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The Somali Society Mk III Watch

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    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    I shan't subject myself to taking that chance.

    "Friends exist only to serve as a distraction from your life objectives." - Anonymous_Trader
    Each to their own
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    (Original post by That_Hijabi)
    Each to their own
    Why would you like to have friends, might I ask?
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    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    Why would you like to have friends, might I ask?
    I want to make as many connections as possible because you never know when you might need a friend to help you out with a job once you're finished with unj. You'll be surrounded by future employers and colleagues so its good to meet as many people as possible

    Plus, i love making new friends. C'mon who wants to be a complete loner throughout the 3 years. I'd go crazy!
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    (Original post by That_Hijabi)
    Haha thanks for reassuring me

    I'll be going queen mary's inshaAllah. Know of anyone who goes there?

    btw whats induction?
    Nice! Yes plenty of friends went there from school, you'd definitely make friends then! I would say the friendliest students are at Queen Marys, Kings & City.

    Induction happens usually during Freshers Week and you go to your class and the lecturer will talk about what you'll expect from the course etc and everyone will be there. You'd also be shown in groups how to use the library and navigate it submit work etc
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    For much of the past half century, Kenya has cultivated an image as a peaceful oasis in a region dogged by violence and unrest. “Kenya, hakuna matata” (“No worries in Kenya”) is the unofficial motto on T-shirts peddled to the thousands of tourists who flock the East African country’s sandy beaches and safari parks every year.

    But the image has frayed. The frightening brutality of the Shabab terrorists who killed 67 shoppers during the four-day siege of the Westgate Mall in Nairobi last September shocked the nation. Then, in another brutal rampage, on the night of June 15, dozens of attackers swept into Mpeketoni, a town near the tourist resort of Lamu Island, and mowed down 48 people, many of them dragged from a hotel where they had been watching a World Cup soccer match. A second attack on the nearby town of Majembeni on the following night left nine people dead.

    It did not help matters when President Uhuru Kenyatta went on national television the morning after the second attack and speculated that leaders of the opposition may have been involved. His ill-considered words threaten to turn a security crisis into a political one which could very well boil over into communal fighting between opposition and government supporters — exactly the kind of scenario the Islamic extremists of Al Shabab appear to be aiming for.

    Many observers warn that allowing terrorist to sow internal discord in Kenya would be handing Al Shabab a long-sought victory. By fomenting discontent between two of the country’s major ethnic groups, the Kikuyu and the Luo — both predominantly Christian — the terrorists hope to stoke communal violence and prevent Kenyans from uniting to fight back.

    While it is true that Al Shabab has almost certainly drawn on the support of some Kenyans, the suggestion that national opposition leaders are to blame for the latest killings is widely viewed as unfounded, if not downright bizarre. Mr. Kenyatta’s declaration that the killings were the product of “reckless leaders and hate mongers” — an implicit suggestion that the political opposition planned the attacks — was widely seen as a dubious effort to avoid criticism for the government’s failure to deal with the unrest spilling over from Somalia, our deeply dysfunctional neighbor.

    During the 1990s, as Somalia descended into chaos, Kenya opened its doors to many thousands of refugees, but managed to avoid getting involved in heavy fighting. Then, in 2011, following a spate of abductions of tourists, aid workers and the kidnapping of two Kenyan soldiers, Nairobi ordered troops into Somalia to establish a buffer zone between Shabab strongholds and the Kenyan border. The objective was accomplished but it has come at a heavy cost. Since the incursion, Al Shabab is widely suspected of having launched numerous attacks in Kenya, including bombings that killed at least 10 people in Nairobi in May.

    While those attacks have rattled the nation, the truth is that the terrorists on their own stand little chance of causing serious instability. Kenyans have little appetite for large-scale conflict, and security officials say that the terrorist group’s sympathizers’ in Kenya number in the low hundreds.

    Nevertheless, Al Shabab has been busily trying to feed on Kenya’s internal divisions. In a move that echoes Al Qaeda’s efforts to stoke sectarian fighting in Iraq, the Somalia-based insurgents have been targeting churches in Kenya. There have been several attacks on Sunday worshippers, including a shooting spree at a church in Garissa near the Somali border in 2012 that left at least 15 dead, and another attack at a church in the coastal city of Mombasa on March 23 in which hooded gunmen killed three people and wounded many others.

    Although these incidents sparked wide outrage, they have not provoked retaliatory violence against Muslims. Yet there are persistent fears that the terrorists are trying to exploit the most potent cleavage in Kenyan society — divisions between ethnic groups.

    Ethnicity is a vital and highly volatile component of politics in Kenya, where most voters back political alliances crafted along unambiguously ethnic lines. Accusations of vote-rigging in the 2007 presidential race ignited ethnic violence in which over 1,000 people died. A power-sharing agreement under the auspices of the African Union led to a new Constitution that realigned the executive branch and strengthened local power. In the presidential election last year, Mr. Kenyatta, a member of the largest ethnic community, the Kikuyu, edged out his bitter rival Raila Odinga, an ethnic Luo. There has been no violence since then, but uneasy relations persist. The rivalry reflects the fact the government is the country’s biggest spender. Access to power opens a patronage pipeline in which highly placed officials favor their own people or allied groups in awarding contracts and making appointments to key government jobs.

    Al Shabab has intruded into this delicate situation by consistently targeting members of the president’s community, the Kikuyu, in hopes of creating the impression that the violence is politically motivated, thereby igniting Kikuyu retaliation against the Luo.

    Mr. Kenyatta’s own political standing is tenuous because he is facing trial for crimes against humanity at the International Criminal Court over his alleged role in the violence which followed the disputed 2007 presidential election. His reaction to the challenge posed by Al Shabab has been erratic at best.

    It would be folly for Kenyans to rise to the terrorists’ bait and allow the country to tumble into the abyss of communal violence. Far from squabbling among themselves, Kenya’s leaders would do better to call for unity, and bolster and reform the country’s police force while improving coordination and intelligence-sharing with our Western allies.

    Kenyan’s leaders, particularly President Kenyatta, must grasp the scale of the challenge they face and not jeopardize our country’s position as East Africa’s bastion of stability and progress. Al Shabab’s effort to have Kenyans make scapegoats of one another is an obvious trap, one we must be careful to avoid.
    http://www.hiiraan.com/news4/2014/Ju....3vIRTCLS.dpbs

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    (Original post by That_Hijabi)
    I want to make as many connections as possible because you never know when you might need a friend to help you out with a job once you're finished with unj. You'll be surrounded by future employers and colleagues so its good to meet as many people as possible

    Plus, i love making new friends. C'mon who wants to be a complete loner throughout the 3 years. I'd go crazy!
    I have many of those I've met during my time at various institutions. Although, I'd call them acquaintances (people of beneficial use). I wouldn't warrant them as friends, however. You only get in touch with them to either maintain contact or ask for a favour.

    However, as you said... each to their own. Sometimes being a loner is a good thing. This year I'd consider myself to have been pretty anti-social and believe I've done pretty well for myself. Given the results, I think I might maintain this social status for another year and see how things go.
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    (Original post by SophiaLDN)
    Nice! Yes plenty of friends went there from school, you'd definitely make friends then! I would say the friendliest students are at Queen Marys, Kings & City.

    Induction happens usually during Freshers Week and you go to your class and the lecturer will talk about what you'll expect from the course etc and everyone will be there. You'd also be shown in groups how to use the library and navigate it submit work etc
    Oh yay there are also many muslim girls who wear hijab who will be going to the uni (well i saw many on te psych open day) which is a good thing as hijabis always tend to stick together

    Ahhh right what are the best and worst things about uni? Also are you at a London uni?
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    Another thread?? How many other threads are there?
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    (Original post by missfats)
    All races are equal in Allah's eyes.

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    Well said :-)
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    (Original post by Itachi Uchiha.)
    Another thread?? How many other threads are there?
    After 10,000 posts you're required to start a new thread. This is the third edition of the original Somali Society.
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    salaam
    Did you see the hard talk last night with the former governor of mogadishuo
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    (Original post by Al-farhan)
    salaam
    Did you see the hard talk last night with the former governor of mogadishuo
    Salam walaal, how's ramadan?

    Tarzan! No I missed it unfortunately. Insha'allah I will watch it today. I heard he said he's is going to run in the 2016 elections?

    Things have seriously deteriorated in Somalia...

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    (Original post by Umar1)
    Salam walaal, how's ramadan?

    Tarzan! No I missed it unfortunately. Insha'allah I will watch it today. I heard he said he's is going to run in the 2016 elections?

    Things have seriously deteriorated in Somalia...

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    Guy was trying to be all political and sophisticated and hold himself but you can see he had a few words about the current administration and he didn't want to say it all.
    And it seems likely that he wants to run for 2016.

    Ramadan is good alhamdulilah may Allah help us reap its rewards.

    I have heard that the alshabab have shot dead an MP today.
    Do these people have no off button even just for ramadan.
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    (Original post by Al-farhan)
    Guy was trying to be all political and sophisticated and hold himself but you can see he had a few words about the current administration and he didn't want to say it all.
    He did improve Mogadishu, but didn't really focus on security.
    (Original post by Al-farhan)
    And it seems likely that he wants to run for 2016.
    I doubt the government will be able to hold a democratic election. He will be one of those guys that get a few votes and then tells his voters to vote for person x in the second round.
    (Original post by Al-farhan)
    Ramadan is good alhamdulilah may Allah help us reap its rewards.
    Ameen.
    (Original post by Al-farhan)
    I have heard that the alshabab have shot dead an MP today.
    Do these people have no off button even just for ramadan.
    Right now, Al shabaab is the least of Somalias problems. I think that will give you an idea of how bad the situation is.



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    (Original post by Umar1)
    He did improve Mogadishu, but didn't really focus on security.

    I doubt the government will be able to hold a democratic election. He will be one of those guys that get a few votes and then tells his voters to vote for person x in the second round.

    Ameen.


    Right now, Al shabaab is the least of Somalias problems. I think that will give you an idea of how bad the situation is.



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    Wow, what other calamity has befallen the country?!
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    (Original post by Al-farhan)
    Wow, what other calamity has befallen the country?!
    Clan fighting in Galgaduud, Kismaayo, Lower Shabelle.

    Lower Shabelle is the most serious. Five women, one of them pregnant were recently murdered.

    Fighting between Ahlul sunnah and IJA in Gedo, Somaliland and Khatuumo in Sool. The crazy and ongoing SW3/SW6 dispute and a new Shabelle state.

    The Puntland SFG dispute, SFG recently signed a deal with Shell to come back and explore in Puntland but Puntland refused the deal.

    Somaliland said the SFG has broken the aviation agreement signed in Istanbul..

    And then there's the military renting technicals from clans, wearing five different uniforms etc..


    I could go on all day. There is no hope for the place bro.



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    (Original post by Umar1)
    Clan fighting in Galgaduud, Kismaayo, Lower Shabelle.

    Lower Shabelle is the most serious. Five women, one of them pregnant were recently murdered.

    Fighting between Ahlul sunnah and IJA in Gedo, Somaliland and Khatuumo in Sool. The crazy and ongoing SW3/SW6 dispute and a new Shabelle state.

    The Puntland SFG dispute, SFG recently signed a deal with Shell to come back and explore in Puntland but Puntland refused the deal.

    Somaliland said the SFG has broken the aviation agreement signed in Istanbul..

    And then there's the military renting technicals from clans, wearing five different uniforms etc..


    I could go on all day. There is no hope for the place bro.



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    Subhanallah, things are just not going right everybody is in the throat of everyone else
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    (Original post by Al-farhan)
    Subhanallah, things are just not going right everybody is in the throat of everyone else
    While this is happening Ethiopia, Djibouti and Kenya are building new railways, ports, airports and highways etc..

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    (Original post by Al-farhan)
    Subhanallah, things are just not going right everybody is in the throat of everyone else
    Saxiib I just watched Tarzan on hardtalk... This guy was the mayor of our capital city..



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