did you or do you know people that got into lse that fell short of their offer? Watch

SevenDeuceOff
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#41
Report 12 years ago
#41
(Original post by hannah_111)
Yeah they are out of line. I'm more accepting of the situation now, however on results day i was really mad at them as on the UCAS website, it has the dates on when updates were made and LSE rejected me immediately on the Monday they got my results which makes me think they didn't even look at my circumstances! I still got 4 A's as well which i'm sure is more than some people on the law course!
Don't give up. You got 4 A's. You had an epileptic fit during the exam you got a B in. You had a written record of it on the day. You have an extremely strong case.
0
quote
reply
Ethereal
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#42
Report 12 years ago
#42
Firstly, Epilepsy cannot be diagnosed after one event. Any person can have a seizure at some point in their life but that doesn't mean they have Epilepsy. Epilepsy is the pre-disposition to repeated seizure events. I should think 2 months is not long enough to have had a proper diagnosis of Epilepsy because there is no definitive test for it. A diagnosis of Epilepsy is a clinical decision made on the basis of description of seizure event and the ruling out of all other possible seizure causing conditions and events. Furthermore, it can only be diagnosed correctly by a consultant, not by a GP. LSE will know that, and are probably also doubtful of such a speedy diagnosis.

That said, there is nothing to stop the original poster asking LSE to reconsider. However, I would argue they are under no legal compulsion to do so. They are not rejecting her because of a disability. They are rejecting her because she failed to meet an aggregate mark over a period of 2 years. She also managed to achieve the higher grade in her other subjects. Unles she can catagorically prove the one exam was so far below the others that it dragged her grade down, and can manage to guilt trip them into taking the mitigating circumstances into account I would say she doesn't really have much chance. They haven't precluded her because she has a disability so the DDA does not apply.

Sorry I couldn't give you good news, but that's just the way it is. The attitude of accepting you didn't get into LSE and trying somewhere else is the right one to take. Incidently, you would have been better off looking at clearing striaght away and going to another good law school this year. I should think that most of the good clearing places have gone now though.
0
quote
reply
Parisian Scot
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#43
Report 12 years ago
#43
(Original post by Ethereal)
Firstly, Epilepsy cannot be diagnosed after one event. Any person can have a seizure at some point in their life but that doesn't mean they have Epilepsy. Epilepsy is the pre-disposition to repeated seizure events. I should think 2 months is not long enough to have had a proper diagnosis of Epilepsy because there is no definitive test for it. A diagnosis of Epilepsy is a clinical decision made on the basis of description of seizure event and the ruling out of all other possible seizure causing conditions and events. Furthermore, it can only be diagnosed correctly by a consultant, not by a GP. LSE will know that, and are probably also doubtful of such a speedy diagnosis.

That said, there is nothing to stop the original poster asking LSE to reconsider. However, I would argue they are under no legal compulsion to do so. They are not rejecting her because of a disability. They are rejecting her because she failed to meet an aggregate mark over a period of 2 years. She also managed to achieve the higher grade in her other subjects. Unles she can catagorically prove the one exam was so far below the others that it dragged her grade down, and can manage to guilt trip them into taking the mitigating circumstances into account I would say she doesn't really have much chance. They haven't precluded her because she has a disability so the DDA does not apply.

Sorry I couldn't give you good news, but that's just the way it is. The attitude of accepting you didn't get into LSE and trying somewhere else is the right one to take. Incidently, you would have been better off looking at clearing striaght away and going to another good law school this year. I should think that most of the good clearing places have gone now though.
You are obviously well versed on this topic so I'm totally prepared to bow to the superior authority. However, even if the OP may not be epileptic, even an isolated seizure incident must surely qualify as mitigating circumstances. Although it may never occur again, it doesn't change the fact that it did occur and consequently negatively impacted on her exam results. Furthermore, although I appreciate your superior knowledge on this issue, do you really think LSE would have reservations about accepting the certified conclusions of the GP, assuming he/she provided some justification that a seizure had occured?
0
quote
reply
Ethereal
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#44
Report 12 years ago
#44
I don't think they would be dubious in accepting it effected that one particular exam, but don't forget A-Levels are now marked over a period of 2 years and so in all honesty unless she failed the exam completely it wouldn't make too much of a difference. Also, the exam boards should have taken this into account and adjusted her grade accordingly so her grade shouls till be a true reflection of what she has achieved during the A-Level.
0
quote
reply
hannah_111
Badges: 0
#45
Report 12 years ago
#45
It has not been 100% confirmed that i have epilepsy and i never stated that it has. I have had a brain scan, EEG, have been asked to return to discuss the results with my consultant and as we all know the NHS waiting lists for consultants can be quite long so yes it has taken a while. However my consultant has said that it's "most probably" epilepsy as it was not an "isolated" incident as i have had a few other fits since the first one. and you say "LSE will know this and be doubtful of a speedy diagnosis" NOBODY EVER TOLD LSE I HAD EPILEPSY all that was sent to LSE was a letter stating that i had a fit in one if my exams and a hospital note confirming a seizure and that was it. And as for saying that the exam board take into consideration what happens yes they do however if you look on the AQA website you will see that the maximum they give is 5% and for a seizure it's likely to be only 3% max. I achieved A's in all 5 modules but a C in the exam i had a fit in so i dont think my final grade was a true reflection.

I do not need any clearing places thank you as i did have an insurance university which i have been accepted into.

Also can i just say Thank you to everyone on here (minus one) for their help and concern! It's really appreciated! ) )
0
quote
reply
guccilittlepiggy
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#46
Report 12 years ago
#46
with all due respect hannah, ethereal was only trying to help because he has knowlege of this sort of thing and a law degree and it was me who asked him seeing hes the only one qualified to give his opinion. The information you gave was vague and you didn't state anything regarding the nature of the seizure besides you had an "epileptic fit", so thats what you were given advice about. Theres no need to be rude towards someone who only wanted to help you.

Anyway good luck in your insurance uni.
0
quote
reply
hannah_111
Badges: 0
#47
Report 12 years ago
#47
Well i didn't feel the need to be detailed as to be fair i was only posting a rejection response to "did you or do you know people that got into lse that fell short of their offer?" I also think that if he needed more information to help, then he should have asked instead of making a number of wrong assumptions which seemed to portray me in a bad light.
0
quote
reply
guccilittlepiggy
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#48
Report 12 years ago
#48
well fair enough but when people are trying to help you its not nice to ignore them if they don't say what you want to hear. You were fine when people were saying that LSE must have been wrong. Anyway it doesn't matter much, I'm sure you'll have a great time at your insurance.
0
quote
reply
hannah_111
Badges: 0
#49
Report 12 years ago
#49
I never ignored him. I was offended. I also said in previous posts that i'm much more accepting of the situation now after the obvious initial upset and secondly that if LSE is full then they are full and that's not their fault. So please don't give me the "if people dont say what you want to hear" line.
0
quote
reply
Chi-sama
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#50
Report 12 years ago
#50
(Original post by Xaphania)
Also, as an International student, I think you'd get preference over home students if you slightly miss your offer; its understandable really, since your paying so much more! Congratulations on getting a place
Isn't there some type of regulation as to the percentage of home to overseas students the LSE could take in each year?
0
quote
reply
hannah_111
Badges: 0
#51
Report 12 years ago
#51
I don't think there is. According to the THES the LSE is part of a pressure group called G5 (LSE Cam, Ox, UCL, Imperial) who have said that they will turn away British undergrdauates in favour of international students in protest against the lack of state funding.

Sir Richard Sykes, rector of Imperial, said: "Imperial does not have any cheap courses. We will press the government to recognise this or lift the [£3,000] cap [on fees]. If they say our courses are too high quality and too expensive, we will not reduce our quality. We will have to look at expanding the number of postgraduates and overseas undergraduates we take."
0
quote
reply
Knogle
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#52
Report 12 years ago
#52
(Original post by Chi-sama)
Isn't there some type of regulation as to the percentage of home to overseas students the LSE could take in each year?
Not officiall AFAIK.. but they do need to take a minimum number of home students to obtain state funding IIRC.
0
quote
reply
Ethereal
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#53
Report 12 years ago
#53
(Original post by hannah_111)
I never ignored him. I was offended. I also said in previous posts that i'm much more accepting of the situation now after the obvious initial upset and secondly that if LSE is full then they are full and that's not their fault. So please don't give me the "if people dont say what you want to hear" line.
You stated you had an epileptic seizure. If it hadn't been diagnosed as epilepsy you should have said you had had a seizure not and "epileptic" one. By the way, there are other things that cause more than one event - stress being one of them. The exam board only give upto a maximum of 5% allowance because that is what they deem fair.

The advice I gave was sound and realistic. I have epilepsy myself, and also have a law degree, so I know a little bit more about how the DDA affects your situation than people saying you should fight it. I had seizures throughout my A-level exams, and mine were terminal rather than modular so it had a far greater affect on my grade than one exam did on yours. I was also only given a 3% allowance.

Just because advice isn't what you want to hear ie "awwwww you have a strong case fight fight", doesn't make it bad advice nor does it make it unsupportive.

I was doing someone a favour my answering this, and from what I have seen since you have been rude to them as well as me. I think you need to adjust your attitude a little.
0
quote
reply
hannah_111
Badges: 0
#54
Report 12 years ago
#54
(Original post by Ethereal)
The advice I gave was sound and realistic. I have epilepsy myself, and also have a law degree, so I know a little bit more about how the DDA affects your situation than people saying you should fight it. I had seizures throughout my A-level exams, and mine were terminal rather than modular so it had a far greater affect on my grade than one exam did on yours. I was also only given a 3% allowance.

Just because advice isn't what you want to hear ie "awwwww you have a strong case fight fight", doesn't make it bad advice nor does it make it unsupportive.

I was doing someone a favour my answering this, and from what I have seen since you have been rude to them as well as me. I think you need to adjust your attitude a little.
Okay, well the way i see it is that i never came on this thread looking for help nor excpecting it i posted on a thread entitled "did you or do you know people that got into lse that fell short of their offer?" and that was it, although i was pleasently surprised at the response i got and which shows there is a lot of caring people on here. However what i did not appreciate
is that you were speaking to me as if it was me who had said about the DDA and having a strong case etc when in fact i was the first to realise that although i believed LSE to be slightly unfair that i did not have a case against them, they were full up and i did not meet the grades. End of. That is why i have accepted my insurance choice.And if you see my previous comments you will see that. So again please don't tell me that i'm not happy when people tell me what i don't want to here as i was not unhappy with your comment because you said i didnt have a chance of getting into LSE - Been rejected by LSE was the hardest thing i have ever to hear yet i was the first to accept it and move on.

I was mostly not happy with your comment as i felt that i was been made out to be a liar as a result of some of your comments such as "only a consultant could have made a diagnosis not a GP" and another was when you said LSE would not believe a speedy diagnosis as its impossible to tell in 2 months. Those comments made by you are true, however you made them based on assumptions about me such as GP/consultant thing. Which i felt was wrong. If you really did want to give sound advice then i feel the best way would have been to ask me something rather than assume

I also think a better way to approach it, again if you were genuinely wanting to help would have been to send me a private message as i personally am not particularly comfortble posting personal medical information on the internet.

And as for saying that given 3% is fair, well then that's your opinion however it seemed unusual to me that in the exam i had a fit in, i was unable to complete the paper and was taking to hospital due to a head injury i was given only 3% however i was kept in hospital and therefore missed two Chemistry modules completely yet i was awarded an A grade for both those exams.

I also don't believe i was rude to your friend. I merely explained why i had not been detailed and explained why i was offended by the post
0
quote
reply
Xaphania
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#55
Report 12 years ago
#55
(Original post by 2late)
Xaphania, I read somewhere that you got 478 UMS marks... I'm really sorry to hear that =(. It's ridiculous because I'm sure there are 'marking errors'... not every examiner can spot the correct answer, think about the amount of papers they mark, the deadlines put on them. Tiredness also comes into play after marking the 200th paper etc. so I'm sure there are some mistakes. Have you had your papers remarked yet? :*
Hey, yeah I have applied for a re-mark but I have no idea when i'll get it. It is a shame that I missed by a few marks but that's life I guess, sometimes things don't go as planned and you have to follow a different route to get to your destination. Anyway, don't be dis-heartened about not getting LSE, your grades are really good and you can reapply next year to other unis in the UK that are considered to be just as good as LSE...just think of this rejection as a minor setback. I hope everything works out for you
0
quote
reply
always + forever
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#56
Report 12 years ago
#56
this isn't really related, but I know LSE can be absolute *******s - my mum got diagnosed with cancer in January of A2 year, and my school and my dad wrote to my univeristies, and my insurance (Exeter) was really understanding, and said they'd accept me if I missed my grades by a bit, but LSE were like 'oh, that's a shame, but she still needs to make our original offer ! ! ' :eek:
0
quote
reply
hannah_111
Badges: 0
#57
Report 12 years ago
#57
(Original post by Mylla)
this isn't really related, but I know LSE can be absolute *******s - my mum got diagnosed with cancer in January of A2 year, and my school and my dad wrote to my univeristies, and my insurance (Exeter) was really understanding, and said they'd accept me if I missed my grades by a bit, but LSE were like 'oh, that's a shame, but she still needs to make our original offer ! ! ' :eek:

Really sorry to hear that, hope everything is okay!
0
quote
reply
always + forever
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#58
Report 12 years ago
#58
oh, thank you! it's all okay now, my mum is better, and I managed to scrape my offer - this was a while ago now. I hope you have a good time at your insurance, or the remark works out - LSE really isn't the be-all and end-all. It might feel like it now, bu trust me... work hard and you'll do well where ever you go
0
quote
reply
jakatak
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#59
Report 12 years ago
#59
i kno of a guy that missed his grades.. claimed he was ill and then lse looked at his AS grades and accepted that he might've had an off-day.. he wasnt ill and didnt have an off-day in reality... he now holds an unconditional offer for 2007 entry..
0
quote
reply
shady lane
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#60
Report 12 years ago
#60
That's the problem with the British system--all based on exam performance over a few days. In the US we have GPAs, can't just claim to a university that we had a bad day as we are continually assessed!
0
quote
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Did you get less than your required grades and still get into university?

Yes (4)
44.44%
No - I got the required grades (4)
44.44%
No - I missed the required grades and didn't get in (1)
11.11%

Watched Threads

View All