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    I had the same problem, mainly because I found trying to get the works experience than a physio course requires was ridiculously difficult and I can;t get any so I have no chance of getting on. So now I'm going to do my Bsc in Sport and Exercise Science and do a pre-registration Msc in Physio which will a) mean that after my 3 year bsc and 2 year msc I can go straight into sports physio rather than being a physio and waiting and b) mean that I'll know that sport physio is where I wanna end up, plus give me all of the background knowledge about it.
    Yes it means it isn't funded by the NHS but I'll end up with more support by not being an NHS student and will be able to support myself better financially
    (I've also just finished my AS year)
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    (Original post by emilyjaaayne)
    I had the same problem, mainly because I found trying to get the works experience than a physio course requires was ridiculously difficult and I can;t get any so I have no chance of getting on. So now I'm going to do my Bsc in Sport and Exercise Science and do a pre-registration Msc in Physio which will a) mean that after my 3 year bsc and 2 year msc I can go straight into sports physio rather than being a physio and waiting and b) mean that I'll know that sport physio is where I wanna end up, plus give me all of the background knowledge about it.
    Yes it means it isn't funded by the NHS but I'll end up with more support by not being an NHS student and will be able to support myself better financially
    (I've also just finished my AS year)
    This has made me think. So you can do sports physio after Bsc sport science? Are you 100% sure?


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    (Original post by LewisC)
    This has made me think. So you can do sports physio after Bsc sport science? Are you 100% sure?


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    You do not want to take out 5 years of student finance. You don't even know if you'll be accepted into a masters for physio. The sports science degree will still be a waste of time, as it will be a waste of money and you'll be a couple of years behind in your career as a physio. It's not worth it.
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    (Original post by emilyjaaayne)
    I had the same problem, mainly because I found trying to get the works experience than a physio course requires was ridiculously difficult and I can;t get any so I have no chance of getting on. So now I'm going to do my Bsc in Sport and Exercise Science and do a pre-registration Msc in Physio which will a) mean that after my 3 year bsc and 2 year msc I can go straight into sports physio rather than being a physio and waiting and b) mean that I'll know that sport physio is where I wanna end up, plus give me all of the background knowledge about it.
    Yes it means it isn't funded by the NHS but I'll end up with more support by not being an NHS student and will be able to support myself better financially
    (I've also just finished my AS year)
    You don't actually need direct work experience. Your work experience can be shadowing physiotherapists, working in a shop, volunteering, anything that shows teamwork, etc. You'll be paying for 5 years of finance, and physiotherapists with a couple of years' experience are probably going to have a better chance of getting into sports physiotherapy (which is very competitive), than a newly-qualified with no experience. How will you end up with better support? It will cost more, you'll be wasting time on a degree you don't need, etc.
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    (Original post by Pectorac)
    You don't actually need direct work experience. Your work experience can be shadowing physiotherapists, working in a shop, volunteering, anything that shows teamwork, etc. You'll be paying for 5 years of finance, and physiotherapists with a couple of years' experience are probably going to have a better chance of getting into sports physiotherapy (which is very competitive), than a newly-qualified with no experience. How will you end up with better support? It will cost more, you'll be wasting time on a degree you don't need, etc.
    As far as I'm aware, as physio is NHS funded and super competitive (about 2000:40), ever uni I've been to/want to apply to want direct experience as you need to prove that you're sure that physio is what you want to do.
    I'm well aware of the competitiveness of the profession and "degree I don't need" is completely your own opinion.
    I'm going on what I've been advised by careers advice at my own college and a few uni's (which is what I'd suggest you do ultimately Lewis)
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    (Original post by LewisC)
    This has made me think. So you can do sports physio after Bsc sport science? Are you 100% sure?


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    and then after and msc in pre-registration Physio, it's just a longer route but the first degree gives you the sport background, a degree like sports rehab would be better but rehab/therapy and sport science degrees will all do (go and talk to careers advice etc, thats what I did)
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    (Original post by emilyjaaayne)
    As far as I'm aware, as physio is NHS funded and super competitive (about 2000:40), ever uni I've been to/want to apply to want direct experience as you need to prove that you're sure that physio is what you want to do.
    I'm well aware of the competitiveness of the profession and "degree I don't need" is completely your own opinion.
    I'm going on what I've been advised by careers advice at my own college and a few uni's (which is what I'd suggest you do ultimately Lewis)
    'We would normally expect applicants to have undertaken some work shadowing or observation with a Physiotherapist. We hope to attract applicants who have varied extra-curricular interests and enjoy active participation in areas such as sport, music and the arts in general. Any participation is valued and any achievement in extra-curricula activities will be particularly recognised. '

    http://www.kcl.ac.uk/prospectus/undergraduate/physiotherapy/entryrequirements

    'an observational clinical experience is advised.'

    http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/undergraduate/physiotherapy-bsc

    'Where it is not possible to gain directly relevant experience, gain whatever is most appropriate. For physiotherapy it is helpful to gain experience in at least two different areas in which physiotherapists work so that you can gain an understanding of the scope of the role.'

    http://www.southampton.ac.uk/healthsciences/undergraduate/courses/bsc_physiotherapy.page#entry

    You do not need direct work experience at all. It is pointless to waste £27,000 on tuition fees for a degree you do not need, as well as thousands more for living costs. As long as you have done some shadowing and have had a voluntary or paid job working with the public in any setting, it's fine. If you have the grades, a good personal statement and can show commitment in your interview, actual work experience is not needed and you do not need to waste thousands of pounds as a way to get it.

    Careers advisers at sixth forms and colleges are generally crap and do not know what they are talking about, and it will only be a marginal amount of universities who want direct work experience, like St George's.
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    (Original post by Pectorac)
    'We would normally expect applicants to have undertaken some work shadowing or observation with a Physiotherapist. We hope to attract applicants who have varied extra-curricular interests and enjoy active participation in areas such as sport, music and the arts in general. Any participation is valued and any achievement in extra-curricula activities will be particularly recognised. '

    http://www.kcl.ac.uk/prospectus/undergraduate/physiotherapy/entryrequirements

    'an observational clinical experience is advised.'

    http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/undergraduate/physiotherapy-bsc

    'Where it is not possible to gain directly relevant experience, gain whatever is most appropriate. For physiotherapy it is helpful to gain experience in at least two different areas in which physiotherapists work so that you can gain an understanding of the scope of the role.'

    http://www.southampton.ac.uk/healthsciences/undergraduate/courses/bsc_physiotherapy.page#entry

    You do not need direct work experience at all. It is pointless to waste £27,000 on tuition fees for a degree you do not need, as well as thousands more for living costs. As long as you have done some shadowing and have had a voluntary or paid job working with the public in any setting, it's fine. If you have the grades, a good personal statement and can show commitment in your interview, actual work experience is not needed and you do not need to waste thousands of pounds as a way to get it.

    Careers advisers at sixth forms and colleges are generally crap and do not know what they are talking about, and it will only be a marginal amount of universities who want direct work experience, like St George's.
    Wow. That case you just made was exceptional. You also backed it up with clinical evidence from universities which I admire. I am going to do a physio degree, if I like the sector I'm in after my degree and if I want to look further I will try and do a sport physiotherapy degree, but yes I do think physiotherapy is the sensible option as I won't be in much dept and it's a professional career. Sport science is the type of degree people take if they don't know what to do with their careers and it is competitive. Thank you


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    (Original post by emilyjaaayne)
    and then after and msc in pre-registration Physio, it's just a longer route but the first degree gives you the sport background, a degree like sports rehab would be better but rehab/therapy and sport science degrees will all do (go and talk to careers advice etc, thats what I did)
    Thanks for your help and good luck with your career ma'am. I will most probably go ahead with a physiotherapy degree as it is a rewarding career and it will be a good stepping stone.


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    No offence cause I get that you're trying to help but quoting 3 unis that bear no relevance to my decision (they may to Lewis but not mine) is completely pointless?
    Physiotherapy lecturers and admissions at the universities that I wanted to go to have all but major emphasis on direct experience, great that some others haven't (y)
    Ideally I wanted to go straight into physio but with lacking those requirements I was offered an alternative, think I might rethink it all though
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    (Original post by LewisC)
    Thanks for your help and good luck with your career ma'am. I will most probably go ahead with a physiotherapy degree as it is a rewarding career and it will be a good stepping stone.


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    You too! It most definitely will, I'm sure you'll do great
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    (Original post by emilyjaaayne)
    No offence cause I get that you're trying to help but quoting 3 unis that bear no relevance to my decision (they may to Lewis but not mine) is completely pointless?
    Physiotherapy lecturers and admissions at the universities that I wanted to go to have all but major emphasis on direct experience, great that some others haven't (y)
    Ideally I wanted to go straight into physio but with lacking those requirements I was offered an alternative, think I might rethink it all though
    Which universities said this? The vast majority of them say similar on their entry requirements pages. Do you lack the grades, or the experience (that you do not need the majority of the time)? Which university do you want to go to?
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    So cause I have primary school work experience, hospital work experience and reading on physio plus I'm doing my EPQ on sports rehabilitation I should be good?
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    (Original post by Pectorac)
    Which universities said this? The vast majority of them say similar on their entry requirements pages. Do you lack the grades, or the experience (that you do not need the majority of the time)? Which university do you want to go to?
    Experience and Nottingham/Northumbria, they do say very similar on their pages but when I was talking to the lecturers at open days they were saying how other experience is looked at but generally puts student way below those who do so it could be a massive waste of time and try to get as much direct to put you above, just due to the competitiveness of the courses
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    (Original post by LewisC)
    Thank you. Can I ask are you at uni now? If so, what course?


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    Yes you can ask ha. And no but I'm starting Physiotherapy at Teesside in September which I can't wait for .


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    (Original post by Fenzinho)
    Yes you can ask ha. And no but I'm starting Physiotherapy at Teesside in September which I can't wait for .


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    Ah that's brilliant. What were the requirements? And what experience did you get before applying for physiotherapy?


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    (Original post by LewisC)
    Anyone else?


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    With regards to A levels it depends how many you can manage to take, good ones are normally: biology is a must, Physics is good to have as it will help you understand medical physics that comes later (X-rays, CT scans), Chemistry will give you a great understanding for physiological processes at a molecular level, and PE would give you some experience with exercise and applied anatomy & exercise physiology.

    Hope this helps.


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    (Original post by $hadow)
    With regards to A levels it depends how many you can manage to take, good ones are normally: biology is a must, Physics is good to have as it will help you understand medical physics that comes later (X-rays, CT scans), Chemistry will give you a great understanding for physiological processes at a molecular level, and PE would give you some experience with exercise and applied anatomy & exercise physiology.

    Hope this helps.


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    Thanks. I've actually just completed my first year of A levels and I'm going ahead with Biology, PE and psychology in the second year, dropping economics. What are you doing at the moment?


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    (Original post by LewisC)
    Ah that's brilliant. What were the requirements? And what experience did you get before applying for physiotherapy?


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    I had to get 3 distinctions and 3 merits in my access course, 2 of which had to be biology related. I did 1 week shadowing physios in a hospital and a few days shadowing a private physio.


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    (Original post by LewisC)
    Thanks. I've actually just completed my first year of A levels and I'm going ahead with Biology, PE and psychology in the second year, dropping economics. What are you doing at the moment?


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    I doing a physiotherapy degree, going into my second year in September.

    I had to do an access course, I need 30 distinctions with 15 in biology and science.


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