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Official WJEC English Literature GCSE Exams - 20th and 23rd May watch

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    Any themes for to kill a mockingbird?

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    (Original post by THEMathlete)
    Any themes for to kill a mockingbird?

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    prejudice, justice..
    and for characters Scout and Tom Robinson are the big ones that haven't come up yet.. i think..
    What kind of quotes are you learning for Tkam?
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    (Original post by THEMathlete)
    Any themes for to kill a mockingbird?

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    Courage
    Equality

    Can't remember the rest :/
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    (Original post by charjoel)
    Does anybody know the rough grade boundaries for each paper? I can't find them anywhere.
    The grade boundaries last year for the Unit 1 paper was:
    A* = 42/50 raw marks (63UMS)
    A = 36/50 raw marks (56 UMS)
    B = 30/50 (49 UMS)
    C = 25/50 (42 UMS)
    D = 20/50 (35 UMS)

    I highly doubt they will change the grade boundaries by much. I think you'll be safe for an A* if you get 8/10 for the extract, 17/20 for the essay and 17/20 for the poems. Hopefully the A* grade boundary stays in the 39-43 area and doesn't go up by much which I'm sure it won't.
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    I have this exam tomorrow. Just completed a poetry comparative essay, feeling alright about it. Anyone know the grade boundaries for the coursework?
    Anyway, I'm doing Of Mice and Men, I actively know about 40 quotes. I have made online flashcards, if anyone wants them I'll post a link. My teacher says I should be able to get an A* but I'm not very sure. Guess I'll just have to wait and see. I can go very deep into the books and poems but I need to ensure that my writing flows and I include historical context. Anyone know how much I should include?



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    (Original post by Krollo)
    I have this exam tomorrow. Just completed a poetry comparative essay, feeling alright about it. Anyone know the grade boundaries for the coursework?
    All I remember was 34/40 was an A* and 37 was 40/40 UMS.
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    Good-oh, I got 36 so I should be alright get an A* and an A on the exams.

    Probably.


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    (Original post by Krollo)
    Good-oh, I got 36 so I should be alright get an A* and an A on the exams.

    Probably.


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    I got 36 too! (my macbeth let me down apparently) It was 48 UMS last year

    I got 62/70 in unit 1... Which is one from.an A*

    So.we're in the same boat!
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    Does anyone know any good resources or links? This is literally last minute revision for OMAM and also AIC. I have no idea what characters to revise or anything so could someone just give me some tips and guidance. I'm doing higher AQA


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    I can't find any model answers anywhere? Anyone found any?
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    Can someone help me write A/A* answers - I'm struggling to get it upto A* work! Any suggestions?
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    (Original post by katiemcswiney)
    Can someone help me write A/A* answers - I'm struggling to get it upto A* work! Any suggestions?
    Make your essay flow.
    Use embedded quotes in a sentence rather than PEE.
    Remember to talk about how everything links to the social/historical context of the novel.
    Talk in detail about language.
    Pick out key information from the novel, only short quotes not really long ones to support your ideas.
    To make original points that aren't obvious to everyone - ie something that is not written in revision guides that everyone talks about.


    If you cover all of those I'm pretty sure you will get A*. Hope this helps!
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    (Original post by Krollo)
    I have this exam tomorrow. Just completed a poetry comparative essay, feeling alright about it. Anyone know the grade boundaries for the coursework?
    Anyway, I'm doing Of Mice and Men, I actively know about 40 quotes. I have made online flashcards, if anyone wants them I'll post a link. My teacher says I should be able to get an A* but I'm not very sure. Guess I'll just have to wait and see. I can go very deep into the books and poems but I need to ensure that my writing flows and I include historical context. Anyone know how much I should include?



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    Yes please!
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    for the 20 mark essays theres almost always a theme based question and a character based question. i'm doing of mice and men tomorrow and for themes i learnt fate, loneliness and dreams as these are the main ones, others could be discrimination, friendship, injustice or hardships. I think the character question could be on george, candy or curley's wife or maybe about the presentation of women. there are also the odd questions that could always pop up like a title question, why did steinbeck call it omam, or perhaps to discuss the animal imagery in the novel or even how settings are important
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    https://www.brainscape.com/mweb/shar...public/1340847 for the quote flashcards. You need to make an account.


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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    All I remember was 34/40 was an A* and 37 was 40/40 UMS.
    34 was an A*? Is this an estimate or a confirmed figure and do you have the figure for an A or a B?
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    (Original post by Red Fox)
    34 was an A*? Is this an estimate or a confirmed figure and do you have the figure for an A or a B?
    Last year's boundary, I'm gonna sleep soon, just use wjec grade boundaries
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    could some give me a list of mice and men quotes i could use tomorrow in my exam please
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    For a past paper for 20 marks in 40 minutes on the question 'How does Stienbeck create sympathy for Lennie' I wrote this, was wondering what grade it would be?

    With Lennie, a character based upon Stienbeck’s experiences with an itinerant of whom he witnessed stab a boss through the chest with a pitchfork and promptly be incarcerated into a mental asylum, Stienbeck has created a character completely at juxtaposition from the rest of the characters in the novel, and this is clear from the offset. For instance, in the opening, he appears as though his psyche is that of a child, with George and he in this seemingly parentally helixed relationship, for instance, George denies Lennie information about ‘what had happened up in weed’, citing reasoning as ‘If I tell you you’ll just do it again’, inferring to us that there’s something not quite right about Lennie that needs to be hidden from himself.

    A child is innocent, but an animal takes naivety that one step further, having no moral sense of judgement, and linguistically Lennie is described as though he is an animal, with Stienbeck’s overuse of animalistic metaphor describing to the reader his ‘big paw’ and being further described as a ‘bear’, which shows us how unaware of his own strength and complexly naïve he really proves to be. This is propagated in the form of him squashing mice, and then denying, ‘I ain’t got no mice’, and furthermore justifying that he ‘just wanted to pet it’, which again shows how out of place and dangerous his innocence can be. We are also thrown inside of his mind, toward the end of the novella, and subjected to a bizarre mental encounter with a ‘giant talking rabbit’, which delved extremely deeply into the odd nature in which Lennie viewed the world.

    This is extended later in the novel, where he ends up killing a ‘pup’ slim gives him, and justifying it by saying ‘why’d you have to get killed, you ain’t as small as a mouse’, which leads us to complete the idea of Lennie having no grasp upon reality and a foreclosure of guilt, which provides the fact that he has some kind of developmental disorder, especially strengthened by George disallowing him from saying anything; ‘I ain’t gon say nothing!’, which arouses suspicion with the boss.

    This arouses such great sympathy due to the environment Lennie is subjected to, with the furthest diagnosis being, from Curley’s wife, ‘you’re nuts!’, which is something I find somewhat jarring, because he clearly has extensive needs for which alas there are no such provisions for, and even more so, this world seems to pertain to the social Darwinist ideals of the weak not surviving, such as Curley’s dog or the Slims pups being drowned.
    Despite everything that happens, Lennie is a rather innocent person, such as George says ‘He would never do nothing out of meanness’ after Slim, whose ‘understanding was beyond thought’, provided a similar prognosis.

    There’s not an ounce of malice or nefarious means to any action of which he had partaken in, such as, up in Weed, he only ‘held on too long’ to her dress because it was ‘all he knew to do’ and merely ‘liked the feel of velvet’, which extends to the killing of Curley’s wife, this provocative and attention seeking troubled nameless woman, where she began to ‘scream’ and, again, because he knew not of how to react, he ‘held on’ and due to his ‘strength’ he ended up ‘breaking her neck’.

    After which, he attempted to bury her in the hay, naively thinking this may help, and said ‘I done another bad thing. I done a real bad thing. George is gonna’ be mad’, displaying that his moral objectivity is in fact but relative to his expectations set by George’s reactions, showing how delicate his psyche is, and therefore making the audience feel a weird sense of sympathy for Lennie in the very moment at which he murders somebody, because he appears to be another victim.

    As well as this, Lennie relishes in the retelling of their dream of ‘living offa’ tha’ fat of the land!’ and ‘tending to Rabbits’ and makes George retell it to him, again like a small infant, which is jarringly closed off at the end when he says it back to George, fully believing the dream is achievable, despite previously saying one of the most real things in the novella ‘ I think we knowed it would never happen’.

    Despite his inadequate grasp on language, he speaks a stark truth and a sympathetic one, as this bonded symbiotic dream shared by the two parties was something for them to latch onto, and now it’s being taken away from their grasp in spite of Lennie only wanting to please George. For instance, when he’s willing to sacrifice his own wellbeing for George’s will, ‘I made him jump in a river’, and when Lennie himself says ‘I’ll go live in that cave!, shows how likeable a character he really is, made oh so jarring by the predicaments he faces, arguably causal to societal defects.

    Lennie, unwittingly having a murderous mob tailing him and a gun ‘shaking violently then calmly’ cocked at his head, submits himself to unmitigated ignorant bliss, and has an almost prolepsis into this ungraspable dream world. He repeats the story back at George with memorized ease, almost mirroring the prior events of the novel, as George lodges a bullet in his cranium, not out of spite, but to save his friend from the wrath of merciless itinerants and to let him die happy, the most sympathetic of deaths, if there ever was one, confirmed by Slim as ‘you hadda, George, I swear you hadda!’

    The final line, uttered by Carlson, the very same who shot Candy’s dog and owned the gun under question, is ‘Now what do you suppose is eatin’ them to’ which is the final mental blow to the reader as to how emotionally incompetent this world of loneliness and great depression induced itinerants really is, even more so than whatever disorder Lennie may have had, the inability to realize that George killing his only friend would have any effect on him, emotionally, is perhaps the most jarring moment in the entirety of the novella.

    Thaaaanks!
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    How did people find this exam?

    I did the question on Curley and found is pretty easy, used about 10 PEEs.

    The poetry was decent, language wise I talked about metaphors, similes and personification and the use of rhetorical questions.

    For the extract question on Crooks I only did 3 PEEs, put I filled up a page.
 
 
 
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