic and humanist endeavour for its lack of moneterised value, would be able to recognise that.
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    (Original post by chrisawhitmore)
    The latest draft of the bill will now mandate that the 16 hours come from the regular IT teaching time. Does that fix this issue for you?
    Yeah, I guess. I didn't actually do IT but from what I've heard it's fairly useless.

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    (Original post by Mazzini)
    Yeah, I guess. I didn't actually do IT but from what I've heard it's fairly useless.

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    You missed a treat. I once spent 2 hours a week for a term 'making a website'. In order to do this, I used a template website from a program, filled in some info, finished inside the first lesson and spent the rest of the term playing flash games while everyone else struggled with frontpage and still ended up with one of the best marks in the class (second to the guy who actually ran an internet company in his spare time and used his actual business website).
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    (Original post by obi_adorno_kenobi)
    A little less of the "what the **** do you know" in your replies would help. You're not Tuerin, after all. It's patently obvious that experiences flow into one's artistic output and I should have thought even Libers, who seem to reject artistic and humanist endeavour for its lack of moneterised value, would be able to recognise that.
    Yeah, sorry if I came across as a ****. It's just that as a science student I've spent years in mixed ability science and maths classes with people saying 'when am I going to use this in real life' while I'm trying to learn.
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    What does the Department of Education think about apprenticeships?
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    (Original post by Smack)
    What does the Department of Education think about apprenticeships?
    Good, with two provisos - it shouldn't take jobs from regular employees and there should be a reasonable.chance of getting a job at the end.

    This was posted from The Student Room's Android App on my GT-I9100
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    (Original post by chrisawhitmore)
    You missed a treat. I once spent 2 hours a week for a term 'making a website'. In order to do this, I used a template website from a program, filled in some info, finished inside the first lesson and spent the rest of the term playing flash games while everyone else struggled with frontpage and still ended up with one of the best marks in the class (second to the guy who actually ran an internet company in his spare time and used his actual business website).
    :teehee:

    (Original post by chrisawhitmore)
    Yeah, sorry if I came across as a ****. It's just that as a science student I've spent years in mixed ability science and maths classes with people saying 'when am I going to use this in real life' while I'm trying to learn.
    Well I'm not exactly bad at science - I got A*s in IGCSE Physics (90%), IGCSE Chemistry (not sure what the percentage was) and IGCSE Biology (91%) with not much revision...
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    (Original post by Mazzini)
    :teehee:



    Well I'm not exactly bad at science - I got A*s in IGCSE Physics (90%), IGCSE Chemistry (not sure what the percentage was) and IGCSE Biology (91%) with not much revision...
    I'd never suggest you were bad (I don't know how the IGCSEs work, are they harder than regular GCSEs? either way, well done) and I certainly didn't mean to imply that you were bad at science.

    It's just that the 'when will I use this' argument is a little annoying, as it's impossible to actually only teach people things they will need.

    For example, as a Chemist I could reasonably expected to never need to learn a programming language, and even if I'd chosen my degree course when I was 11 nobody would teach me to program because it's not usually necessary. It so happens that I've got a placement next year with a team working on a relatively new branch of analytical process chemistry, and I'm going to have to learn basic programming from scratch, never having done it before, which is going to be, I can safely say, a *****.
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    (Original post by Mazzini)
    Well I'm not exactly bad at science - I got A*s in IGCSE Physics (90%), IGCSE Chemistry (not sure what the percentage was) and IGCSE Biology (91%) with not much revision...
    Ah, but that's what money buys you at private school. :sadnod:
 
 
 
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