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    (Original post by Petulia)
    I looked into this but then there's the issue of not many unis in London offering Pharmacology degrees. I really don't want to have to relocate do you have or are you considering a similar degree?
    I considered it but I ended up opting to apply for engineering. My college tutor had a pharmacology degree and had a long career working in research labs and told me about his experiences.

    If you're dead serious about having a career in research doing lab work a pharmacology/chemistry/biochemistry degree is one of the better degrees as it sets you up to do further post graduate study so you can progress in the research field. However, salaries and job prospects in the research industry are pretty horrific, and if you want to climb the laboratory ladder you will need to to further study as there's a lot of competition.

    It sounds pretty grim, hence why I didn't want to go down that route
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    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    I hope you're not referring to me
    I wasn't actually, haha. More the people saying they want to do some kind of legal job, using the wrong term for it, and clearly just not having a clue. If you have a genuine interest in the field and money comes along with it I don't see anything wrong with that, but having been through it all myself - the aiming for a top job simply for the prestige and money, realising on the degree you don't want to do it and having a bit of a reality check - I would be interested to see how many people maintain this career choice in a couple of years


    (Original post by samba)
    Hah, it is cynical in a way. Daring to dream is important, and I'm sure many of these people can attain what they want if they have the willpower. Hard to know whether you'll like a job until you're settled in it/specialised anyway, and people are gonna have to get used to being bored. Hell, there's the LPC for anybody wanting to do law! Nobody 'likes' that. Don't see how saying 'lol you're dreaming' is anything BUT cynical! It's also not THAT hard to get into IB/City firms if you work hard. No harm aiming high.

    Me, I'm just stumbling through life not being quite sure. I'll carry on volunteering for CAB/Helping law firms screw the government, and probably take up a judiciary post when I have enough experience. Not ruling out maritime stuff at this point either, but I seem to get most satisfaction from fighting for the little guy.
    It's not cynical, it's not the having a dream part I am criticising, more the reasons for having that 'dream'. And if you think it's not hard to get into City firms then you are extremely naive and a great example of the idealistic teenager I was referring to, I'm afraid...and what do you even mean by 'a judiciary post'? You realise working in a law firm (aka being a solicitor) and working as a barrister/judge in court are two separate professions no? Many of the people on my law degree who dropped out or failed first year were the people spouting all this 'oh I'm going to change the world with legal aid work' (no money in it, FYI) or 'I'm going to work for a top city firm and be like the guys in Suits'. They'd done no work experience, had no idea how the professions worked or how you qualify into them, saw the reality of it and either failed or dropped out. There is absolutely nothing wrong with having a dream, I'm not denying you that. But your dreams should at least on some level be realistic and informed. You might think I'm being an 'old lady', at the ripe 'old' age of 21, but having been in your position and changed my mind, you might realise that a life of working round the clock and doing smelly tube journeys every day isn't actually what you want in life...
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    Wanted to become an Astronomer, well too late for that now. Will probably go into some finance job.
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    (Original post by ChickenMadness)
    25k to 200k depending on lots of stuff.
    im in year 12 and theres this guy in my class earning 50,000 a year already making tf2 stuff
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    (Original post by ChickenMadness)
    25k to 200k depending on lots of stuff.
    :eek: My word. If only I had art skills. Is what you're intending to pursue similar/related to graphic design?
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    App developer/software engineering/games developer, mainly for the money and because I love computers like crazy.

    I find coding/programming fun and enjoyable. Hate the maths involved but I'll eventually get used to it. Need to do a BSc in Computer Science to get into the field.

    If not that, something related to English like journalism or working at a magazine which I think would be fun.
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    (Original post by infairverona)
    I wasn't actually, haha. More the people saying they want to do some kind of legal job, using the wrong term for it, and clearly just not having a clue. If you have a genuine interest in the field and money comes along with it I don't see anything wrong with that, but having been through it all myself - the aiming for a top job simply for the prestige and money, realising on the degree you don't want to do it and having a bit of a reality check - I would be interested to see how many people maintain this career choice in a couple of years
    I've had several experiences with BBs in relation to IB so I genuinely believe this is something I would want to pursue as a career. In fact I'm currently an intern in said industry. May I ask what your experiences were, as it might be of some use?
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    (Original post by infairverona)
    It's not cynical, it's not the having a dream part I am criticising, more the reasons for having that 'dream'. And if you think it's not hard to get into City firms then you are extremely naive and a great example of the idealistic teenager I was referring to, I'm afraid...and what do you even mean by 'a judiciary post'? You realise working in a law firm (aka being a solicitor) and working as a barrister/judge in court are two separate professions no? Many of the people on my law degree who dropped out or failed first year were the people spouting all this 'oh I'm going to change the world with legal aid work' (no money in it, FYI) or 'I'm going to work for a top city firm and be like the guys in Suits'. They'd done no work experience, had no idea how the professions worked or how you qualify into them, saw the reality of it and either failed or dropped out. There is absolutely nothing wrong with having a dream, I'm not denying you that. But your dreams should at least on some level be realistic and informed. You might think I'm being an 'old lady', at the ripe 'old' age of 21, but having been in your position and changed my mind, you might realise that a life of working round the clock and doing smelly tube journeys every day isn't actually what you want in life...
    I edited my post. My sister walked into one last year with a history degree. As I said, 3/4 in my family got it right. I'm the only one that ****ed up. If you have the desire, there's nothing to stop you achieving your goals. A judicial post generally refers to a post in the judiciary :confused: You know, those people appointed by JAC, aptly named the 'judicial appointment commission' In my care probably a tribunal judge in the first instance, unless I diverge to maritime. I volunteer, and have done for a while. I'm well aware there's no money in it (well, you get expenses). The majority of judicial appointments have no money in them either as I'm sure you well know.

    I'm not sure you have any idea what 'my position' is? I'm a disabled mature student and veritable failure at life This thread isn't about my life though, so I'll spare you the details. I failed, maybe you failed too in your initial dreams, but that doesn't mean you should inhibit those of others. Some of the young ones in this thread DO have experience, practice, all those those things, and they likely can make it. Sure, they might realise it's not for them. But that's a journey for them to take.

    The initial post was obviously tongue in cheek. I'm older than you. (I assumed you'd remember my work situation, as we spoke less than 2 years ago. Perhaps you are old and senile )
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    (Original post by Fastlove)
    im in year 12 and theres this guy in my class earning 50,000 a year already making tf2 stuff
    ye you don't even have to be good since theres so many new indie game developers coming out all the time with projects. And 3D artists at all levels are in high demand tbh.

    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    :eek: My word. If only I had art skills. Is what you're intending to pursue similar/related to graphic design?
    Not really. Heres some examples of stuff they do on the uni course. Just keep scrolling theres examples on every page.

    http://www.polycount.com/forum/showthread.php?t=68766
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    (Original post by infairverona)
    I wasn't actually, haha. More the people saying they want to do some kind of legal job, using the wrong term for it, and clearly just not having a clue. If you have a genuine interest in the field and money comes along with it I don't see anything wrong with that, but having been through it all myself - the aiming for a top job simply for the prestige and money, realising on the degree you don't want to do it and having a bit of a reality check - I would be interested to see how many people maintain this career choice in a couple of years




    It's not cynical, it's not the having a dream part I am criticising, more the reasons for having that 'dream'. And if you think it's not hard to get into City firms then you are extremely naive and a great example of the idealistic teenager I was referring to, I'm afraid...and what do you even mean by 'a judiciary post'? You realise working in a law firm (aka being a solicitor) and working as a barrister/judge in court are two separate professions no? Many of the people on my law degree who dropped out or failed first year were the people spouting all this 'oh I'm going to change the world with legal aid work' (no money in it, FYI) or 'I'm going to work for a top city firm and be like the guys in Suits'. They'd done no work experience, had no idea how the professions worked or how you qualify into them, saw the reality of it and either failed or dropped out. There is absolutely nothing wrong with having a dream, I'm not denying you that. But your dreams should at least on some level be realistic and informed. You might think I'm being an 'old lady', at the ripe 'old' age of 21, but having been in your position and changed my mind, you might realise that a life of working round the clock and doing smelly tube journeys every day isn't actually what you want in life...
    My sister didn't have any work experience when she started. She's worked in loads of different multinational law firms now Just takes time. You're only 21 so you don't really have that much experience on this subject to be spouting such negativity tbh lol.
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    (Original post by infairverona)
    I wasn't actually, haha. More the people saying they want to do some kind of legal job, using the wrong term for it, and clearly just not having a clue. If you have a genuine interest in the field and money comes along with it I don't see anything wrong with that, but having been through it all myself - the aiming for a top job simply for the prestige and money, realising on the degree you don't want to do it and having a bit of a reality check - I would be interested to see how many people maintain this career choice in a couple of years




    It's not cynical, it's not the having a dream part I am criticising, more the reasons for having that 'dream'. And if you think it's not hard to get into City firms then you are extremely naive and a great example of the idealistic teenager I was referring to, I'm afraid...and what do you even mean by 'a judiciary post'? You realise working in a law firm (aka being a solicitor) and working as a barrister/judge in court are two separate professions no? Many of the people on my law degree who dropped out or failed first year were the people spouting all this 'oh I'm going to change the world with legal aid work' (no money in it, FYI) or 'I'm going to work for a top city firm and be like the guys in Suits'. They'd done no work experience, had no idea how the professions worked or how you qualify into them, saw the reality of it and either failed or dropped out. There is absolutely nothing wrong with having a dream, I'm not denying you that. But your dreams should at least on some level be realistic and informed. You might think I'm being an 'old lady', at the ripe 'old' age of 21, but having been in your position and changed my mind, you might realise that a life of working round the clock and doing smelly tube journeys every day isn't actually what you want in life...
    You can become a judge as a sol, just more uncommon as a) bazzas are the professional court room guys, b) Sols already have a pension so there's little to lure you away from continuing up the partnership lockstep and c) they know they can work a wig.

    JAC are trying to increase solicitor appointments, which is meeting with some success in tribunals but not so much in the court system. Personally I quite fancy it, I've always loved a bit of fancy dress
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    (Original post by ChickenMadness)
    My sister didn't have any work experience when she started. She's worked in loads of different multinational law firms now Just takes time. You're only 21 so you don't really have that much experience on this subject to be spouting such negativity tbh lol.
    lol, nor mine. The closest she had was a history degree and working part time at an accountants.
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    I'm considering a number of jobs post-Uni, most of them are all related to business in some way:
    The ultimate end goal for me is to become a CEO of a large tech company (either my own or someone else's) then a Partner at a VC firm.

    This is really long because I'm very career focused - I even have a life plan for when I start working!

    Career

    - Strategy Consulting at MBB
    - Investment Banking in a TMT(Tech, Media and Telecoms) coverage group within IBD
    - Product Management at a large tech firm (I.e. Google, Facebook, Microsoft)

    Reasoning
    - Consulting: Love the travelling aspect; it's possible to get a reimbursed ticket to a destination of your choice on weekends. The exposure to C-level management, the variety of projects, and the salary's not half bad! Amazing exit opportunities!

    - Banking: Learning the fundamentals of business, client exposure, working on really high-level deals, opportunity to move into Private Equity and of course the fantastic pay.

    - Product Management: You are effectively the CEO of a specific product, you oversee everything from sales to the development of the product. Getting to liasewith all members of the product team and you have clout with senior level executives.

    Plan
    I'm currently running my own web development studio, getting in contact with people who work in the above careers, planning to do an internship within a startup and/or a bank in the next year, investing my own cash (making some decent returns as well!)

    I'll be applying for Uni courses in Computer Science and Electronics this autumn, gap year schemes and hopefully starting a second company.

    At Uni, I'm hoping to do some spring weeks in IB, try to get an internship at either an IB or a consultancy and finally decide which of the three to pursue for graduate roles.
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    (Original post by ChickenMadness)
    ye you don't even have to be good since theres so many new indie game developers coming out all the time with projects. And 3D artists at all levels are in high demand tbh.



    Not really. Heres some examples of stuff they do on the uni course. Just keep scrolling theres examples on every page.

    http://www.polycount.com/forum/showthread.php?t=68766
    You can make things like animated movies with that sort of stuff?

    I looked at one students work :eek:, incredibly impressive. If you get to learn to model stuff like that... #Strong
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    (Original post by Le Nombre)
    You can become a judge as a sol, just more uncommon as a) bazzas are the professional court room guys, b) Sols already have a pension so there's little to lure you away from continuing up the partnership lockstep and c) they know they can work a wig.

    JAC are trying to increase solicitor appointments, which is meeting with some success in tribunals but not so much in the court system. Personally I quite fancy it, I've always loved a bit of fancy dress
    Pretty sure she didn't have a clue what she meant lol. Probably thought I meant I wanted to be a solicitor/barrister and just termed it wrong and decided to go on offence. You don't even need to be a sol to become a tribunal judge.
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    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    Intended Career: I intend to work as a pharmacist, preferably in a clinical (hospital) setting with a split contract as a teacher practitioner / visiting lecturer in academia. Quite a few of my lecturers have this sort of a contract and they really enjoy retaining the clinical skills that they learnt at university, whilst passing their up-to-date clinical knowledge to students.

    Reasoning: I quite like pharmacology, but would also like a lot more patient contact than pharmacologists would usually get. I believe working as a pharmacist combines these two aspects. Additionally, I believe that clinical pharmacy involves a lot more clinical knowledge than community (retail) pharmacy, which I would love to retain. Teaching is also something that I'm interested in - had some experience at sixth form level tutoring GCSE German during lunch time breaks, and I quite fancied it!

    Steps: I've achieved a first class honours for this year (first class honours in each of the four modules this year). I have 2 weeks of unpaid community pharmacy experience that I gained last summer. This summer I'm working full-time at the same pharmacy (paid), so should have 3 months' experience at the end of the summer holidays. I'm currently looking out for hospital summer placements, but they're few and far between, and competition is tough - applicant : place ratios of around 25 : 1 on the whole. At university I've applied to tutor (facilitate group discussions based on the week's lab/workshop and lecture content) groups of 15 first year students from September.
    Sorry for the essay above, I kind of got a bit carried away haha!
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    (Original post by samba)
    lol, nor mine. The closest she had was a history degree and working part time at an accountants.
    Mine literally had nothing. No contacts or anything, even after she finished her degree. She admitted afterwards she was really naive as well haha. But it's only a matter of time before you get a job and after your first job it's plain sailing since you have the work experience on your CV. Now she can pretty much work where ever she wants since she's already worked at a bunch of prestigious law firms, she actually worked on this big company take over recently that was on the news recently (can't remember which). She's only 25 as well. Still young lol.
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    (Original post by Le Nombre)
    You can become a judge as a sol, just more uncommon as a) bazzas are the professional court room guys, b) Sols already have a pension so there's little to lure you away from continuing up the partnership lockstep and c) they know they can work a wig.

    JAC are trying to increase solicitor appointments, which is meeting with some success in tribunals but not so much in the court system. Personally I quite fancy it, I've always loved a bit of fancy dress
    Pretty sure she didn't have a clue what she meant lol. Probably thought I meant I wanted to be a solicitor/barrister and just termed it wrong. You don't even need to be a sol to become a tribunal judge.

    edit: might have an amusing PM for you next week. Think the DWP have managed to push themselves into a COA corner, but we'll see!
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    x
    Both incredibly detailed and impressive plan. Inspiring, to say the least.
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    (Original post by samba)
    Pretty sure she didn't have a clue what she meant lol. Probably thought I meant I wanted to be a solicitor/barrister and just termed it wrong. You don't even need to be a sol to become a tribunal judge.

    edit: might have an amusing PM for you next week. Think the DWP have managed to push themselves into a COA corner, but we'll see!
    What's the case? Will have a look on BAILII, have basically ignored any actual legal developments since exams started and just general law since they finished!
 
 
 
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