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Quitting smoking THREAD Watch

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    I quit 6 months ago cold turkey. Not a single drag or cig or spliff. Boom!
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    (Original post by mikeyd85)
    I quit 6 months ago cold turkey. Not a single drag or cig or spliff. Boom!
    Brilliant !!

    And that's with no help whatsoever? Just willpower?
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    (Original post by Michael!)
    You quit smoking 3 days ago. Tell me they worked when you've gone two months without smoking.

    I'm not saying that they won't work because they definitely can. It's just not the best way to quit.
    (Original post by Monsieur Gamma)
    Haven't had one puff of a smoke from the day I posted this thread - still using e lites .... Hmmm, so they do work.
    In what sense do they 'work'? To stop physically smoking cigarettes - fine. They don't work when it comes to tackling the nicotine addiction, they merely prolong it. If you're still addicted to nicotine then there's still the urge to smoke the cigarette.

    As Michael says, they are not the best way to quit. The best way to quit is to deal with the nicotine addiction and that means going cold turkey.
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    (Original post by Monsieur Gamma)
    Brilliant !!

    And that's with no help whatsoever? Just willpower?
    Correct. Just willpower. I kept dreaming of smoking, then I'd feel really guilty in my dreams. That actually really helped!
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    (Original post by Wilfred Little)
    In what sense do they 'work'? To stop physically smoking cigarettes - fine. They don't work when it comes to tackling the nicotine addiction, they merely prolong it. If you're still addicted to nicotine then there's still the urge to smoke the cigarette.

    As Michael says, they are not the best way to quit. The best way to quit is to deal with the nicotine addiction and that means going cold turkey.
    The real reason I quit smoking is because I got scouted to play for Fulham FC, and that my health was becoming an issue. So I binned the rest of my rolling Tobacco and brought an electronic cig - knowing I'd still be "addicted" .... Tbh, I skimmed past what you and that Michael dude told me, because is rather be addicted to nicotine rather than inhaling toxic chemicals like tar and CO :/
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    I've always been a sprinter ... Long distance is a no-go, even when I was a non-smoker
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    I love smokers for all the tax they pay. Are they nett contributors? I would have thought so. I was in a garage the other day and momentarily glanced over the shoulder of the rather pretty female cashier as she expertly manipulated my BP charge card into the swipe machine. Do you know, i didnt realise cigs had become so dear? I saw some at ten pounds, yes £10 per packet !

    Phew.. now all you smokers, if only i could replay to you the sights my eyes have witnessed in the 2 or 3 years before my old Auntie died of lung cancer. She was a good smoker all her life. Her last couple of years were spent in an armchair watching telly and lashed to first an Oxygen generator and then compressed oxygen bottles simply because her lungs were so knackered that she could no longer extract enough O2 from the air around her.

    Something we so take for granted.

    Totally housebound and waiting to die, the only respite was the period trip to hospital to pump her full of diuretics via a drip to force her frail body to offload excess fluid because her bodily tissues were slowly becoming saturated..essentially drowning from within to to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Of course its always someone else isnt it..?
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    (Original post by Monsieur Gamma)
    Haven't had one puff of a smoke from the day I posted this thread - still using e lites .... Hmmm, so they do work.
    Can you read? I said two months...
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    (Original post by Limpopo)
    I love smokers for all the tax they pay. Are they nett contributors? I would have thought so. I was in a garage the other day and momentarily glanced over the shoulder of the rather pretty female cashier as she expertly manipulated my BP charge card into the swipe machine. Do you know, i didnt realise cigs had become so dear? I saw some at ten pounds, yes £10 per packet !

    Phew.. now all you smokers, if only i could replay to you the sights my eyes have witnessed in the 2 or 3 years before my old Auntie died of lung cancer. She was a good smoker all her life. Her last couple of years were spent in an armchair watching telly and lashed to first an Oxygen generator and then compressed oxygen bottles simply because her lungs were so knackered that she could no longer extract enough O2 from the air around her.

    Something we so take for granted.

    Totally housebound and waiting to die, the only respite was the period trip to hospital to pump her full of diuretics via a drip to force her frail body to offload excess fluid because her bodily tissues were slowly becoming saturated..essentially drowning from within to to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Of course its always someone else isnt it..?
    Cool story bro.

    This is an ex smoker thread, not a "smoking is so bad for you lalala" rant thread
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    (Original post by Monsieur Gamma)
    Cool story bro.

    This is an ex smoker thread, not a "smoking is so bad for you lalala" rant thread
    Indeed,i was just putting a world in for my old Auntie as she is now an ex smoker.
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    (Original post by Wilfred Little)
    In what sense do they 'work'? To stop physically smoking cigarettes - fine. They don't work when it comes to tackling the nicotine addiction, they merely prolong it. If you're still addicted to nicotine then there's still the urge to smoke the cigarette.

    As Michael says, they are not the best way to quit. The best way to quit is to deal with the nicotine addiction and that means going cold turkey.
    They work for all aspects ... You have different intensities, just like for chewable nicotine gym.

    I used to smoke, on average, 5 cigs a day, so of course my blood pressure would be high, but the nicotine levels wouldn't be as high as someone who smoked 30 a day (like my aunt, who has lung cancer now).

    So for me, the cravings, were still there but quite minimal. I could go through a day without smoking one. This is another reason I've chosen to quit, because it really, really isn't worth it.

    Anyway, my point is, you can decrease the nicotine level until you reach a point where you really don't need one. And that, I'm happy to say is where I am now.

    I carry my e lite wherever I go ... Some times I won't have it on me because it needs charging. Whenever my cravings get too high, I'll take a couple of puffs and get on with my day.

    Maybe they didn't work good for you, or the donkey, but they're working wonders on me. It all depends on how much you smoked before.
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    (Original post by Limpopo)
    Indeed,i was just putting a world in for my old Auntie as she is now an ex smoker.
    Coolios I'm really glad for your auntie indeed, mine has done the same but alas all too late
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    Wonderful idea for a thread!

    Just a bit of encouragement for those in the process of quitting or thinking about quitting - what happens when you stop smoking....

    1) Within 20 minutes, your blood pressure and heart rate return to normal
    2) After 8 hours, oxygen levels return to normal and nicotine/carbon monoxide levels drop by half
    3) 24 hours - carbon monoxide and nicotine are GONE from your body!
    4) 48 hours - your taste and smell improves
    5) 1 month - your appearance starts to improve, less wrinkles and the colour of your skin returns to it's normal complexion
    6) 3-9 months - coughing and wheezing declines
    7) 1 year - Your risk of heart attack HALVES when compared to other smokers
    8) 10 years - Your risk of lung cancer HALVES when compared to other smokers
    9) 15 years - Your risk of heart attack FALLS to the same level as a non-smoker!

    Best of luck guys!
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    (Original post by Anonymοοse)
    Wonderful idea for a thread!

    Just a bit of encouragement for those in the process of quitting or thinking about quitting - what happens when you stop smoking....

    1) Within 20 minutes, your blood pressure and heart rate return to normal
    2) After 8 hours, oxygen levels return to normal and nicotine/carbon monoxide levels drop by half
    3) 24 hours - carbon monoxide and nicotine are GONE from your body!
    4) 48 hours - your taste and smell improves
    5) 1 month - your appearance starts to improve, less wrinkles and the colour of your skin returns to it's normal complexion
    6) 3-9 months - coughing and wheezing declines
    7) 1 year - Your risk of heart attack HALVES when compared to other smokers
    8) 10 years - Your risk of lung cancer HALVES when compared to other smokers
    9) 15 years - Your risk of heart attack FALLS to the same level as a non-smoker!

    Best of luck guys!
    Thanks lad.

    But I think these all depend on how much you smoked, no?
 
 
 
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