Birmingham - Second City?? Watch

moonkatt
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#41
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(Original post by Mr_Vain)
This guy is from Birmingham. Heard he was from round Aston.

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=2515995
I see this and I raise you an Ian Brady.
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bazookabrad
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#42
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http://www.economist.com/news/britai...-strikes-again
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Fullofsurprises
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#43
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Very interesting. It sounds as if Manchester has been well run politically. However, I feel that article glosses some of the problems - the city still has some of the most deprived areas in Britain and intractable social problems - it also has some depressing violence, although I'm sure Birmingham does too. Their metro system is very impressive and it would be great if more big British cities had them.
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tehforum
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#44
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Very interesting. It sounds as if Manchester has been well run politically. However, I feel that article glosses some of the problems - the city still has some of the most deprived areas in Britain and intractable social problems - it also has some depressing violence, although I'm sure Birmingham does too. Their metro system is very impressive and it would be great if more big British cities had them.
Birmingham's building one.
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beanstalkgirl_24
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#45
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(Original post by tehforum)
Birmingham's building one.

Birmingham has a metro, between Snow Hill and Wolverhampton. It is being extended to New Street Station, and then Centenary Square.
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L i b
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#46
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Birmingham is at best a mixed bag. It is amazing that the second largest city in a major country makes as little cultural impact as it does - people simply don't talk about it in the same way as the do Manchester, Edinburgh, York or even Bristol. It's barely on the map.

I've been a couple of times. It had a good few things to commend it: the canalside areas are particularly impressive. The city centre itself has a lot of pleasant Victorian stuff going on and a lot of modern architecture too. Pubs seemed welcoming. There was something about the scale that made it seem more intimate than most large cities.

However, walk a couple of streets off the main path and there were countless abandoned buildings: I'd never seen anything quite like it in Britain before. When I was walking past a nightclub, seemingly entirely populated by black people, there was effectively a riot going on out the front before huge numbers of police descended - again, never seen the likes of that before or since. I was quite shocked by that.

So yeah, I don't know - I can't imagine it ever really changing its standing in the country.
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nulli tertius
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#47
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(Original post by Kiss)
Glasgow!
Birmingham is the Second City of England and the Workshop of the World (and one of about eight Venices of the North)

Glasgow is the Second City of the Empire.
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Midlander
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#48
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#48
(Original post by Rakas21)
Its regarded as the second city because of population and GDP (though population does affect that).

In 2011 the West Midlands (essentially greater Birmingham) had 2.7m people while Greater Manchester had 2.6m. If memory serves Birmingham has a GDP of £90bn (twice Wales for interest) and Manchester has £85bn.

Personally i don't like the location of Birmingham and Manchester is much better connected (less than an hour by train to Liverpool, Sheffield and Leeds), it's possible that Manchester will become the second city.
Coventry is 25 miles away from Birmingham, as is Wolverhampton-I suggest you do your homework a bit better next time.
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Midlander
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#49
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(Original post by L i b)
Birmingham is at best a mixed bag. It is amazing that the second largest city in a major country makes as little cultural impact as it does - people simply don't talk about it in the same way as the do Manchester, Edinburgh, York or even Bristol. It's barely on the map.

I've been a couple of times. It had a good few things to commend it: the canalside areas are particularly impressive. The city centre itself has a lot of pleasant Victorian stuff going on and a lot of modern architecture too. Pubs seemed welcoming. There was something about the scale that made it seem more intimate than most large cities.

However, walk a couple of streets off the main path and there were countless abandoned buildings: I'd never seen anything quite like it in Britain before. When I was walking past a nightclub, seemingly entirely populated by black people, there was effectively a riot going on out the front before huge numbers of police descended - again, never seen the likes of that before or since. I was quite shocked by that.

So yeah, I don't know - I can't imagine it ever really changing its standing in the country.
The Midlands itself struggles to be recognised as a distinct region, which is a massive irritation to those of us from there. Talk of the North/South divide by either side puts us in the opposing category when in actual fact we have things in common with both.

Bristol and Manchester are hardly paradises in themselves and Manchester in particular is notorious for being a hotbed of crime as much as Birmingham is. The West Midlands in particular has a rich history to it and to branch it all as pseudo Birmingham does a massive disservice.
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by L i b)

However, walk a couple of streets off the main path and there were countless abandoned buildings: I'd never seen anything quite like it in Britain before. When I was walking past a nightclub, seemingly entirely populated by black people, there was effectively a riot going on out the front before huge numbers of police descended - again, never seen the likes of that before or since. I was quite shocked by that.

So yeah, I don't know - I can't imagine it ever really changing its standing in the country.
Although to be fair, you can see similar scenes to the one you describe outside a nightclub in parts of London too.

When I've been to Manchester, I've been struck by the large, depressed-looking areas that circle the city centre - I think the large cities outside London have generally still not fully recovered from the decline of traditional manufacturing industries and other key parts of the pre-1980s economy and they show it. They've all made progress, but there's still a long way to go.
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Fullofsurprises
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#51
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
Birmingham is the Second City of England and the Workshop of the World (and one of about eight Venices of the North)

Glasgow is the Second City of the Empire.
There are stacks of 'Venices of the North'. It's a very popular title. :rolleyes:

I seriously doubt that Birmingham is really the 2nd City of England - surely that is Manchester? Or at least, most people think so. I believe the two conurbations are very closely similar in population. Birmingham is a much larger local authority, but that's just down to the arbitrary nature of government boundaries, because Manchester is surrounded by 'towns' like Salford, which are in reality just part of the city.

Is there still an Empire then? I thought we'd abolished it. Good news for Glasgow though, I imagine they will want to get in on the coal trade and cotton again - and making all those ships, steam engines and boilers for the colonies.
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uktotalgamer
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#52
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It's the second worst place in the UK, if that's what it means. The place is an absolute dump.
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barnetlad
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#53
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I always thought it was the second city based on population, and the role it had in the Victorian times. I do tend to think culturally of Manchester as second after London though.
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nulli tertius
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#54
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
There are stacks of 'Venices of the North'. It's a very popular title. :rolleyes:

I seriously doubt that Birmingham is really the 2nd City of England - surely that is Manchester? Or at least, most people think so. I believe the two conurbations are very closely similar in population. Birmingham is a much larger local authority, but that's just down to the arbitrary nature of government boundaries, because Manchester is surrounded by 'towns' like Salford, which are in reality just part of the city.

Is there still an Empire then? I thought we'd abolished it. Good news for Glasgow though, I imagine they will want to get in on the coal trade and cotton again - and making all those ships, steam engines and boilers for the colonies.
Manchester, or rather was, "the largest village in England".

Salford is not a town; it is a City and has been since 1926.

I suspect Birmingham was traditionally seen as more important because Manchester was a trading post whilst Birmingham was a manufacturing city and because Manchester was not necessarily the most important city in Lancashire with Liverpool battling it out with London to be the largest port in Britain.

For much of the last 20 years or so, Leeds would have considered itself the strongest commercial centre in the North.
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Fullofsurprises
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#55
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
Manchester, or rather was, "the largest village in England".

Salford is not a town; it is a City and has been since 1926.

I suspect Birmingham was traditionally seen as more important because Manchester was a trading post whilst Birmingham was a manufacturing city and because Manchester was not necessarily the most important city in Lancashire with Liverpool battling it out with London to be the largest port in Britain.
Yes, I was wrongly using the dismissive word 'town' to describe Salford - for sure, it is officially a city.

I just read that Manchester's magnificent City Hall was built in 1868, whereas the smaller neo-classical Birmingham Town Hall dates from the 1830s, so perhaps you're onto something about the historical relativities.
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nulli tertius
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(Original post by Fullofsurprises)
Yes, I was wrongly using the dismissive word 'town' to describe Salford - for sure, it is officially a city.

I just read that Manchester's magnificent City Hall was built in 1868, whereas the smaller neo-classical Birmingham Town Hall dates from the 1830s, so perhaps you're onto something about the historical relativities.
But Birmingham still does civic grandeur on the heroic scale



That is where the child protection budget went.
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username917703
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#57
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(Original post by beanstalkgirl_24)
Birmingham has a metro
:laugh:

Was waiting for someone to point it out.
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Dumachi
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#58
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Meanwhile: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england...shire-24972911
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Fullofsurprises
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#59
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
But Birmingham still does civic grandeur on the heroic scale



That is where the child protection budget went.
The new library does look stunning, I saw a programme about it on the Culture Show.

I seriously doubt Birmingham is the only city with stressed child and social services, most of the big urban centres are in a mess with it, due to soaring demand and government cuts.
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Fullofsurprises
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#60
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Odd that an article about Coventry pops up in the Shropshire part of the BBC local news website. :confused:
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