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    (Original post by Protoxylic)
    Candidate 1 A*A*A in Maths, Chemistry and Physics

    Candidate 2 A*A*A*A* in Maths, Further Maths, Chemistry and Physics

    Offer for NatSci at Cambridge A*A*A

    Both candidates met the offer, and hence both candidates (holistically) are strong enough academically to pursue a degree. Granted, the 2nd applicant took FM and got more A*'s, but this does not take away from the other applicant, his or her's ability to get a good degree (upper 2nd or first) from the university. Also, contextual information is taken into account, whether this is rate of entry to higher education in postcode areas, or performance of your secondary school and/or sixth form/college in addition to any illnesses during the exam season.
    Thanks for the information.

    But in your example, if those two candidates had no mitigating circumstances, were on the same level of wealth, i.e. both middle class, and both attended the same type of school - i.e. private/grammar etc.

    Wouldn't you as an admissions officer choose the 2nd candidate?

    The whole admissions process I find for the top universities is largely confusing.

    For last year's entering class at Harvard:
    The average self-reported unweighted GPA on a 4.0 scale was 3.94. Fifty-four percent of students reported a perfect 4.0, and the lowest score reported was a 3.0.

    Freshmen reported an average composite SAT score of 2237. The reported average subject score was consistent across the three sections, with an average of 748 in the math section, 746 on writing, and 744 on critical reading.
    http://features.thecrimson.com/2013/...dmissions.html

    Using this as an example, a student got admitted to Harvard with a GPA of 3.0. IIRC this is equivalent to a mix of A's and B's for GCSE. In effect terrible grades in comparison to the scale of other applicants.

    But are all those factors you mentioned, taken into consideration?
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    (Original post by Damien_Dalgaard)
    Thanks for the information.

    But in your example, if those two candidates had no mitigating circumstances, were on the same level of wealth, i.e. both middle class, and both attended the same type of school - i.e. private/grammar etc.

    Wouldn't you as an admissions officer choose the 2nd candidate?

    The whole admissions process I find for the top universities is largely confusing.

    For last year's entering class at Harvard:The average self-reported unweighted GPA on a 4.0 scale was 3.94. Fifty-four percent of students reported a perfect 4.0, and the lowest score reported was a 3.0.

    Freshmen reported an average composite SAT score of 2237. The reported average subject score was consistent across the three sections, with an average of 748 in the math section, 746 on writing, and 744 on critical reading.


    http://features.thecrimson.com/2013/...dmissions.html

    Using this as an example, a student got admitted to Harvard with a GPA of 3.0. IIRC this is equivalent to a mix of A's and B's for GCSE. In effect terrible grades in comparison to the scale of other applicants.

    But are all those factors you mentioned, taken into consideration?
    Well you apply before your A2 results, hence it would be more based on the number of A's rather than A*'s in that particular case. But an admissions officer has lots more information to consider, it is a holistic approach with respect to AS scores (UMS if submitted/required), GCSEs, interview performance, pre interview exams, personal statement and contextual data. The number of A levels is never a scenario to compare between candidates because some colleges/sixth forms do not even have the facilities to allow for the teaching.
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    they're all massive subjects, especially maths, everyone i know doing maths is constantly spending so much of their time on it! you are obviously very academically-able but avoid unnecessary stress at all costs. I would advise you to do less than seven, as every body hears how difficult A levels are but until you actually do them you don't realise how much work it is. Just be prepared for no sleep and constant 12 hour revision sessions every weekend if you do seven! or see how you go and then drop a couple further down the line, but don't feel dissapointed in yourself if you do because everyone understands how difficult they can be and there is also no point making yourself ill over the amount of work you have hope that helps x
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    (Original post by Protoxylic)
    Well you apply before your A2 results, hence it would be more based on the number of A's rather than A*'s in that particular case. But an admissions officer has lots more information to consider, it is a holistic approach with respect to AS scores (UMS if submitted/required), GCSEs, interview performance, pre interview exams, personal statement and contextual data. The number of A levels is never a scenario to compare between candidates because some colleges/sixth forms do not even have the facilities to allow for the teaching.
    What about those such as myself, who do exams as private candidates and do not attend school?

    And I understand about what you were saying now.
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    (Original post by JAIYEKO)
    Hiya, I went to my Sixth Form open day recently and contemplating on doing the following A-Level subjects, should I have any chance of achieving all A*s at A2.

    Maths
    Further Maths
    Biology
    Chemistry
    Physics
    Geology
    French - possibly


    I'm aware GCSEs is ridiculously easy compared to AS let along A2 and they're almost irreverent to University applications, but I'm determined to get 6A*s at A2 and overall before making my way to Oxbridge to study Medicine or Engineering, or in order words whatever profession can make me the most.

    I'm going to a private SF and so timetable would be personified for me to fit the above subjects.
    Oxbridge really doesn't care how many A levels you have, but they do care about the grades.

    At the end of your AS levels AAAA looks better than AAAAAAB. For Oxbridge doing 4 A levels is the norm, possibly 5. Anything more than that is excessive, even ridiculous.
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    (Original post by JAIYEKO)
    Hiya, I went to my Sixth Form open day recently and contemplating on doing the following A-Level subjects, should I have any chance of achieving all A*s at A2.

    Maths
    Further Maths
    Biology
    Chemistry
    Physics
    Geology
    French - possibly


    I'm aware GCSEs is ridiculously easy compared to AS let along A2 and they're almost irreverent to University applications, but I'm determined to get 6A*s at A2 and overall before making my way to Oxbridge to study Medicine or Engineering, or in order words whatever profession can make me the most.

    I'm going to a private SF and so timetable would be personified for me to fit the above subjects.
    My maths teacher advised me not to carry on with 4 A levels next year, and though I may still take 4 I think his advice was sound: it's better to do fewer subjects and really develop your interest in them than do <arbitrary number> and not have the time.
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    (Original post by Damien_Dalgaard)
    What about those such as myself, who do exams as private candidates and do not attend school?

    And I understand about what you were saying now.
    There is a ratio of private to state educated offer holders at Cambridge and I believe it is 63:37 with 63% state educated. That isn't a statistic which pertains to the chance of private candidates getting an offer. I don't really know much about private candidates and how that application process goes. However, I would believe that the same rules apply; just because a private candidate took more A-Levels, doesn't necessarily mean one is stronger than the other, since the other candidate could have just equally have chosen them. It all boils down to the 3 A levels that are relevant to your degree.
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    I'm in same boat as you, want to do medicine or engineering whichever gives the most money/easiest employment and i doubt 6 A levels will be manageable as theres a much higher work load and i don't know how many lessons you have in a school day but i doubt they will be able to timetable you for 6 different A levels. Also medicine only counts Maths and Further Maths as one and they only take your best 3 or 4 anyway so it won't really matter.Also, They do take into account now that you are more previliged than others to be able to do 6 A levels and go to a private sixth form and so overall it probably won't make much difference
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    (Original post by Protoxylic)
    There is a ratio of private to state educated offer holders at Cambridge and I believe it is 63:37 with 63% state educated. That isn't a statistic which pertains to the chance of private candidates getting an offer. I don't really know much about private candidates and how that application process goes. However, I would believe that the same rules apply; just because a private candidate took more A-Levels, doesn't necessarily mean one is stronger than the other, since the other candidate could have just equally have chosen them. It all boils down to the 3 A levels that are relevant to your degree.
    Okay thanks sir.

    Just a final question, do you not think that a student(disregarding poverty or extremely lower class in terms of wealth)
    who has better grades than another student is smarter than the other student.
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    (Original post by JAIYEKO)
    French or a MFL is extremely well looked up by top top Universities even when you achieve an A* in it, so your first point is invalid.

    Geology is advisable for (Petroleum) Engineering and so your second point is also invalid.

    If you don't know me, you'll know that I capable of achieving 99% at all 7 A-Levels.

    Au revoir
    I just saw this and have to conclude you are a troll.

    What is the point in starting a thread, if you already know the answer. If you are just out of GCSE then how the hell can you possibly know you will get 99% at A level? Such delusion and arrogance is only befitting of a troll or a victim of the dunning Kruger effect.

    Oxford and Cambridge don't care at all about how many A levels you take. You apply in the AS year anyway so the offer is going to be conditional on your AS level results not your A level results. Even if you get an offer, itl only probably be on 4 A levels like everybody else, but why take the risk - they might just decide to make it conditional on all 7.

    And this is assuming you will get an offer in the first place, you will have to do admissions tests for medicine, and interviews for pretty much everything else. If you want to apply for mathematics you will have to do a maths admission test.

    No one cares about A levels other than a stepping stone to get to university. Trying to get 7A* just to impress everybody is simply not worth the risk.
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    (Original post by Damien_Dalgaard)
    Okay thanks sir.

    Just a final question, do you not think that a student(disregarding poverty or extremely lower class in terms of wealth)
    who has better grades than another student is smarter than the other student.
    Not at all, exams are just 1 measure of intellect. Although it is criticized to be a measure of memory, there are some questions that require thought rather than regurgitation of knowledge. Also ones perception of smartness varies from person to person, for example one person may believe a student who can do their 13 times tables is smart, whereas another may believe solving differential equations may be their benchmark. It's all relative.
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    (Original post by JM97)
    I'm in same boat as you, want to do medicine or engineering whichever gives the most money/easiest employment and i doubt 6 A levels will be manageable as theres a much higher work load and i don't know how many lessons you have in a school day but i doubt they will be able to timetable you for 6 different A levels. Also medicine only counts Maths and Further Maths as one and they only take your best 3 or 4 anyway so it won't really matter.Also, They do take into account now that you are more previliged than others to be able to do 6 A levels and go to a private sixth form and so overall it probably won't make much difference
    Medicine does not pay well - junior doctors start off at around £23000pa. And jobs are not easy to come by. Engineering is a better bet.

    But if I wanted to make some real money I would go into accountancy or fund management.

    As for the OP what an arrogant twerp he is. With his attitude he certainly won't get into medicine - you need to have people skills and be capable of dealing with us plankton
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    (Original post by Protoxylic)
    Not at all, exams are just 1 measure of intellect. Although it is criticized to be a measure of memory, there are some questions that require thought rather than regurgitation of knowledge. Also ones perception of smartness varies from person to person, for example one person may believe a student who can do their 13 times tables is smart, whereas another may believe solving differential equations may be their benchmark. It's all relative.
    You talk so intelligently...

    Thanks for your help
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    (Original post by JAIYEKO)
    Hiya, I went to my Sixth Form open day recently and contemplating on doing the following A-Level subjects, should I have any chance of achieving all A*s at A2.

    Maths
    Further Maths
    Biology
    Chemistry
    Physics
    Geology
    French - possibly


    I'm aware GCSEs is ridiculously easy compared to AS let along A2 and they're almost irreverent to University applications, but I'm determined to get 6A*s at A2 and overall before making my way to Oxbridge to study Medicine or Engineering, or in order words whatever profession can make me the most.

    I'm going to a private SF and so timetable would be personified for me to fit the above subjects.
    How many GCSEs did you take?

    It being manageable depends on you.
    If you did 7 or 8 GCSEs only, then 7 A2s maybe be a big jump.
    If you did more than 15 GCSEs, you probably could handle 7 A2s.

    Anyway, Oxbridge also focuses on interviews and 'passion' for the subject. So be prepared for those as well.
    You can still be rejected despite having 7A*s, so just remember to make other parts of your application strong as well.

    For your information, the professionals that make the most money are probably investment bankers.
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    (Original post by Damien_Dalgaard)
    Thanks for the information.

    But in your example, if those two candidates had no mitigating circumstances, were on the same level of wealth, i.e. both middle class, and both attended the same type of school - i.e. private/grammar etc.

    Wouldn't you as an admissions officer choose the 2nd candidate?

    The whole admissions process I find for the top universities is largely confusing.

    For last year's entering class at Harvard:
    The average self-reported unweighted GPA on a 4.0 scale was 3.94. Fifty-four percent of students reported a perfect 4.0, and the lowest score reported was a 3.0.

    Freshmen reported an average composite SAT score of 2237. The reported average subject score was consistent across the three sections, with an average of 748 in the math section, 746 on writing, and 744 on critical reading.
    http://features.thecrimson.com/2013/...dmissions.html

    Using this as an example, a student got admitted to Harvard with a GPA of 3.0. IIRC this is equivalent to a mix of A's and B's for GCSE. In effect terrible grades in comparison to the scale of other applicants.

    But are all those factors you mentioned, taken into consideration?
    They'd choose who performed better in the interview... Which is likely to be the one who did more wider reading etc... Which is likely to be the one who had more spare time... Which is likely to be the one who... Did less A-levels!


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    Wasn't OP the guy who posted that horrible three simultaneous equations question thread in the Maths section of the forum, saying that if you couldn't solve it, you weren't suitable for Oxford?

    Obvious troll is obvious.
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    (Original post by squeakysquirrel)
    Medicine does not pay well - junior doctors start off at around £23000pa. And jobs are not easy to come by. Engineering is a better bet.

    But if I wanted to make some real money I would go into accountancy or fund management.

    As for the OP what an arrogant twerp he is. With his attitude he certainly won't get into medicine - you need to have people skills and be capable of dealing with us plankton
    Jobs are extremely easy to come by for NQ doctors; they're practically guaranteed a job.


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    Most unis say that having 4 a levels or more won't give you an advantage over the ones with 3
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    (Original post by JAIYEKO)
    French or a MFL is extremely well looked up by top top Universities even when you achieve an A* in it, so your first point is invalid.

    Geology is advisable for (Petroleum) Engineering and so your second point is also invalid.

    If you don't know me, you'll know that I capable of achieving 99% at all 7 A-Levels.

    Au revoir
    Sorry but you're gonna make a **** doctor, and with an attitude with that no one will want to employ you.
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    (Original post by JAIYEKO)
    Ok it's my first time using this website, I'll make my message short and simple

    Maths- A*s
    English Lit&Lang- B, B
    Science Core- B
    Geography- C
    French- A*
    Music- A
    Art- C

    I'm doing Geology, Further Maths, Maths, Physics and French in college, but will drop Physics and French in the 2nd year

    I'm planning on doing Petroleum Engineering (Masters)?, and you?
    can u plz tutor me
 
 
 
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