Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Chemistry c2 unit 2 aqa monday gcse 20th new spec Watch

  • View Poll Results: Six Mark Question
    Making Soluble Salts
    21.21%
    Making Insoluble Salts
    18.18%
    Electrolysis
    24.24%
    Electroplating
    15.15%
    Rates of Reaction
    18.18%
    Properties of ionic compounds
    21.21%
    Nanoparticles
    33.33%
    Mass Spectrometry
    12.12%
    Gas Chromatography
    15.15%
    Other
    24.24%

    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bballerjl)
    Step 1: add insoluble base to acid. Warm gently on a tripod and gauze (do not boil).
    Step 2: the solution changes colour as reaction occurs, showing the products forms. Excess products can be seen.
    Step 3: when the reaction is complete, filter the solution to remove excess products.
    Step 4: evaporate the water so that the salts start to form. Stop heating when you see the first salts appear at the edge of the solution. Then leave the rest of the water to evaporate slowly.
    I hope this is what you were looking for!
    I'm not entirely sure about this method, i've done the past paper this question is from and they're looking for a basic description of a titration essentially.. Hence the wording of the question 'the amount' needed..
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BuddingAchiever)
    Thank yOu very much !
    I'm not sure how accurate that method is..
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bballerjl)
    Step 1: add insoluble base to acid. Warm gently on a tripod and gauze (do not boil).
    Step 2: the solution changes colour as reaction occurs, showing the products forms. Excess products can be seen.
    Step 3: when the reaction is complete, filter the solution to remove excess products.
    Step 4: evaporate the water so that the salts start to form. Stop heating when you see the first salts appear at the edge of the solution. Then leave the rest of the water to evaporate slowly.
    I hope this is what you were looking for!



    thanks! do we have to learn about 'equilibrium'
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    isint that question goint to be asked in the eam then because titration is not in the new spec for c2
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kam123456)
    thanks! do we have to learn about 'equilibrium'

    no, again, this is in unit 3 spec
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kam123456)
    isint that question goint to be asked in the eam then because titration is not in the new spec for c2
    In my text book they give a basic description of a titration, however it may be worth learning the steps (It's not too complicated) as that should fill in the gaps.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BuddingAchiever)
    no, again, this is in unit 3 spec
    Again, you do need to know a bit on equilibrium... It's called 'reactions that go both ways' in my textbook and is about you guessed it, reversible reactions and equilibrium, although truthfully it doesn't go into much detail on equilibrium itself and I believe you don't yet need an awareness of Le Chaterlies principle.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Also, I think it's more likely to be an evaluation question, rather than one on making salts (which appeared as the 6 marker only last year). Electrolysis was the topic for the 6 marker in January, and on the specimen paper. I predict either nanoparticles or gas chromatography.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    do you think a lot of questions will comeup on half equations and do I need to know the process of hydrated copper sulphate
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    yes and not so much, you just need to have an understanding if they give you a context related question on it
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by StudyScience98)
    Also, I think it's more likely to be an evaluation question, rather than one on making salts (which appeared as the 6 marker only last year). Electrolysis was the topic for the 6 marker in January, and on the specimen paper. I predict either nanoparticles or gas chromatography.
    Everyone's missing the obvious one though? I'd put money on it being about the Haber process and explaining the compromises made.
    Oops.
    Ignore me, forgot I was on the C2 thread and not the C3!
    I actually agree with you, most likely to be on evaluating nano-particles.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    can you please tell me a simple way to work out half equations
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kam123456)
    can you please tell me a simple way to work out half equations
    So you know atoms form ions right? Well however many electrons they lose or gain relates to their charge. A half equation shows the transfer of electrons.
    Say you had An Al3+ ion becoming an Al atom.
    the half equation would be:
    Al3+ + 3e- --> Al
    Sorry, it's hard to write them out properly on the computer. Is that what you were looking for?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    DOES ANYONE HAVE THE MARK SCHEME FOR THE C2 PAPER JAN 13. I have the question paper but not the mark scheme.

    Link to the QP if you want it:
    http://w1.qehs.net/files/docs/exam_r...y_2h_jan13.pdf
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sammann123)
    So you know atoms form ions right? Well however many electrons they lose or gain relates to their charge. A half equation shows the transfer of electrons.
    Say you had An Al3+ ion becoming an Al atom.
    the half equation would be:
    Al3+ + 3e- --> Al
    Sorry, it's hard to write them out properly on the computer. Is that what you were looking for?

    How come sometimes the arrow is after the first symbol and other times it is after two symbols?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kam123456)
    How come sometimes the arrow is after the first symbol and other times it is after two symbols?
    You know in maths that:
    3 - 3 ---> 0
    or
    3 ---> 0 + 3

    Well same difference here:
    Al3+ + 3e- ---> Al
    or
    Al3+ ---> Al - 3e-
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    have you found the mark scheme yet for the 2013 paper? if you have can u please give me the link
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Can anybody help with a chemistry question before the exam tomorrow please?
    if the percentage yield for a reaction is 100%, 60g of product A would make 80g of product C. How much of reactant A is needed to make 80g of product C if the percentage yield of the reaction is only 75%
    thanks
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kam123456)
    have you found the mark scheme yet for the 2013 paper? if you have can u please give me the link
    I haven't
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Blackwell//)
    Can anybody help with a chemistry question before the exam tomorrow please?
    if the percentage yield for a reaction is 100%, 60g of product A would make 80g of product C. How much of reactant A is needed to make 80g of product C if the percentage yield of the reaction is only 75%
    thanks
    So, if it was only 75%, then 60g of A would make 80 times 0.75 which makes 60g.
    There is now a 1:1 ratio where 1g of A makes 1g of B. Therefore toy would need 80g of A to make 80g of B.
    Hope this helps.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you rather give up salt or pepper?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.