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Foreigners doing native language as qualification, fair or not? Watch

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    There should be a separate a level:

    Spanish (or any language) First Language
    Spanish (") Second language

    Like there is in Welsh
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    There should be a separate a level:

    Spanish (or any language) First Language
    Spanish (") Second language

    Like there is in Welsh
    As it happens, there actually is a Spanish first language AS! But no A2.

    Would be a nightmare to decide who does which one though.
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    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    As it happens, there actually is a Spanish first language AS! But no A2.

    Would be a nightmare to decide who does which one though.
    If you have:
    - Spanish Descent
    - It's often in records the language you speak at home

    :dontknow: it is hard, but if someones parents have Spanish fluency and the kids learnt from them from a young age... I'd say it should be"first" language, even though it isn't...
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    If you have:
    - Spanish Descent
    - It's often in records the language you speak at home

    :dontknow: it is hard, but if someones parents have Spanish fluency and the kids learnt from them from a young age... I'd say it should be"first" language, even though it isn't...
    Hmmm but then that would also be prejudice! You can't assume that someone speaks a language based on where their parents are from! Languages don't always get passed on to the next generation, and when it is, it's often just an artificial knowledge barely enough to be able to describe what you've done last weekend, let alone discuss the pros of global warming on the current economic climate whilst accurately demonstrating a wide range of language...well you get the idea

    What about people who have parents that are able to take them on frequent holidays abroad? Should they be penalised for having an advantage too?

    You see what I mean...it's just a never ending nightmare

    They could however, make the *harder* language qualification equate to more points/grades. That way the "more able" students would be more attracted by the "harder option" no matter what their background is
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    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    Hmmm but then that would also be prejudice! You can't assume that someone speaks a language based on where their parents are from! Languages don't always get passed on to the next generation, and when it is, it's often just an artificial knowledge barely enough to be able to describe what you've done last weekend, let alone discuss the pros of global warming on the current economic climate whilst accurately using a wide range of language...well you get the idea

    What about people who have parents that are able to take them on frequent holidays abroad? Should they be penalised for having an advantage too?

    You see what I mean...it's just a never ending nightmare

    They could however, make the *harder* language qualification equate to more points/grades. That way the "more able" students would be more attracted by the "harder option" no matter what their background is
    :dontknow:

    The holiday one is stupid that's not unfair.
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    :dontknow:

    The holiday one is stupid that's not unfair.
    It really is...:rolleyes: (if you venture out of the resort and interact with the locals)

    Full immersion is the best resource and all that ^^
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    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    It really is...:rolleyes: (if you venture out of the resort and interact with the locals)

    Full immersion is the best resource and all that ^^
    Yeah, but it's not unfair. They're learning for themselves like, it depends on age they travel as well
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Yeah, but it's not unfair. They're learning for themselves like, it depends on age they travel as well
    Yes, when I said "frequent" I actually meant as of a young age.

    Not everyone has the option of a holiday to their target language country though. And at a young age the pockets of your parents are going to be the deciding factor tbh^^
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    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    Yes, when I said "frequent" I actually meant as of a young age.

    Not everyone has the option of a holiday to their target language country though. And at a young age the pockets of your parents are going to be the deciding factor tbh^^
    Still doesn't substitute a native patent

    How old is young? How often is frequent!
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Still doesn't substitute a native patent

    How old is young? How often is frequent!
    A native parent who makes a decent effort to teach you the language*
    Language skills are not passed on in DNA

    An advantage is an advantage is an advantage! But only if the advantage has an impact on you.
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    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    A native parent who makes a decent effort to teach you the language*
    Language skills are not passed on in DNA

    An advantage is an advantage is an advantage! But only if the advantage has an impact on you.
    Whatever I'll still be doing French
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Whatever I'll still be doing French
    C'est bonne! Try doing an A-level language where 90% of the candidates have godly language skills *cough cough*
    French suddenly looks real good now ey fish?
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    (Original post by thatitootoo)
    C'est bonne! Try doing an A-level language where 90% of the candidates have godly language skills *cough cough*
    French suddenly looks real good now ey fish?
    What's that? I might do some A Levels when I'm old :moon:
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    What's that? I might do some A Levels when I'm old :moon:
    Turkish....or Dutch. These are brutal
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    Yes, it has to, is and should be allowed. Take my case. I am bilingual Spanish - English, and I consider my English as a first language. However having been brought up in Spain I didn´t have the option of taking English language and literature GCSE´s. When it later came to applying to university, I found myself arguing in perfectly decent English the need to prove my English level to admissions tutors. It made no difference, I still had to take the IELTS to prove my level of English was good enough to be admitted, despite being a native speaker. If I hadn´t been able to validate my language skills, I would not be at university now. So yes, it is perfectly reasonable for native speakers to take exams of their language as a second language. It is just a validation of their ability to speak it.
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    I think fair. I did Polish at A-level and seeing as hardly anyone but native Polish people take it you're up against native speakers. It's probably harder than the standard say Spanish A-level too (there is no speaking exam so guessing that it's assumed that you're native).
    And if you were to sit the A2 with no preparation you would not do well... you have to learn proper history (or film), and read books.
    A lot of people seem to assume that it's easy but they don't realise that you do actually have to put in a lot of effort... I had to go to school every Saturday morning, and had about 2 essays for homework a week on top of 4 other a-levels, driving lessons, young enterprise blah blah etc etc. good 5h a week at least. I know that people may say that a different qualification would take up more time, say biology but this is usually an extra on top of all other a-levels.
    Also, I honestly don't think it's all about knowing the language... they look at how you think. I had a friend who did Polish too but she was very Polish, only hang out with Polish people, spoke Polish to her friends and she did worse then people who were born here, who speak English to their friends.
    Sooo I think fair!
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    Just to add to the general mix of views: the International Baccalaureate offer many languages as either "foreign" or "native". Everyone has to do one "native" language, but the bilingual can opt to do two "native" languages. This is incredibly hard as for each "native" language you have to read a huge number of books - if my memory serves me rightly, I believe it is 11 books at Standard level and 14 at Higher level. So if you are offering double "native" languages both at Higher level you'll be studying 28 books on top of your Maths, Science and Humanity! The difficulty in the UK is finding the teachers to teach these languages as "native" languages - which is possibly the reason why A level examination boards do not offer it as an option.

    One of my sons did the IB and was going to offer French as a "native" language (because he is bilingual, having spent most of his life in France) but ended up having to do it as a "foreign" language instead as the school could not provide a suitable teacher.
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    I'm sorry but it is fair because english people have an advantage with their exams because they are all in english whereas for someone who struggles with english, that will be extra workload. You might as well give them something
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    Can I just state there's a difference in being able to speak a language and doing an exam in it.
 
 
 
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