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    stay away from gold for a couple of weeks.

    It dropped around £200 an ounce between thurs-fri last week alone, and the beginning of this week it's floating around £914 (currently at £913.03).

    At this rate it wont get anywhere close to £1000 for a month - if at all.

    If you were to buy a sovereign (common UK bullion) you'll be looking at paying between £220-250, which makes an ounce cost you £924.28 + P&P (~£12).

    When you sell your gold back, you'll normally get between 95-97% of market value - only the dealers themselves will sell above.

    that means already you need gold to rise above £955 an ounce to break even. Then, every £10 spot goes up you'll be looking at about £6 increase in value max, so if gold levels out at £1040 an ounce as it was before the drop, you'll net about £80 an ounce profit.

    Worth it if you have 20-30 ounces - but for 2 ounces? I'd say not particularly.
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    (Original post by fuzznbass)
    You assume that by investing in stocks the OP would lose all his or most of his money ? Why do people invest in stocks then ? or is it because it is possible to make money ....
    No it is DEFINITELY possible. But what you have to remember is short and long; OP is looking to play long or do lots of shorts.

    You cannot just walk into stocks and shares and make money. It takes a great deal of time and money to get anywhere. You need real skill and insight to make any money. This is why the city exists and will pay crazy amounts for those that can.

    Maybe OP invest £2k in LBG (low - med risk) and makes 15% in a year; after accounting for brokerage fees and stock account fees we are looking at 7-8% of the total amount in fees and costs.

    £2k

    Profit 15% margin £300
    Costs 8% on £2300 = £184
    300-184 = £116

    Which is approximately equivalent to 6% interest. So not bad, but the effort and work gone into it, really doesn't equate.


    Now if he had £10k - 100k, he can make some serious money on shorting stocks. But equally can put in on a low risk portfolio (ie L&G) then make a decent return over a 5-10 yr term.
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    (Original post by zeropoint)
    It depends how you want to get in to gold. There are three main options:

    1. Buy physical gold, usually in the form of coins which you take possession of. Popular option but means to sell it again you have to deal with postage and packaging.

    2. Exchange Trades Funds (ETFs), basically an organisation holds a large pot of gold, and sells ETFs in them which behave like shares. As the gold price moves, the ETF price moves. These are easier to deal with since its all online, but they tend to be more volatile than actual gold. (Example ETF ticker: GLD)

    3. Gold mining shares. Buying shares in gold mines gives you exposure to the price of gold, but it is also influenced by other things like how the mining company is doing. As such you have to pay attention to not just the price of gold, but how the company is doing.

    EDIT: Just realised I didn't answer your question. The price of physical gold varies day on day, but you can buy a 1oz coin for pretty much the price of 1oz gold + 1-3%, so within your price range. For the other two options you woudl need to set up a share dealing account, which may charge you by transaction or periodically. For you needs and ammount, I'd probably go physical gold compared to the other two.
    You do realise gold is plunging down at the moment and most are predicting that is going to continue for some considerable time?
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    You do realise gold is plunging down at the moment and most are predicting that is going to continue for some considerable time?
    Very much so. I certainly wouldn't recommend buying gold now (I think I said as much in a post prior to the one you quoted).

    I just think that there is a fair chance that once gold has stopped going down, it may then go up.
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    (Original post by Makebelieve15)
    Technology is changing so fast and the economic outlook doesn't suggest strong global growth in the near to medium future. Who's to say that Apple will crack the emerging markets and Google and Samsung won't beat them to it? Your 200% rise over 5 years prediction is particularly worrying to say the least.
    (Original post by zeropoint)
    Their share price has dropped 43% since last September. $700 down to $404 (today)

    Apple had a good run, but without a new game changer it is unlikely they will be able to get back on top.

    When the iPod, iPhone and iPad were released they were all easily the best in their class, but now each device is competing against equivalent devices from other companies.
    (Original post by Hanshen)
    IP isn't the only thing that will determine apple's future performance. What about its already strained margins due to various procurement issues it is having currently in china? Apple has opted for an efficiency led oem manufacture with high levels of process innovation and modularisation in order to minimise costs, but what the hell does that do for the responsiveness of the company? Not to mention that it is hideously reliant upon foxconn's manufacturing capability, which is already coming under fire for poor worker conditions. They have recently had to relocate some of their assembly into rural areas in order to keep the labour cost advantage that the value chain's margins depend upon.

    Equally, past performance as an indicator of future success is a dangerous metric. Just because apple is ubiquitous today doesn't mean it will be tomorrow. Similarly the technology/semi process sector is a famously 'blue ocean' industry, in other words the boundary of the market is constantly changing as firms exploit new customer segments (or new markets entirely) that couldn't have possibly been imagined years earlier. Think about 10 years ago, the idea that a social media website could have am IPO similar to that of Facebook was just unimaginable. Similarly entire sectors like biotech, and tablet computers have seemingly sprung from absolutely nowhere. My point is that merely stating that apple have a favourable position from its patents is fairly irrelevant in the medium term. Besides, holding a patent doesn't do much unless you can exploit it successfully. Take the example of xerox, at one time or another that company held the patents for multiple technologies now worth billions in their own right. Nevertheless they focused on photocopiers, lacking the capabilities required to turn a resource into a source of competitive advantage and profit.

    Basically, saying something will thrive because of technology alone doesn't fly. The market is well aware of that.
    (Original post by FranticMind)
    Unfortunately Apple have lost three of their greatest assets:

    1 - Steve Jobs (RIP) absolute revolutionary, read into Apple's history he made and was the driving force of all the big great decisions (obviously not individually, but he is the picture of it)

    2 - Their leadership in beautiful design, they have lost their flagship aluminium shaping as the patent expired and even HP are ripping them off. Iphone pretty much ripped off by Nexus 4.

    3 - Investor and shareholder confidence, the above reasons compounded with the strong performance and backing of Samsung, Google etc.

    Apple are an amazing company, but unless they pull something out of the bag they are not gonna be sitting on their own little mountain anymore.

    I think everybody that replied to my apple post is forgetting that
    1. They have more money than the US government, they can fix anything. They can afford to make mistakes. The first true Apple phone was actually some crappy Motorola with iTunes support. This was a total failure.
    2. Apple is not going 'down'. Steve jobs has basically planned everything out for the future of the company before he unfortunately passed away. Intact, his friends say he talked about a device identical to the iPad in 1993.
    3. Apple is not declining, this is a market strategy. They are waiting for products such as smartphones to mature and let Samsung and google be market leaders for once to see if they can come up with their own ideas. Apple will then act upon these ideas when the time is right.
    4. MOST IMPORTANTLY. Apple has turned things around completely in 10 years.
    Zero to hero
    What will happen in another 10 years?

    Everything has been planned.
    Apple will be market leaders for the rest of your lives

    *im not a fanboy. I own an iPad and a couple of iPods.*


    Posted from TSR iPad
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    (Original post by anonymouse01)
    I think everybody that replied to my apple post is forgetting that
    1. They have more money than the US government, they can fix anything. They can afford to make mistakes. The first true Apple phone was actually some crappy Motorola with iTunes support. This was a total failure.
    2. Apple is not going 'down'. Steve jobs has basically planned everything out for the future of the company before he unfortunately passed away. Intact, his friends say he talked about a device identical to the iPad in 1993.
    3. Apple is not declining, this is a market strategy. They are waiting for products such as smartphones to mature and let Samsung and google be market leaders for once to see if they can come up with their own ideas. Apple will then act upon these ideas when the time is right.
    4. MOST IMPORTANTLY. Apple has turned things around completely in 10 years.
    Zero to hero
    What will happen in another 10 years?

    Everything has been planned.
    Apple will be market leaders for the rest of your lives

    *im not a fanboy. I own an iPad and a couple of iPods.*


    Posted from TSR iPad
    I think it would be more accurate to say Steve Jobs turned things around in ten years, and Apple no longer have his genius. I'm sure Jobs may have made some plans before he left, but I certainly wouldn't bet on his plans matching up with reality, especially in such a fast moving and unpredictable field as technology.

    The idea that Apple's fall from grace is intentional is definitely the sign of a believer. Even if they do, and then they try and copy something Google or Samsung do (and avoid the patent hell), that is no clear path back to the top. Apple have done so well because they made game changers.
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    (Original post by Makebelieve15)

    So, any ideas?
    Utility company shares generally offer decent dividends but little in terms of growth.
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    (Original post by anonymouse01)
    Stocks. Put it all into apple. They are shockingly low at the moment.
    My predictions are 20% rise by the end of this year
    40% by the end of next year
    200% rise in 5 years

    Posted from TSR iPad
    Whilst i do think that Apple is undervalued and will outperform the indices i think your predictions are probably on the high side and certainly your 5 year prediction is in my opinion. Quite simply the level of competition when Apple innovates has increased (probably because companies keep a close eye on Apple now) and so without something extremely revolutionary they are probably looking at steady price gains for the next few years rather than large jumps and phone watches are not what i'm thinking of.

    (Original post by zeropoint)
    Their share price has dropped 43% since last September. $700 down to $404 (today)

    Apple had a good run, but without a new game changer it is unlikely they will be able to get back on top.

    When the iPod, iPhone and iPad were released they were all easily the best in their class, but now each device is competing against equivalent devices from other companies.
    Very debatable on the Iphone front for me. Whilst they did perfect the touchscreen technology (though they were not the first mobile company to try) when i bought my Sony Erricson in late 08/early 09 it was because bar not being a touchscreen just about all the hardware was superior (faster, better camera ect..). It wasn't until the 3GS that i would say they were truly out there.
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    (Original post by Makebelieve15)
    So the years' nearly up and with some hard saving I've ended the year with around £3,000 from student loans and bursaries. I was wondering if there were any low-medium risk investments that could offer 7-15% returns per annum that anyone knows of. I could invest less or slightly more but I just want some suggestions. I'll investigate any reasonable suggestions.

    I've heard stocks and shares are pretty bad unless you're looking a) long term in a solid stock or b) know what you're doing and investing a fair amount as commission eats the investment.

    Savings accounts are awful and this monetary policy is killing savers.

    Premium bonds look pretty safe but nothing is guaranteed. I've read something about mutual funds or offering assistance to start ups (this one is unlikely considering my lack of business experience).

    So, any ideas?
    Given that you say you just want to invest and sit back i suggest an ISA or a managed passive fund.
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    (Original post by anonymouse01)
    I think everybody that replied to my apple post is forgetting that
    1. They have more money than the US government, they can fix anything. They can afford to make mistakes. The first true Apple phone was actually some crappy Motorola with iTunes support. This was a total failure.
    2. Apple is not going 'down'. Steve jobs has basically planned everything out for the future of the company before he unfortunately passed away. Intact, his friends say he talked about a device identical to the iPad in 1993.
    3. Apple is not declining, this is a market strategy. They are waiting for products such as smartphones to mature and let Samsung and google be market leaders for once to see if they can come up with their own ideas. Apple will then act upon these ideas when the time is right.
    4. MOST IMPORTANTLY. Apple has turned things around completely in 10 years.
    Zero to hero
    What will happen in another 10 years?

    Everything has been planned.
    Apple will be market leaders for the rest of your lives

    *im not a fanboy. I own an iPad and a couple of iPods.*


    Posted from TSR iPad
    This is one of the most naive pieces of business analysis I have ever read. No company wishes to undermine sustained competitive advantage by allowing competitors to exploit market advantages and build resources/dynamic capabilities to, 'see what they come up with'. Technology appropriability and knowledge transfer is EXTREMELY valuable to these companies. Allowing another firm to develop new technology and give away first move advantage when you have the distribution network, reputational assets and dynamic capabilities to capitalise upon them is out right lunacy.

    Also having more 'money' than the US government is completely erroneous. You are referring to a figure regarding their unemployed cash surplus some years ago I presume, but it really is irrelevant.

    Equally, the ability for Steve Jobs to make predictions into the future, and accurately forecast responses in what is one of the most changing and dynamic industries in the world (WHILST suffering from cancer) is preposterous.

    Apply did indeed totally turn things around in 10 years, imagine the next 10? Surely that totally undermines your argument. Let's go back to Ford in the 1920s. They did quite a lot more than Apple in the grand scheme of things, not only in process innovation and mass production but also in the design of an entirely new organisational structure. All that before we even get to the success of their model T and bringing the car to the masses. Yet Ford lost market leadership years ago. Today it is in dire financial distress and actually makes more money from its financing operations (which most car companies do today) than it does from the manufacture of automobiles. All it will take for Apple to fall by the way side is a slight shift in the boundaries of the market. For a competitor to change the boundaries of the market or bring a new innovation to market that stimulates competition in a previously uncontested arena. It's already happening with Google Glass etc.

    I'm not saying Apple will 100% fail in the imminent future, but to claim that they are somehow the ONLY company in the entire history of the world that has managed to find a completely fool proof formula for SUSTAINED advantage is downright insane.

    Everything that goes up must come down, and Apple's innovations aren't advancing as quickly as some other firms out there today. At some point this will be their undoing. I would argue, that their competitive advantage is already being challenged. Unless they can respond successfully and protect some of their intangible assets they will lose out heavily in the long run.

    OH and another thing, as I mentioned before. They are having some serious problems with their supply chain. It doesn't matter how well you innovate, if you can't produce your products cheaply enough to give you the margin you require, or be responsive enough to consumer demand... well... in the high tech sector you don't stand much of a chance.
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    (Original post by Hanshen)
    This is one of the most naive pieces of business analysis I have ever read. No company wishes to undermine sustained competitive advantage by allowing competitors to exploit market advantages and build resources/dynamic capabilities to, 'see what they come up with'. Technology appropriability and knowledge transfer is EXTREMELY valuable to these companies. Allowing another firm to develop new technology and give away first move advantage when you have the distribution network, reputational assets and dynamic capabilities to capitalise upon them is out right lunacy.

    Also having more 'money' than the US government is completely erroneous. You are referring to a figure regarding their unemployed cash surplus some years ago I presume, but it really is irrelevant.

    Equally, the ability for Steve Jobs to make predictions into the future, and accurately forecast responses in what is one of the most changing and dynamic industries in the world (WHILST suffering from cancer) is preposterous.

    Apply did indeed totally turn things around in 10 years, imagine the next 10? Surely that totally undermines your argument. Let's go back to Ford in the 1920s. They did quite a lot more than Apple in the grand scheme of things, not only in process innovation and mass production but also in the design of an entirely new organisational structure. All that before we even get to the success of their model T and bringing the car to the masses. Yet Ford lost market leadership years ago. Today it is in dire financial distress and actually makes more money from its financing operations (which most car companies do today) than it does from the manufacture of automobiles. All it will take for Apple to fall by the way side is a slight shift in the boundaries of the market. For a competitor to change the boundaries of the market or bring a new innovation to market that stimulates competition in a previously uncontested arena. It's already happening with Google Glass etc.

    I'm not saying Apple will 100% fail in the imminent future, but to claim that they are somehow the ONLY company in the entire history of the world that has managed to find a completely fool proof formula for SUSTAINED advantage is downright insane.

    Everything that goes up must come down, and Apple's innovations aren't advancing as quickly as some other firms out there today. At some point this will be their undoing. I would argue, that their competitive advantage is already being challenged. Unless they can respond successfully and protect some of their intangible assets they will lose out heavily in the long run.

    OH and another thing, as I mentioned before. They are having some serious problems with their supply chain. It doesn't matter how well you innovate, if you can't produce your products cheaply enough to give you the margin you require, or be responsive enough to consumer demand... well... in the high tech sector you don't stand much of a chance.
    Blah blah blah I'm not listening
    Meh


    Posted from TSR iPad
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    (Original post by anonymouse01)
    Blah blah blah I'm not listening
    Meh


    Posted from TSR iPad
    Nice thought-terminating cliche there.

    I think, 'sent from Ipad' probably undermines your argument slightly :P.

    That said I'm writing this from a Mac so perhaps not! lol
 
 
 
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