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Has Uri Geller been confirmed psychic? watch

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    He couldn't predict that his friend Michael Jackson would die so young.
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    Geller is invited to become the public face of the Spoon Council - home of "the most useful implement in the cutlery draw".

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    Interestingly, Uri Geller's Wikipedia article states that a Israeli court found he has perpetrated a fraud by claiming his feats are telepathic.

    I'm not going to put too much faith in Wikipedia though, especially as there is no visible source article for these claims and it happened over forty years ago.

    Nevertheless, there is plenty of other stuff there about more plausible explanations for his 'abilities'
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    I think most people, especially the typical profile of individual on this forum, are unwilling to accept that they are more than their physical body, such is the strength of the conditioning they have received/inability to break it.

    To accept or believe in the possibility of psychic ability would really mess up their comfy perceptions of life, causing them to ask some difficult questions about the state of the world as a whole. That being so, they would chose 'the easy option' of denial. This of course filters through in their comments on this thread.

    So whether Geller is a fraud or not I don't know, but one thing is certain in that he has become extremely wealthy for exploiting his 'talents'. On top of his well publicized income streams, oil giants pay him big money to fly around in a helicopter for oil prospecting. Nice gig if you can get it.
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    Well,

    looking at monks breaking bricks with their heads and stuff...

    In theory we use a small % of brain power for everyday lives. What about the majority of unused %? Apparently humans are capable of using as of yet unknown parts of their brain to control the electromagnetic fields around them which if controlled right can control electromagnetic fields elsewhere.

    For example, use brain to use electro field to manipulate field around a spoon and bend it.

    With Monks, they use their brain to control their electrofield to weaken the bricks electro field or to protect their heads from push/pull forces or whatever so they can break the brick without injuring themselves.

    It's just a theory though and I havn't explained it like a proper scientist but I'm tired and blah.

    We still don't know everything about the brain yet nor our own electromagnetic fields which the ancients mistaken for Chi apparently.

    I'm sure it's all physics really.
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    he's a confirmed bull****ter. Do you really think that magic people exist?
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    (Original post by SamW78)
    I think most people, especially the typical profile of individual on this forum, are unwilling to accept that they are more than their physical body, such is the strength of the conditioning they have received/inability to break it.

    To accept or believe in the possibility of psychic ability would really mess up their comfy perceptions of life, causing them to ask some difficult questions about the state of the world as a whole. That being so, they would chose 'the easy option' of denial.
    A rational person does believe in the possibility of psychic ability. They just demand scientific evidence for it.

    Magicians can duplicate everything Geller does. In fact, Geller was a straight up magician in his youth. And nowadays, he does not claim to be psychic. In an interview with Magische Welt, Geller admitted to not having supernatural powers.
    I’ll no longer say that I have supernatural powers. I am an entertainer. I want to do a good show. My entire character has changed.


    I don't think denying psychic claims is the easy option; accepting them without good evidence is the lazy option.
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    (Original post by GrazzleDazzle)
    Well,

    In theory we use a small % of brain power for everyday lives. What about the majority of unused %? Apparently humans are capable of using as of yet unknown parts of their brain to control the electromagnetic fields around them which if controlled right can control electromagnetic fields elsewhere.

    For example, use brain to use electro field to manipulate field around a spoon and bend it.
    We do not use a small % of our brains. This is a persistent myth that has nothing to support it. All parts of the brain create and react to electromagnetic fields. This does not mean we can do magical things. How exactly could a brain change an electro(magnetic?) field to bend a spoon? Think about how powerful an electromagnet would need to be to bend a spoon (>5 T?), then compare to the strength of field produced by brain tissue (about 0.2 pT).

    (Original post by GrazzleDazzle)
    We still don't know everything about the brain yet
    We don't know everything...therefore magic!?
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    (Original post by chazwomaq)
    A rational person does believe in the possibility of psychic ability. They just demand scientific evidence for it.

    Magicians can duplicate everything Geller does. In fact, Geller was a straight up magician in his youth. And nowadays, he does not claim to be psychic. In an interview with Magische Welt, Geller admitted to not having supernatural powers.
    I’ll no longer say that I have supernatural powers. I am an entertainer. I want to do a good show. My entire character has changed.


    I don't think denying psychic claims is the easy option; accepting them without good evidence is the lazy option.
    He seems to have switched back again recently to claiming that he has 'powers' (lol) - the programme he did about how he nullified the radar in Egypt for the Mossad as part of the rescue of the Entebbe hostages (haha) and showed them exactly where Iran keeps their underground nuclear stores (lulz) had him in full "Godlike Psychic" bull**** mode.

    I think basically whenever he's getting a bit low on funds (which for him is probably down to his last $10m) he invents a new Psychic Phenomenon story. He probably uses a PR company or something to work on the details. In the past he's been a water prospector (failed), oil prospector (failed), locator of escaped felons (no evidence of any captures) and (apparently) top secret agent for the United States - on the lunatic fringe military-run 'Remote Viewing' programme, which was eventually dumped on the orders of Congress because, er, it didn't work.

    What the Geller story repeatedly shows is that even well trained objective and cynical people can be very, very gullible when presented with a clever showman and confidence trickster.
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    (Original post by chazwomaq)
    A rational person does believe in the possibility of psychic ability. They just demand scientific evidence for it.

    Magicians can duplicate everything Geller does. In fact, Geller was a straight up magician in his youth. And nowadays, he does not claim to be psychic. In an interview with Magische Welt, Geller admitted to not having supernatural powers.
    I’ll no longer say that I have supernatural powers. I am an entertainer. I want to do a good show. My entire character has changed.


    I don't think denying psychic claims is the easy option; accepting them without good evidence is the lazy option.
    I chose parapsychology as one of my final year units.

    Parapsychology is the scientific study of phenomena such as ghosts, ESP etc, and based on the research that was going on at my uni I noticed that it leaned heavily on belief in such phenomena rather than the phenomena itself, questionnaires are so much easier to work with than actual parapsychological events.

    Parapsychology is a dying subset, to go into a career as a parapsychologist is career suicide. Why because of the rather pompous attitude of 'scientists' who dismiss everything that doesn't fit with their understanding. They wish to maintain their dominance, but fail to realise that non-acceptance of new discoveries is itself anti-science. Their motives are to keep their funding and status. See Gregg Braden if you wish to wake up.

    My own personal conclusion, as the unit never went there, was that using scientific tools to examine something which doesn't fit within positivism is a bit of a joke, parapsychology really needs to stop its yearning for mainstream 'scientific' recognition, and go down an alternative path in terms of research methods.

    There is no doubt in my mind that people exist that have some kind of ability, off the top of my head I could name Nina Kuligina, whether these are exceptional individuals, or whether all humans have this as dormant ability, I don't know for sure but I do have my suspicions.

    All I'm saying is evidence is kept from you, and that any evidence available is based on scientific methods which are inadequate to study metaphysics.
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    (Original post by SamW78)
    questionnaires are so much easier to work with than actual parapsychological events.

    Parapsychology is a dying subset, to go into a career as a parapsychologist is career suicide. Why because of the rather pompous attitude of 'scientists' who dismiss everything that doesn't fit with their understanding.

    using scientific tools to examine something which doesn't fit within positivism is a bit of a joke, parapsychology really needs to stop its yearning for mainstream 'scientific' recognition, and go down an alternative path in terms of research methods.
    any evidence available is based on scientific methods which are inadequate to study metaphysics.
    Actually, scientists spent large portion of the twentieth century examining parapsychological and supernatural claims. Even some very logical positivist scientists like Hans Eysenck looked into it (and was quite sympathetic!). However, the facts are that none of these claims have stood up to testing. So any scientist who goes down that route nowadays is being disingenuous - the tests have been done, the claims don't add up, so don't waste your time studying it. It's like a geographer pursuing flat-earth theory, or an engineer trying to invent a perpetual motion machine.

    Ad you may know, the Randi foundation offers a $1m prize who anyone who can conclusively demonstrate their supernatural powers.

    Science is simply the best means of discovering what is true. What possible alternative could there be?
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    (Original post by chazwomaq)
    Actually, scientists spent large portion of the twentieth century examining parapsychological and supernatural claims. Even some very logical positivist scientists like Hans Eysenck looked into it (and was quite sympathetic!). However, the facts are that none of these claims have stood up to testing. So any scientist who goes down that route nowadays is being disingenuous - the tests have been done, the claims don't add up, so don't waste your time studying it. It's like a geographer pursuing flat-earth theory, or an engineer trying to invent a perpetual motion machine.

    Ad you may know, the Randi foundation offers a $1m prize who anyone who can conclusively demonstrate their supernatural powers.

    Science is simply the best means of discovering what is true. What possible alternative could there be?

    Yes science has attempted to explore everything, but it is only suitable for a 3rd dimensional 5 sense reality. You fail to understand what I'm saying about metaphysics and the scientific method, i.e. it has limitations and is not ultimate truth as we have been led to believe.

    I'm not here to convince you of this or that, as it is clear you've already made your mind up on the matter, just know that there is more to what can be seen, heard, touched, tasted, and felt. All I want people to do is open their mind a little.

    If you hold an iota of the scientific principle of accepting new findings (which is something the mainstream scientists don't do in order to hold their dominance) you could spare some time to watch Gregg Braden. He comes from scientific background, and explains the problems with science, he touches upon many things like anti-science, ancient civilizations and their advanced technology, and the old evolution chestnut (which completely puts the argument beyond doubt using scientific methods btw, but most will never hear this b/c of the dominance of those who hold the power).

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=whKrENfkMEM
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    Surely he can't be confirmed.. seeing as it's all fake.
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    (Original post by SamW78)
    I chose parapsychology as one of my final year units.

    Parapsychology is the scientific study of phenomena such as ghosts, ESP etc, and based on the research that was going on at my uni I noticed that it leaned heavily on belief in such phenomena rather than the phenomena itself, questionnaires are so much easier to work with than actual parapsychological events.

    Parapsychology is a dying subset, to go into a career as a parapsychologist is career suicide. Why because of the rather pompous attitude of 'scientists' who dismiss everything that doesn't fit with their understanding. They wish to maintain their dominance, but fail to realise that non-acceptance of new discoveries is itself anti-science. Their motives are to keep their funding and status. See Gregg Braden if you wish to wake up.

    My own personal conclusion, as the unit never went there, was that using scientific tools to examine something which doesn't fit within positivism is a bit of a joke, parapsychology really needs to stop its yearning for mainstream 'scientific' recognition, and go down an alternative path in terms of research methods.

    There is no doubt in my mind that people exist that have some kind of ability, off the top of my head I could name Nina Kuligina, whether these are exceptional individuals, or whether all humans have this as dormant ability, I don't know for sure but I do have my suspicions.

    All I'm saying is evidence is kept from you, and that any evidence available is based on scientific methods which are inadequate to study metaphysics.
    There's no objective or reliable evidence of any kind that Nina Kulagina (her name was spelt 'Kulagina' by the way, this is the Wikipedia article -
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nina_Kulagina) - was anything other than the usual trickster. Soviet paranormal science was notoriously riddled with wishful thinking and quackery; they felt they were in a 'psychic arms race' with the US and the people who ran it were very clever liars who kept well paid jobs by bull****ting.
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    (Original post by SamW78)
    Yes science has attempted to explore everything, but it is only suitable for a 3rd dimensional 5 sense reality. You fail to understand what I'm saying about metaphysics and the scientific method, i.e. it has limitations and is not ultimate truth as we have been led to believe.

    I'm not here to convince you of this or that, as it is clear you've already made your mind up on the matter, just know that there is more to what can be seen, heard, touched, tasted, and felt. All I want people to do is open their mind a little.

    If you hold an iota of the scientific principle of accepting new findings (which is something the mainstream scientists don't do in order to hold their dominance) you could spare some time to watch Gregg Braden. He comes from scientific background, and explains the problems with science, he touches upon many things like anti-science, ancient civilizations and their advanced technology, and the old evolution chestnut (which completely puts the argument beyond doubt using scientific methods btw, but most will never hear this b/c of the dominance of those who hold the power).

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=whKrENfkMEM
    Braden spouts pseudo-scientific nonsense.

    There's a good article about his rubbish here.
    http://skeptico.blogs.com/skeptico/2...oint_to_g.html
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    (Original post by GrazzleDazzle)
    Well,

    looking at monks breaking bricks with their heads and stuff...

    In theory we use a small % of brain power for everyday lives. What about the majority of unused %? Apparently humans are capable of using as of yet unknown parts of their brain to control the electromagnetic fields around them which if controlled right can control electromagnetic fields elsewhere.

    For example, use brain to use electro field to manipulate field around a spoon and bend it.

    With Monks, they use their brain to control their electrofield to weaken the bricks electro field or to protect their heads from push/pull forces or whatever so they can break the brick without injuring themselves.

    It's just a theory though and I havn't explained it like a proper scientist but I'm tired and blah.

    We still don't know everything about the brain yet nor our own electromagnetic fields which the ancients mistaken for Chi apparently.

    I'm sure it's all physics really.
    We use a small percentage of our brain at any one given time. I read that we use virtually all of it at some point. So saying that the other 90% might have magic powers is plain wrong.

    Monks who can break blocks are not magic, but that is not to diminish their talent. They can only do that through decades of hard work and commitment. A friend of mine does karate, he says his sensei hits a rock as hard as he can with the sides of his hand dozens of times every morning. If you or I were to do that we'd likely break every bone in our hands but this guy worked his way up over the decades to harden up his skin and bones. I'm sure people who punch through concrete will do the same.
    To me, this is FAR more impressive than "magic" - just by hard work and commitment can someone do something that is far beyond what normal humans can do!
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    There's no objective or reliable evidence of any kind that Nina Kulagina (her name was spelt 'Kulagina' by the way, this is the Wikipedia article -
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nina_Kulagina) - was anything other than the usual trickster. Soviet paranormal science was notoriously riddled with wishful thinking and quackery; they felt they were in a 'psychic arms race' with the US and the people who ran it were very clever liars who kept well paid jobs by bull****ting.

    I am sorry but Wikipedia is hardly the bastion of academic excellence, especially considering that anyone can edit the information.

    FYI her psychokinesis ability was never dis-proven, every test that was devised for her she did successfully.

    Yes there was an element of cold war propaganda, but as you are unaware I shall complete the picture for you.

    Oct 1970 Gaither Pratt & Champe Ransom of the (American) Duke University tested her abilities, this was done in collaboration with the Russians, a Genady Sergeyev (physiologist and mathematician) and a Konstantin Ivanenko (mathematician and computer expert). During this meeting Kulagina managed to move a matchbox provided by Pratt, imprint an image on photographic film. Amazed by what they saw they set up a camera to film her next test, Ransom spread aquarium gravel in the centre of the table, placed a nonmagnetic cylinder upright in the middle of the gravel, and inverted a tall glass over it. Kulagina was able to move the cylinder through the gravel.

    What was really amazing was how she never sold out (unlike Geller) and preferred to stay out of the limelight.

    Broughton, R.S. (1991). Parapsychology. Ballantine Books: New York.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Braden spouts pseudo-scientific nonsense.

    There's a good article about his rubbish here.
    http://skeptico.blogs.com/skeptico/2...oint_to_g.html

    In what way is he spouting pseudo scientific nonsense? Can you be more specific so we can have a reasonable debate based on science rather than wikipedia or someones blog? He was a geologist and talks about the scientific techniques used in excavating finds, he talks about the ancient cities from archeological digs that show mankind has been going for a lot longer than 5000 years. As in there have been 5 cycles of primitive to advanced, then catasphrohies that have wiped each cycle out only to start again.

    This is the classic response from a sheep, I'm sorry but your knowledge is 30 years out of date and marred your inability to accept that there is more going on than the official line.

    His comments on evolution were based on the finding and DNA testing of a preserved Neanderthal girl, perfectly intact with skin and eyes. What is unscientific about DNA testing?

    I'm not saying science is sh*t as GB uses science to demonstrate that the evidence and facts do not fit with the official line. Understand? Besides science is limited insofar as dealing with metaphysics, dark matter etc.

    Anyone can set up a blog, it is merely someone's opinion.

    I could setup a blog 'disproving' the link autism and the MMR vaccine. Although you should know that the link has been scientifically proven and courts in Australia and Italy have forced big pharma to compensate victims. The point is you didn't hear about it, as you didn't hear about the Neanderthal girl, in the link I provided, GB gives a journal reference for the DNA testing of the Neanderthal girl, what is psuedo-scientific about this please?

    I await your response.
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    (Original post by Manitude)
    We use a small percentage of our brain at any one given time. I read that we use virtually all of it at some point. So saying that the other 90% might have magic powers is plain wrong.

    Monks who can break blocks are not magic, but that is not to diminish their talent. They can only do that through decades of hard work and commitment. A friend of mine does karate, he says his sensei hits a rock as hard as he can with the sides of his hand dozens of times every morning. If you or I were to do that we'd likely break every bone in our hands but this guy worked his way up over the decades to harden up his skin and bones. I'm sure people who punch through concrete will do the same.
    To me, this is FAR more impressive than "magic" - just by hard work and commitment can someone do something that is far beyond what normal humans can do!
    Chi energy is not magic as you call it.

    Labeling it as such forces inaccurate perceptions in the mindset of the everyday person.

    What you say is correct to an extent, there is much conditioning of the physical body involved in such demonstrations, but there is more than conditioning involved.

    When you see a shaolin monk resting his full body weight between a spear and his neck, you will know that no amount of conditioning can 'toughen' the neck to not become pierced.

    They have trained in such a way to concentrate Chi energy at various parts of the body at will.

    Chi is all around us, the practice of Tai Chi cultivates this energy, drawing it into our body more readily than just breathing.
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    (Original post by SamW78)
    Chi energy is not magic as you call it.

    Labeling it as such forces inaccurate perceptions in the mindset of the everyday person.

    What you say is correct to an extent, there is much conditioning of the physical body involved in such demonstrations, but there is more than conditioning involved.

    When you see a shaolin monk resting his full body weight between a spear and his neck, you will know that no amount of conditioning can 'toughen' the neck to not become pierced.

    They have trained in such a way to concentrate Chi energy at various parts of the body at will.

    Chi is all around us, the practice of Tai Chi cultivates this energy, drawing it into our body more readily than just breathing.
    It's not magic. But it's a mysterious energy with absolutely no explanation in physics, which has never been measured by any scientific instruments but can be manipulated by people who move in a certain way?

    Makes sense.
 
 
 
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