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I've got a degree, I shouldn't be stacking shelves Watch

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    (Original post by c_al)
    What I was getting at was how few jobs there are in the photography field. If you're a student starting a degree in photography, surely most of them realise that their chances of getting a job in that field are slim to none.
    failing to see where irony and talent come into the scenario of a small job market...
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    The BBC are taking the p*** by having somebody with a photography degree. I have nothing against the subject, but it's not exactly the epitome of employability, so the general public are going to look at the article, think 'entitled', and have no sympathy for all the Physics graduates looking for jobs in academia, or unemployed lawyers etc. I find it very irresponsible of them.
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    (Original post by Octohedral)
    It's also a stupid law. When I was stacking shelves aged 16 I got paid £4.50 per hour, whilst the 18 year old next to me was being paid £5+. For exactly the same amount of work. Both of us were saving for university, so why on earth not just pay us for the work we do?
    [That wasn't part of the thread, I just thought I'd write it in case David Cameron came along.]
    It is not a stupid law. Why should a 16 year old who is living at home and not paying a penny in bills, food costs etc have the same wage as an 18 year old who left school at 16 and started working, moved out and is now paying bills etc? It doesn't matter if the work is exactly the same, older people usually have more responsibilities, just because there are some who do not doesn't mean that a communist style law should be brought in and all young people get paid the same wage no matter what.

    Your logic of all 16-20 year olds getting paid the same wage because they are 'all of university age' is ridiculously flawed because not everyone at that age does the same thing.

    On another note, why on earth are you complaining about not being paid an 18year old wage when you were going the same job? When I was 16 I was doing similar work to 21 year olds who earned £6 while I was on minimum wage of £3.30, so I suggest you be grateful that you were well above minimum wage.
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    Being a graduate is tough. It must be especially bad if you have a non-vocational degree. But the world has changed and a degree doesn't entitle you to anything but debt.

    My sister fought against pressure from her family who were trying to force her to go to uni. And this was to study drama. My sister is not academic so this would have been useless for her. She has just landed an apprenticeship at one of the best theatres in London and I'm very proud. This way she will make contacts within the industry and be paid a wage whilst gaining a qualification. Surely that is more useful than £30,000 of debt?

    There are other routes into employment for people and these shouldn't be frowned upon. I did a vocational degree with a very defined career structure so it was different for me, but I've still had to play the game by networking, doing courses and showing interest in my spare time.

    Most student work hard to build up contacts and networking opportunities whilst at uni, but the bbc has done a good job of highlighting a minority with a sense of entitlement.
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    (Original post by c_al)
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/23686814

    This kind of thing annoys me personally, as some people seem to think getting a degree should automatically give them an amazing job and they will therefore reject any job that they do not deem worthy of themselves.

    I also find it hilariously ironic that one of the people in the article has just completed a degree in photography and yet is moaning about wasted talent.
    To be fair, time was that you used to be able to walk into a great job with a decent degree, but that was because there were far, far fewer of them about, and the...(don't hate me for this) "mickey mouse" topics being taught at degree level today which could be better learnt elsewhere (an e.g. might be photography, which could possibly done via an apprenticeship) were just not taught.

    However, times have changed, and a degree on it's own is worth less now than it used to be in my view - ergo it's harder to get a really good job to start with. Of course it'd be nice if a degree could get you into any job you wanted, but you've got to be realistic about it - if you're not going to get on the job ladder without taking some of the lower paid, more menial work to begin with, then you may as well bite the bullet and get it done as a stepping stone to your further career...

    That's my view on it anyway.
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    I think trying to find an employer to hire you with just a photography degree is a bit awkward. Fair enough if you wanted to make your own business - I have a cousin who has just opened up her own business in an industrial unit, although she doesn't have any degree, she's just been working in Debenhams as a Merchandiser and doing her photography business at the same time for years now.

    It might have been better if he did some form of graphic design, which would cover photography and also give him lots of other creative experience. Although yet again, that still doesn't guarantee anything.

    I'm going back into education in September with the hopes of being employed in graphic design, but I don't have an entitled attitude. I know there is no guarantee of a job, but when I've looked at some graphic design jobs online in Scotland, they've required a HND or a degree to apply for them, so it's best for me to take a course and I want to. If no employer wants to hire me at the end of my degree, so be it - I still have the intent and goal to make my own money by selling design and crafts, and I'd be happy to do any job whilst I do that. No job is below me and I'd rather work than stick my nose up at a shelf stacking job like this guy is doing. :eek:

    He said: "The government shouldn't be encouraging me to stack shelves or things like that. That's a waste of talent. It's a waste of resources." - the government isn't entitled to do anything with his talent - its up to him to utilize his skills and try and make his own business, and work in any job available to get an income.

    And lastly, I can't imagine how anyone would have the attitude that having a degree will get them employed - have they not heard about the mass unemployment for the past few years? And the amount of graduates we have?
    :confused:


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    (Original post by bestofyou)
    It is not a stupid law. Why should a 16 year old who is living at home and not paying a penny in bills, food costs etc have the same wage as an 18 year old who left school at 16 and started working, moved out and is now paying bills etc? It doesn't matter if the work is exactly the same, older people usually have more responsibilities, just because there are some who do not doesn't mean that a communist style law should be brought in and all young people get paid the same wage no matter what.
    It's perfectly logical that two people doing the same job get the same money. I can understand why it might be a matter of economy - lower wages fairly distributed allowing more jobs etc - but if that wasn't the case then it's none of the supermarket's / government's business what responsibilities the employee has.

    Your logic of all 16-20 year olds getting paid the same wage because they are 'all of university age' is ridiculously flawed because not everyone at that age does the same thing.
    I didn't argue that. I just meant I personally earned my savings whilst I was 16 specifically so I could pay bills when I was older, and concentrate on getting qualified. Someone doing that gets penalised for being responsible.

    If anything 'not everyone of that age does the same thing' adds to the claim they should all get the same wage, because how can you differentiate someone who leaves school at 16 to work in a supermarket and an 18 year old fully funded through university by their parents?

    On another note, why on earth are you complaining about not being paid an 18year old wage when you were going the same job? When I was 16 I was doing similar work to 21 year olds who earned £6 while I was on minimum wage of £3.30, so I suggest you be grateful that you were well above minimum wage.
    It has nothing to do with complaining or being grateful. I'm now 21 - it has no effect on me whatsoever - I'm simply saying that I disagree with the law (unless it is economically based) on behalf of current 16 year olds.
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    Why is the guy on the video not doing freelance work? :confused:
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    (Original post by Octohedral)
    It's perfectly logical that two people doing the same job get the same money. I can understand why it might be a matter of economy - lower wages fairly distributed allowing more jobs etc - but if that wasn't the case then it's none of the supermarket's / government's business what responsibilities the employee has.
    I didn't argue that. I just meant I personally earned my savings whilst I was 16 specifically so I could pay bills when I was older, and concentrate on getting qualified. Someone doing that gets penalised for being responsible.
    If anything 'not everyone of that age does the same thing' adds to the claim they should all get the same wage, because how can you differentiate someone who leaves school at 16 to work in a supermarket and an 18 year old fully funded through university by their parents?
    It has nothing to do with complaining or being grateful. I'm now 21 - it has no effect on me whatsoever - I'm simply saying that I disagree with the law (unless it is economically based) on behalf of current 16 year olds.
    there are 18 year olds out there who are supporting themselves, whilst the number of 16 years olds doing the same is considerably smaller. That is why the minimum wage is in place, to ensure that people who are supporting themselves earn enough to do so. That is why it is a not stupid law. It doesn't matter if you are saving to pay bills when you are older or not.
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    The guy in the video is missing the point - he can still look for photography jobs, but if he wants to eat in the meantime he can fund himself rather than feeling the government ought to do it for him.
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    (Original post by c_al)
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/23686814

    This kind of thing annoys me personally, as some people seem to think getting a degree should automatically give them an amazing job and they will therefore reject any job that they do not deem worthy of themselves.

    I also find it hilariously ironic that one of the people in the article has just completed a degree in photography and yet is moaning about wasted talent.
    On the flip side, we're told throughout our childhood that we should study hard at school otherwise we'll end up stacking shelves at Tesco. So we worked hard at school, then college and then university and left with a good degree.

    After all that, to end up stacking shelves at Tesco is a bit frustrating isn't it?
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    It's funny when people seem to think they are above stacking shelves or cleaning etc.

    Yet they aren't above taking the tax payers money while they sit on their bums being all proud and ignorant.

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    (Original post by Rooster523)
    On the flip side, we're told throughout our childhood that we should study hard at school otherwise we'll end up stacking shelves at Tesco. So we worked hard at school, then college and then university and left with a good degree.

    After all that, to end up stacking shelves at Tesco is a bit frustrating isn't it?
    Yes, its not really the graduates fault, since I doubt most 18 years olds who are about to start uni are hugely aware of the realities of the economic situation that they will be stepping into when they graduate.

    I guess this is what happens when you try to get 50% of people into university, as something is always going to decrease in value the more common it becomes.
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    Boy am I glad HRMC sent me a tax-refund check the other day. Don't know how I would've survived without it. :moon:

    lol that guy should've focused on building skills whilst doing his degree at University. As in, behaving like an individual who has already graduated despite still studying. What I mean is, he should be doing extra-stuff that professional photographers do daily to add to his CV, beyond the basic theory of Photography and portfolio everyone makes!

    I haven't graduated, yet I have employers calling me (usually recruitment companies) about twice every two weeks or so, saying they saw my CV on Total Jobs or something. Saying my CV's "interesting" - putting me forward for jobs with quite good pay if I must say. No degree required - then again I wonder whether part of it is due to being in the New Media/Creative industry as you barely need any qualifications for that. Just initiative

    Can't remember the last time I physically applied for a job, it gets tiring after a while. Still need to work on my interview technique though, I think it sucks.
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    After I qualified in fitness and exercise at Liverpool college some years back I thought I'd be going into the fitness industry, but instead I had no option but to take work cleaning offices. It is unfortunate but this is the way it is for some people.
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    I don't mind the fact that he thinks he's too good to be stacking shelves, I know a lot of ignorant people who think they are above part time shop jobs. But it's the fact he's on benefits. Doing a university degree doesn't mean you'll walk into your dream career at the end of it. You may have been led to believe that buy your parents, school etc. But really, you should've thought "Wait, what happens when I graduate?"
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    while people should get any job they are able to get, it does annoy me that the people telling us that we should not be too proud to get jobs stacking shelves are the same people who have been telling us our whole lives that stacking shelves is for failures.
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    I think the guy was absolutely ridiculous. I'd gladly have his job after I graduate just so I can earn some money and get experience.

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    Job snobbery aggravates me. Just doing a degree isn't enough any more, people should know this. Do you have work experience? Can you detail the skills your degree provides you rather than just plastering it on a CV? Did you take up any positions of responsibility during your time at university? If not, you're only making it hard for yourself.
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    I'd be quite happy with a job stacking shelves. As I'm about to do a Masters degree, virtually every job vacancy I've seen has asked for full flexibility which I obviously can't do and as I'm about to do a Masters and thus full time education, I'm not eligible for Jobseekers.

    Job stacking shelves would suit me just fine.
 
 
 
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