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Whose to blame for British obesity? Watch

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    (Original post by hullabaloo123)
    People started getting fat around the 80s and 90s, increased portion sizes and reliance on fast food, snacking etc. British culture doesn't really place much emphasis on the importance of food so we were probably worse affected than most places.

    How are we affected more? Please explain.
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    The Indians lol
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    People just lack self-control; it's understandable with all of the deliciously artificial flavouring that pollutes our tastebuds and makes real food taste bland. It doesn't help that there's a significant difference in price between processed junk and good food. Before I started weightlifting, it was possible to live on around £15 a week by stocking up on frozen chips and searching for special offers on other cheap junk like pizza. Now that I'm on a strict diet, a single pack of chicken breasts (enough for 1.5 days) can easily cost more than £4, so I somewhat agree with a previous poster blaming capitalism for the obesity epidemic.
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    Blame Rooney...

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    I just found this gem from Daily Mail of all places.
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/ar...prisoners.html
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    (Original post by Gherk)
    I just found this gem from Daily Mail of all places.
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/ar...prisoners.html
    this picture says it all




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    The British public, no one else to blame. If they had some sort of self restrain then we wouldn't have this problem. Today's society is becoming more and more about satisfying ones own desires immediately, it's just one part of a bigger problem.
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    Food is tasty and enjoyable, exercise feels boring and tedious. Simples.
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    Smallish punnet of raspberries- £2

    Big bar of chocolate- £1

    That's one of the problems.
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    I agree that the responsibility lies with the overweight person themselves, unless of course they are a child. I am
    Currently overweight and I have no one to blame for it other than myself. However, I see that as a a positive thing because it mean that I can change it myself.

    Having mental health problems made it difficult for me to see this for a while, but now that I am taking responsibility I am losing weight at a good rate and I am feeling happy and healthy.


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    Jaffacakes.
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    (Original post by noobynoo)
    Let's face it we're (the British) one of the most unhealthy countries on Earth.:cheers:

    We eat processed cereals for breakfast like coco pops or corn flakes which have to have added vitamins because they lack any nutritional content.

    For lunch we sit at our desks eating sandwiches and pasties from Gregs. Or drink starbucks coffees. Or have a McDonalds BigMac with a super size Coca Cola - which is basically just damp sugar.

    Then for supper we might eat a microwaved meal or a take-away curry.

    In between eating biscuits and cakes from the supermarket - not freshly made.

    All our supermarket bread is highly processed with bleached white flour, soya(!!) flour and all sorts of additives.

    So firstly whose to blaim that we're so unhealthy? McDonalds? Coca Cola? Capitalism? America? TV? Supermarkets?

    And secondly what can we do about it? Should we just ban processed sugar for our own good? (At least then we wouldn't have the worst teeth too!)

    Or should we just be proud of being a country of over-sized people?

    (And if you don't think we've changed have a look at the Top of the Pops repeats from the seventies where everyone was about half the size!)
    Studies suggest that we actually don't, on average, eat many more calories than we did 50 years ago. A 5% increase at most.

    What we do do is exercise far, far less. In particular, the number of women doing regular organised exercise has dropped from 60% to less than 20% in that time period.
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    (Original post by noobynoo)
    You can blame your parents a bit but just try and find healthy food in a supermarket. It's quite hard.

    In a 4 isle supermarket usually one isle will be alcohol. Another isle crisps and snacks. Another isle frozen ready meals. So pretty much 80% of the food in there is unhealthy.

    And you can't really shop in a butcher or greengrocers as most have shut down from competition from supermarkets. We don't even get milk delivered to our doors any more.

    And our parents saw all these adverts on TV for Kellogs Special K and Diet Pepsi and Low Fat Yogurt (fat is good for you it turns out!) and Margarine and thought they were health foods. So it's not really their fault. They were brainwashed like everyone else.


    A country that thinks Marmite is a delicacy is not making good food choices!

    I don't go up those aisles. I buy fresh veg, fresh dairy, fresh bread, fresh meat and beer. I don't think I've ever walked up the crisp aisle in my local supermarket, I don't even know where it is.

    and what's wrong with marmite exactly?
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    Erm... I don't eat that way. I exercised for 1 hour a day yesterday

    My breakfast= smoothie (bananas etc)
    Snack= Raisins
    Lunch= Wholewheat noodles, mushrooms, soy sauce and vegetables.

    Its not hard to eat healthy
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    My opinion is that the media hold a huge portion of the pie. They tell us silly stories about fat free cereal, I mean come on, cereal doesn't have any fat anyway! I think education needs to be on nutrition, not calories. What is actually good for the body.
    Plus I vouch for the argument that bad food is cheaper. I don't see how Mc Donalds chips being £1 is aiding anyone but Mr McDonald who's raking in the pennies
    • Community Assistant
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    (Original post by noobynoo)
    Let's face it we're (the British) one of the most unhealthy countries on Earth.:cheers:

    We eat processed cereals for breakfast like coco pops or corn flakes which have to have added vitamins because they lack any nutritional content.

    For lunch we sit at our desks eating sandwiches and pasties from Gregs. Or drink starbucks coffees. Or have a McDonalds BigMac with a super size Coca Cola - which is basically just damp sugar.

    Then for supper we might eat a microwaved meal or a take-away curry.

    In between eating biscuits and cakes from the supermarket - not freshly made.

    All our supermarket bread is highly processed with bleached white flour, soya(!!) flour and all sorts of additives.

    So firstly whose to blaim that we're so unhealthy? McDonalds? Coca Cola? Capitalism? America? TV? Supermarkets?

    And secondly what can we do about it? Should we just ban processed sugar for our own good? (At least then we wouldn't have the worst teeth too!)

    Or should we just be proud of being a country of over-sized people?

    (And if you don't think we've changed have a look at the Top of the Pops repeats from the seventies where everyone was about half the size!)
    Simply put it's a combination of effective marketing and individual responsibility.
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    (Original post by xoflower)
    Erm... I don't eat that way. I exercised for 1 hour a day yesterday In the 1950's women used to get up at dawn do 10 hours of housework, scrub the patio, do the shopping, ironing, cleaning, scrub the clothes by hand. That's a work out.

    My breakfast= smoothie (bananas etc) Fruit is full of sugar and is acidic. Hence unhealthy and bad for teeth. Try a broccoli smoothie instead.
    Snack= Raisins Fruit full of sugar. Also can contain preservatives.
    Lunch= Wholewheat noodles, mushrooms, soy sauce and vegetables. Wheat contains gluten - hard for some people to digest. Likewise soya. Try rice instead. No meat means low source of proteins and essential vitamins and fats. Try add some fish or chicken. Also you should eat more vibrant coloured foods for essentials vitamins like red tomatoes and green peppers.

    Its not hard to eat healthy (harder than it looks!)
    See comments above in bold.
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    Jamie Oliver and America
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    (Original post by Teucer)
    The British public, no one else to blame. If they had some sort of self restrain then we wouldn't have this problem. Today's society is becoming more and more about satisfying ones own desires immediately, it's just one part of a bigger problem.
    I see what you did there
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    The cause of rising obesity is due to humans living a more sedentary life style. The often quoted mantra "calories in = calories out" is mathematically correct, however the "calories out" part of the equation, which is in a large part composed of basal metabolism, is tightly regulated by homeostatic mechanisms to ensure the body's weight is maintained at what the hypothalamus considers to be an ideal weight.

    In the event of decreasing intake of calories, the body responds by (1) increasing appetite, and (2) decreasing basal metabolic rate, to ensure body weight remains stable. It has been shown that people who lose weight through dieting will have a lower than predicted metabolism for their new body mass and composition than predicted, which remains low for at least 10 years at possibly indefinitely until weight is regained. This means that people who lose weight due to dieting will have to continue fighting food cravings and lethargy due to decreased metabolism for at least 10 years and possibly for life. Similarly however, if you eat too much calories, the body responds by (1) decreasing appetite, and (2) increasing basal metabolic rate.

    As we can see, while you can prevent obesity by not eating, if your body thinks your ideal weight is more than it currently is, you will constantly be battling the bulge, fighting your own body for life. Therefore the underlying cause of obesity is a malfunction in the hypothalamus' determination of ideal body weight, which manifests itself as in increased appetite and decreased energy expenditure.

    But what has caused this malfunction? Lack of exercise. Long term regular exercise signals to the body to lower the set point body weight, and in turn (1) reduce appetite and (2) increase basal metabolic rate, until the new ideal set point has been achieved.
 
 
 
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