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    (Original post by Rainbow Student)
    OK, now for a comment that actually makes some sense:

    16 hours as a part time job whilst doing (3 you say?) A levels would personally be too much for me, but if you can handle it, that's fine. I'd make it a bit less though, if I were you. I do 4 AS levels and people in my situation have been advised by the college to do no more than 8 hours a week. :eek: You do one less course and you do twice as much! :clap2: Wow lol. Tbh it's up to you.
    I done 4 AS and now it's A2 I'm doing 3 .. I want to get AAA or at least AAB so I think it's best I cut down
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    (Original post by tink15)
    Whilst studying a levels? It's over 3 days x


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    I did 18-20 hours a week during a-levels and college and i did fine.
    You just have to organise your time.
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    (Original post by Emma:-))
    I did 18-20 hours a week during a-levels and college and i did fine.
    You just have to organise your time.
    How did u do x


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    (Original post by Rainbow Student)
    Oh no... lol. The only one I like there is Maths And why no January exams? :confused:
    A-Levels don't have a January entry point now. All examinations must be sat in the June of each year.
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    I realise I'm in the minority here, but to be honest no, I don't think it should be too much if you manage your time well. I'm 21 so older and a little more experienced which may help, but I worked somewhere between 16 and 20 hours a week last year, volunteered one evening a week at the local hospital and have a lot of responsibilities at home [looking after 5 year old sister, cooking meals as mum works and dad is disabled and so needs help], and I managed AAAB in my AS levels [maths, human biology, psychology and chemistry respectively]. This year I am working 20 odd hours a week [I have a car and all associated costs to pay, plus other essentials, so not working is not an option] and still helping at home, although I have had to give up the voluntary placement to help my father more, and on course for AAA [I dropped psychology]. I have a reasonable amount of down-time, although granted I don't have much of a social life - my friends moved away recently - so post-shift drinks are my main social thing.
    It looks good on a Uni application to show that you can handle work and still get good grades, and I think it sets you up better for life if you can learn to cope. Yes it may mean foregoing the odd party, but time management is such an essential skill to learn.
    But, if it is too much for you and you can afford to cut it down, it may well be worth doing so - grades are more important! Personally, not only do I have to earn to pay for the car [which is essential, no public transport at all where I live, so no car, no college, no work, no social life], but I need that extra something to do with my time. I have two jobs, one waitressing [which was my career for 3 years prior to going back to college], and one as a support worker for Mencap, and I love both of them. It gets me out of the bubble of academia, and out there meeting and working with people. Getting a job at Uni will be much easier with my experience, and to be honest, I've worked since I was 16 and would feel at a loose end if I didn't have a couple of shifts lined up a week! If my parents gave me money, and I lived in town so didn't need a car, would I give up work? Tbh I'm not sure I would, the occasional week where there's been no shifts available for me and I've actually felt quite down and at a loose end by the end of it, but that could be just me - I have had the odd issue with mild depression of late, so keeping busy is important to me.

    Tl;dr: Ultimately, it's your choice; yes, grades are important, but I personally find that the benefits [not just the money] of working as well make it worthwhile for me. Do what makes you happy, and will best set you up for your future.
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    (Original post by AdamskiUK)
    A-Levels don't have a January entry point now. All examinations must be sat in the June of each year.
    I do AS levels and we've just had our January "mock" exams, or do you mean official exams?
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    (Original post by Rainbow Student)
    I do AS levels and we've just had our January "mock" exams, or do you mean official exams?
    Officially.

    I do A2 and last year, you got a chance to sit the first half of your AS or A2 levels in January. So if you were doing Maths, for example, you would sit Core 1 in January and then Core 2 and your other chosen module (I took Statistics 1) in June. You could also resit January modules in June. This was the same for all 4 (or 3) of your AS-subjects. This year is the first year January modules weren't used for either AS or A2. All exams must be sat in June.

    So about 1 week ago last year I was doing 4 different AS exams, one for Physics, Maths, Biology and Chemistry each.

    We get mocks at the end of February in A2! They simulate January exams and then we'll generally have most content finished by the beginning of May with ~4 weeks to revise and prepare for *every* exam. AS exams tend to be a little early, especially Science. They start on about May ~20th whereas A2s are early-mid June.
 
 
 
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