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    (Original post by Zahid~)
    1. This is pretty much the As chem bible http://chemrevise.org/revision-guides/ (if youre doing aqa)
    2. I found the Chemistry student book from nelson thornes extremely helpful (if youre doing aqa ofc) but some people didnt like it
    3. Do all the past papers within a month of your exam (not too late, not too early, atleast thats what i did) if youre lucky a similar question might pop up
    4. pay attention to markschemes to know how examiners expect you to answer, and what they dont accept.
    5. I wrote a page full of mechanisms, diagrams, names of reactions, the name of their mechanisms and their conditions, which i also found very helpful
    6. make your own set of notes to revise from, the writing kinda helps you soak more of it in than just plain reading other peoples notes.
    7. Try to stay ontop of work generally, i remember doing a 'chapter' a day during christmas (where i attempted to finish unit 1 completely) . Unit 2 was alittle more difficult since i had tons of exams and had to refresh unit one too, so yeah try get revision of your unit 1s done during December/January
    8. There is a specification pdf on your exam boards website (pretty sure all specs have it) look at it a bit while writing notes so you know exactly what you need to know (and what you dont need to know, since books exclusively endorsed from specifications often waffle abit)
    9. Youtube is your friend in understanding concepts
    10. Address anything you find difficult immediately, dont delay it.
    I really cant think of anymore :x

    Omg u're so enthusiastic ^^ thks a lotttt
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    (Original post by Scarlett2111)
    Aqa. Is it better?

    I'd advise you to just look through the OCR and AQA specs online
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    (Original post by propagation)
    That took me 1 hour to learn with a white board and learning one lane at a time.
    cool story
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    To OP, www.chemguide.co.uk. is the best for explanations in Chemistry. I love that site.

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    Just literally bang out your chemistry textbook to the point where could turn a page and know everything that's gonna be on that page. Also get more than one textbook because some textbooks do not have all the required content in them.

    Read in further on topics you may not understand on the Internet because it will help you master the area and improve your application skills in the exam.

    Finally do every single past paper on the specification and when you're done with that try legacy past papers or even papers from other exam boards (there may be some questions that you can't Answer but its good practice).
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    The first unit is normally the easiest because it starts of at the equivalent level of GCSE chemistry but then it becomes harder as the units go on. I would recommend learning the periodic table back to front as you need to use it for a lot of the calculations including Molar Mass.


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    (Original post by cathyhelen)
    The first unit is normally the easiest because it starts of at the equivalent level of GCSE chemistry but then it becomes harder as the units go on. I would recommend learning the periodic table back to front as you need to use it for a lot of calculations including Molar Mass.

    why do you think so?

    You get given the periodic table in the exam.

    It's something that might help but sure as hell it's not a necessity.

    The OP needs to focus on the necessary stuff like going over past papers and just general exam technique
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    Hello!
    I think it is important that as soon as you learn something in class to go home and revise. Teachers never go over all that you need to know for obvious time limitations. Read over the textbook before class so you know what the teacher's talking about and can ask questions. Most important is to study the subject for the love of it!!! ANd make your own notes ! don't rely on teachers or other people's notes. Good luck
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    (Original post by James A)
    why do you think so?

    You get given the periodic table in the exam.

    It's something that might help but sure as hell it's not a necessity.

    The OP needs to focus on the necessary stuff like going over past papers and just general exam technique
    Going over Molar mass is an exam technique.:facepalm:

    Some people find it very easy but a lot of people in my class could not do it and they lost points by not being able to do it. I was just giving one example. I did not say to only look at the periodic table. Other people on here have just given one example.
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    (Original post by cathyhelen)
    Going over Molar mass is an exam technique.:facepalm:

    Some people find it very easy but a lot of people in my class could not do it and they lost points by not being able to do it. I was just giving one example. I did not say to only look at the periodic table. Other people on here have just given one example.
    Don't think so.

    Funnily enough I knew the first 20 elements of the periodic table, was comfortable as I learnt it from GCSE. Did it help me?..., well not so much as I could have easily looked taken a sneak at the periodic table in the exam if I was on a molar mass question.

    HENCE why I wouldn't class it as an exam technique.


    Exam technique refers to things such as learning how to answer questions in the correct format, e.g. for a four mark question, you need to be specific about what to include, you can't just give four related points to the question.
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    (Original post by mandyyy6)
    cool story
    :? .
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    (Original post by Scarlett2111)
    Advices on A-level chemistry plssss
    Well it's hard.ive done AQA,
    The amount of revision to get an A* at gcse chemistry will get you an E (minimum) at Alevel chemistry. That's coming from my teacher with a Phd in chemistry.
    So many people underestimate how hard alevel chemistry is ,I've witnessed this with myself and few friends.
    Unit 1 is not too bad ,it looks easy but it's not.it's probably the most underestimated chemistry unit.
    You'll be surprised how many Us you will get before it starts to 'click' and make sense. Everyone goes through that stage believe me.
    Unit 2 is a jump from unit 1 .You suddenly go from 5/6 topics to about 11/12 topics .And the overall mark is now 100.
    It's not like gcse where you can get away with general knowledge .Alevel mark schemes are PICKY and SPECIFIC ,I can't stress that enough.You have to know your stuff in detail.
    Unit4 &5 are another massive step up from AS .I actually found the jump from AS to A2 greater than the jump from Gcse to AS ,chemistry wise anyway.but I was more prepared for it ,I had realised chemistry alevel required a different revision technique from my other alevel subjects (& of course gcse chemistry) and had better teachers.
    A2 is synoptic.To understand A2 you must have a solid understanding of AS.

    Overall ,You have to give it your all .
    Spend hours outside of class because the 4/5/6 hours you receive in class is Not enough .Believe me.You only learn that when you get to A2.
    For now I'd say rest while you have the time.

    That is what I've learnt from 2years of studying chemistry and I wish I say this to all students starting As chemistry this September.


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    Chemistry is a very challenging topic, you should have a good level of mathematical ability because a lot of the chemistry that you come across at A level isn't merely theory; it's problem solving using equations. Revise early! Teachers tell us to do this every year and it's a bit unrealistic, but instead spend maybe an hour every week summarising the work you've done in class and highlighting any key issues or areas which you've found particularly tough and practise them or go ask your teachers for my help. I got a chemistry tutor who I saw twice a week for a few hours which really helped, so if this option is ever available to you take it! Good luck!
 
 
 
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